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Matt Hancock says that attacks on NHS employees are not tolerated, as data show that 28% have been abused

Health Secretary Matt Hancock says ministers will not tolerate physical or verbal attacks on NHS personnel, as data show that 28% have been abused

  • A survey of 569,000 employees revealed that many abuse the public
  • 15% have experienced physical violence, rising to 34% among ambulance personnel
  • Black and ethnic minority workers are 14% more likely to experience violence
  • A new agreement has been approved that will punish those who abuse staff

Health Secretary Matt Hancock says that physical or verbal attacks on NHS employees are not tolerated, as data show that 28 percent have been abused.

Mr. Hancock addressed the staff and said to the staff “it is not part of your job” to endure abuse in any form.

A survey of 569,000 employees in 2019 showed that more than one in four had experienced harassment, bullying or abuse in the past year.

Another 15 percent experienced physical violence, which amounts to 34 percent among ambulance personnel.

Black and ethnic minority workers are 14 percent more likely to experience violence, because figures show that racism is the most common form of discrimination.

A new agreement has been approved that will penalize members of the public for violent action against front-line NHS employees.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock says that physical or verbal attacks on NHS employees are not tolerated, as data show that 28 percent have been abused

Health Secretary Matt Hancock says that physical or verbal attacks on NHS employees are not tolerated, as data show that 28 percent have been abused

A letter from Mr. Hancock that will be shared with all NHS employees says: “There is far too much violence against NHS employees and too much acceptance that it is part of the work.

‘Far too often I hear stories that the people you are trying to help lash out. I saw it myself in A & Es, during night shifts and ambulances.

“I’m shocked that every member of the public would abuse or physically attack a member of our NHS employees, but it happens too often.

‘All colleagues in the NHS deserve to work in a safe, caring and compassionate environment.

ARE NHS STAFF ‘HAPPIER’?

Staff in the NHS Staff Survey in 2019 reported that the quality of care in the NHS has improved in the last year, with more than seven out of ten that they would recommend their organization to their families and friends for treatment, a proportion that every year has increased for the past five years.

More than four-fifths of staff said they were satisfied with the quality of care they give patients, and the proportion of staff who said they were able to provide the care they aspire to was at the highest registered level.

Employees report earlier this year that their manager encourages them at work, tensions in work relationships have decreased and employees are less inclined to leave their organization compared to 2018.

For the fifth consecutive year, the percentage of employees reporting that their managers are positively interested in their health and well-being has risen from 66 percent in 2015 to 70 percent last year.

However, other findings from the 2019 survey showed that 40 percent of staff felt unwell due to work-related stress in the previous 12 months, compared to 39.8 percent the year before and 36.8 percent in 2016.

About 22.9 percent also said they had unrealistic time constraints, compared to 20 percent the year before.

Meanwhile, the number of employees who have worked extra unpaid hours in the last five years has fallen, although 55.9 percent still do so every week.

“You deserve a work environment that supports your physical and mental health and helps you get the best out of yourself.”

His letter emphasized the findings of the most recent NHS Staff Survey, in which 569,000 NHS England employees were interviewed in 300 different organizations.

Employees said they are happier now and recommend their organization as a workplace rather than last year.

But too many still experience abuse of the public, patients or their relatives.

More than one in four (28.5 percent) said they had experienced harassment, harassment or abuse, and nearly one in seven (14.9 percent) had physical violence.

Nearly 40,000 of the respondents (7.2 percent) said they had faced patient discrimination in the past year – compared to 5.8 percent in 2015.

Racism was the most common form of discrimination, but in 2019 there were also the highest levels of reported sexism and religion and sexuality intolerance.

Mr Hancock said: ‘It is terrible that this is happening at all. In fact, it happens disproportionately with black and ethnic minority staff.

‘We do not tolerate attacks – physically or verbally – against NHS colleagues – staff or volunteers. You must also not tolerate violence or abuse. Abused or abused is not part of your job. “

Mr Hancock has urged staff to report any act of abuse or violence, no matter how small, because figures show that half of the staff did not register the last time they were involved in an incident.

In addition, a new agreement between the police, the NHS and the Public Prosecution Service makes it easier to prosecute attacks or hate crimes against personnel.

As a result of the historic legislation introduced in 2018, the prison conditions for these offenses have also been doubled.

The agreement recognizes that staff abuse is sometimes committed by people in crisis or with neurological disorders. These cases will be dealt with appropriately.

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