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Man who shot, killed and dumped his pet saltwater crocs demands compensation 

Twist in the case of a man who shot and dumped his crocodiles, named Big Boy and Little Girl, outside a government office after being forced to give them up for demanding compensation

  • WARNING GRAPHICS CONTENT: Contains images that readers may find disturbing
  • Man who killed his crocodiles seeks government compensation
  • He says the Ministry of Environment and Science should pay him $100,000
  • He wants to cover the costs he has incurred over the years to comply with regulations

A Queensland man who shot his beloved pet crocodiles before throwing their bloodied carcasses on the doorstep of a government building is demanding compensation from the state’s environment ministry.

Innisfail Landcare contractor Adrian Hogg had legally kept his saltwater crocodiles “Big Boy” and “Little Girl” in a enclosure in his backyard for years.

However, the permit reforms in 2020 prevented him from renewing his permit for 2018 when it expired in 2021.

Mr Hogg was given a ‘cruel’ ultimatum by the Ministry of Environment and Science: replace the pretzels or have them put to sleep by a vet.

In response, Mr. Hogg shot both of his pets in the head and drove them to the department door, yelling as he dumped the carcasses that he hoped the department officials were happy with themselves.

He is now demanding $100,000 in damages from the department to recoup the cost of maintaining the crocs under the previous licensing terms.

Adrian Hogg bought his saltwater crocodiles for $700 and watched them grow up before saying he had no choice but to shoot them

Mr. Hogg threw the carcasses of his crocodiles onto the sidewalk of a Department of Environment and Science building

Adrian Hogg bought his saltwater crocodiles for $700 and watched them grow before saying he had no choice but to shoot them

Mr Hogg took the drastic action to shoot his pets after the department told him they needed proof of the crocodiles’ deaths if he wanted to put them to sleep.

Mr Hogg said he was devastated to have to kill his pets and said it was “terrible, absolutely terrible” to shoot them.

Mr Hogg said keeping the crocodile enclosure in compliance with regulations had cost him more than $30,000

Mr Hogg said keeping the crocodile enclosure in compliance with regulations had cost him more than $30,000

The Department of Environment and Science has asked Mr. Hogg to have his crocodiles put to sleep by a vet, but he put them to sleep himself

The Department of Environment and Science has asked Mr. Hogg to have his crocodiles put to sleep by a vet, but he put them to sleep himself

He said he had argued with the department for years and that following the rules combined with keeping his pets over the years had cost him about $50,000.

The enclosure for the animals cost him $30,000.

“They’ve harassed me for the past five years since I legally held them,” said Mr Hogg.

“I followed every law, including building a loft at great expense, with the permit condition that I had to meet those standards.”

He claims that along with the expensive compliance regime, the department is trying to smear his name.

The Queensland Department of Environment and Science say they are investigating the circumstances of the deaths of both of Mr Hogg's crocodiles, whose carcasses he threw on the front door of a government building.

The Queensland Department of Environment and Science say they are investigating the circumstances of the deaths of both of Mr Hogg’s crocodiles, whose carcasses he threw on the front door of a government building.

A spokeswoman for the Department of Environment and Science said Mr Hogg was never asked to shoot the animals herself

A spokeswoman for the Department of Environment and Science said Mr Hogg was never asked to shoot the animals herself

“They’re just trying to change it that I’m the evil one,” he previously told the Daily Mail Australia.

†[They don’t] such as media coverage of their requirements for euthanasia of healthy, captive-protected native animals.

“They are supposed to conserve wild animals, not order their destruction.”

Mr Hogg said he bought the pretzels for $700 in the Northern Territory and invested $30,000 in an “escape-proof” enclosure for them at his home, including a lagoon filled with fish.

He says he wants financial compensation from the department to recoup the thousands of dollars he spent building a fence that met department standards when his permit allowed him to legally own the crocs.

Mr. Hogg is demanding about $100,000 from the Department of the Environment and Science, an amount he said he would do.

“If they can make you spend money and change the rules and leave you dry, how good is that for trust in government?” he told the Cairns Post

A spokeswoman said the department had not told Mr Hogg to shoot the crocodiles, but instead have them killed humanely.

He said the matter is now under investigation.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted the Queensland Department of Environment and Science for comment.

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