Jack Aston, Al Bayati and Yak Dut: the legal system of Australia in the spotlight

Australia's legal system is in the spotlight as the momentum grows to free a father who will spend more time in prison than a child abuser and a criminal who fooled two female police before threatening to kill them.

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Bus driver Jack Aston has been behind bars for five years and three months, with a unconditional release of two and a half years, for hurling his coach in an accident-prone Melbourne bridge, notorious for accidents involving high vehicles.

Six people were injured, but no one was killed in 2016. The driver had a clean record. He was not drunk and had no drugs in his system. Even his wounded did not want him imprisoned.

But while Aston languishes in a maximum security prison in Melbourne, security guard Mohammad Hassan Al Bayati can walk the streets within 30 months after he has kidnapped and abused a three-year-old girl.

Al Bayati, 30, led the girl away from a playground at DFO Homebush in Sydney in December 2016, before she touched her underwear and exposed his penis in a stairwell.

security guard Mohammad Hassan Al Bayati can walk the streets within 30 months after a kidnapping and abuse of a three-year-old girl

security guard Mohammad Hassan Al Bayati can walk the streets within 30 months after a kidnapping and abuse of a three-year-old girl

Mohammad Hassan Al Bayati, 30, touched the young girl's underwear and attacked her indecently at DFO Homebush, in Sydney in December 2016
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Mohammad Hassan Al Bayati, 30, touched the young girl's underwear and attacked her indecently at DFO Homebush, in Sydney in December 2016

Mohammad Hassan Al Bayati, 30, touched the young girl's underwear and attacked her indecently at DFO Homebush, in Sydney in December 2016

Eleven minutes later, after receiving sexual satisfaction, he brought her back to the playground where her seven-year-old sister was crying because she couldn't find her younger brother or sister.

The girls' mother, who had returned from shopping, also waited there and was soon honored by Al Bayati, who had the guts to tell her about the dangers of leaving children behind.

On Tuesday, he was sentenced to four and a half years, but could be released by mid-2021.

Meanwhile, a man who beat two female police officers and boasted that he would not go to jail because he is black & # 39; a slap on the wrist.

Yak Dut was chased by the female police when they saw him driving a missing wheel in Volkswagen last February in Mill Park, near Melbourne.

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The then 21-year-old stopped outside his home in South Morang and attacked the officers so violently that they were taken to the hospital.

Yak Dut (photo) hit two female police officers in the air and boasted that he would not go to jail because he is black & # 39; and received an even lighter blow to the wrist

Yak Dut (photo) hit two female police officers in the air and boasted that he would not go to jail because he is black & # 39; and received an even lighter blow to the wrist

Yak Dut (photo) hit two female police officers in the air and boasted that he would not go to jail because he is black & # 39; and received an even lighter blow to the wrist

He was sentenced to 12 months' imprisonment last week and a two-year community order for corrections, but on Friday he ran free with time already served

He was sentenced to 12 months' imprisonment last week and a two-year community order for corrections, but on Friday he ran free with time already served

He was sentenced to 12 months' imprisonment last week and a two-year community order for corrections, but on Friday he ran free with time already served

The female officers, 36 and 57 years old, claim to have trauma as a result of the attack that left them with injuries in the hospital (photo)
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The female officers, 36 and 57 years old, claim to have trauma as a result of the attack that left them with injuries in the hospital (photo)

The female officers, 36 and 57 years old, claim to have trauma as a result of the attack that left them with injuries in the hospital (photo)

After his arrest, he threatened to chase the women and kill them with their own weapons.

Dut then boasted that no judge would dare put him in jail because of his skin color.

& # 39; I am getting away with everything because I am black. I will play the race card, & he said to the police.

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He was sentenced to a prison sentence of 12 months last week and a community promotion of two years, but on Friday he ran free with time.

The leniency of the sentences of Dut and Al Bayati seems all the more wrong in comparison with those of Aston, whose own victims think he should not have been put behind bars.

The 55-year-old took the 3.8-meter bus into the Montague Street bridge – with a headroom of three meters – in February 2016.

Dieu Atem, 20, was sentenced to five years earlier this month - three months shy of Aston & # 39; s punishment - for drunk partying outside a Melbourne pub

Dieu Atem, 20, was sentenced to five years earlier this month - three months shy of Aston & # 39; s punishment - for drunk partying outside a Melbourne pub

Dieu Atem, 20, was sentenced to five years earlier this month – three months shy of Aston & # 39; s punishment – for drunk partying outside a Melbourne pub

More than 200 teenagers had gathered at the Gasometer Hotel in the Collingwood suburb of Melbourne for a rap music performance when Atem, drunk and concussion, drove his car into the crowd.
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More than 200 teenagers had gathered at the Gasometer Hotel in the Collingwood suburb of Melbourne for a rap music performance when Atem, drunk and concussion, drove his car into the crowd.

More than 200 teenagers had gathered at the Gasometer Hotel in the Collingwood suburb of Melbourne for a rap music performance when Atem, drunk and concussion, drove his car into the crowd.

In October last year, a jury found Aston guilty of six allegations of negligent injury.

& # 39; Jack is grouped with all those kinds of people, like he's in prison with people who killed people, & # 39; his wife Wendy told A Current Affair last week.

Since the father of two was put in jail, his family, friends and the wider community have gathered to form a & # 39; Free Jack & # 39; movement that called for his release.

Aston & # 39; s injured passengers believe his sentence was too heavy and have joined the campaign to free him.

Despite a broken spine, crushed vertebrae and PTSD diagnosis after the crash, Kathy Apostolidis believes that community service would have been a better sentence.

& # 39; I thought (the sentence) was actually harsh. I was surprised, I thought "wow, that's a lot", Mrs. Apostolidis said.

& # 39; We often forget that it was an accident & # 39 ;.

The Ballarat father also has the support of media personalities, including 3AW broadcaster Justin Smith, who has raised awareness of what he regards as an & # 39; unjust & # 39; punishment.

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"We have seen years and years of mild convictions, and all of a sudden they have decided to get tough and have done it to a good guy," said Smith.

& # 39; The Montague Street Bridge has been hit a few hundred times before (by buses and trucks). Jack Aston has only done what people have done before, and he is absolutely buried for it & # 39 ;.

Aston wrote an emotional letter to his former employer, Gold Bus Ballarat, in which he said the prison system tried to destroy his self-esteem, self-esteem, and morality.

The company has supported Aston and his family since the crash, for court fees and a visit to their former prison officer.

& # 39; Jack is grouped with all those kinds of people, like he's in prison with people who killed people, & # 39; his wife Wendy (right) told A Current Affair

& # 39; Jack is grouped with all those kinds of people, like he's in prison with people who killed people, & # 39; his wife Wendy (right) told A Current Affair

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& # 39; Jack is grouped with all those kinds of people, like he's in prison with people who killed people, & # 39; his wife Wendy (right) told A Current Affair

Since the father of two was put in jail, his family, friends and the wider community have gathered to form a & # 39; Free Jack & # 39; movement that called for his release.

Since the father of two was put in jail, his family, friends and the wider community have gathered to form a & # 39; Free Jack & # 39; movement that called for his release.

Since the father of two was put in jail, his family, friends and the wider community have gathered to form a & # 39; Free Jack & # 39; movement that called for his release.

& # 39; In prison, the system tries to take everything away from me: my self-esteem, identity, morality, self-esteem, self-esteem and principles, & # 39; Aston wrote from prison.

& # 39; After nearly six months in Middleton prison, I know they will never take away my belief in people and my hope. The belief that I have in people is now stronger than ever in good people.

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& # 39; The generosity of you and your team at Gold Bus is great. Gold Bus feels like a community to me, you all have the biggest hearts I know. It feels like you remember what used to be good. & # 39;

Although Aston had no drugs or alcohol in his system at the time of the crash, his punishment is more severe than a teenager who said he was & # 39; drunk & # 39; when he walled party people in front of a pub in Melbourne.

Jack Aston drove the 3.8-meter bus into the Montague Street bridge in Melbourne - with a clear height of 3 meters - in February 2016

Jack Aston drove the 3.8-meter bus into the Montague Street bridge in Melbourne - with a clear height of 3 meters - in February 2016

Jack Aston drove the 3.8-meter bus into the Montague Street bridge in Melbourne – with a clear height of 3 meters – in February 2016

Dieu Atem, 20, was sentenced to five years earlier this month – three months shy of Aston's punishment – on the September 2018 incident that ended in amputating the leg of a teenage victim.

More than 200 teenagers had gathered at the Gasometer Hotel in the Collingwood suburb of Melbourne for a rap music performance when Atem, drunk and concussion, drove his car into the crowd.

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The South Sudanese citizen – who is in Australia with a humanitarian visa – pleaded guilty to five allegations, including reckless behavior that endangers life and driving without a driver's license.

The judge said Atem was driving back and forth up and down the street in a way that could kill someone & # 39 ;.

Aston & # 39; s injured passengers believe his punishment was too heavy and have joined the campaign to free him

Aston & # 39; s injured passengers believe his punishment was too heavy and have joined the campaign to free him

Aston & # 39; s injured passengers believe his punishment was too heavy and have joined the campaign to free him

Partygoer David Dada, then 18, was crushed between Atem's car and another vehicle.

Despite multiple surgeries following the horrific incident, doctors had no choice but to amputate the teen's right leg.

Atem and his male passenger left the scene on foot before the police arrested him a few hours later.

Atem drank a great deal of alcohol all night and he had never been at the wheel of a car before.

The South Sudanese citizen could be out of jail in 2021 after having received a non-suspended sentence of just three years.

An appeal to the Aston sentence will be heard in early October.

An appeal to Jack Aston's punishment will be heard in early October. His wife Wendy Aston, daughter Meg Aston and son Ben Aston, are seen resisting his will

An appeal to Jack Aston's punishment will be heard in early October. His wife Wendy Aston, daughter Meg Aston and son Ben Aston, are seen resisting his will

An appeal to Jack Aston's punishment will be heard in early October. His wife Wendy Aston, daughter Meg Aston and son Ben Aston, are seen resisting his will

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