Ida: TV station staff evacuated from control room as hurricane rips off part of office roof

A New Orleans TV station had to evacuate its control room after Hurricane Ida ripped off part of its office roof while they were working on Sunday night.

Journalist Susan Roesgen tweeted around 8:30 p.m. local time that both the producers and directors of ABC-affiliated WGNO-TV fled the control room during live coverage when the roof came off.

“WGNOtv producers and directors have been forced to leave the control room during our live coverage – the ceiling has fallen – we are at the Galleria in Metairie,” she said.

Ida battered Louisiana and plunged New Orleans into darkness on Sunday, leaving at least one dead and about a million people without power in southern Mississippi and Louisiana.

Pictured: A video shot from the WGNO-TV building on Sunday night showing water pouring in through the ceiling as Hurricane Ida wreaked havoc in New Orleans

The WGNO studio is located on Galleria Drive in Metairie, New Orleans, on Lake Pontchartrain. The neighborhood was heavily flooded when Hurricane Katrina hit the city 16 years ago in August 2005.

Video shared by meteorologist Hank Allen showed water pouring in through the ceiling of the WGNO building, while garbage cans were placed under the leaks.

Another reporter, Chris Wetley, tweeted a photo from inside the building that showed a hole in the roof, showing the sky outside.

Meteorologist Brooke Laizer took to the social media platform to report that parts of the ceiling came down at the weather center, along with a photo of what looked like a desk covered in debris.

WGNO meteorologist Scot Pilié said one of the station’s satellites was destroyed in the extreme weather, with Hurricane Ida reported as a Category 4 storm.

There are no reports of injuries from the studio.

Pictured: A tweet from reporter Chris Wetley showing a hole in the television studio roof, showing the sky outside

Pictured: A tweet from reporter Chris Wetley showing a hole in the television studio roof, showing the sky outside

Journalist Susan Roesgen tweeted around 8:30 p.m. local time that both the producers and directors of ABC affiliate WGNO-TV fled the control room during a live coverage when the roof came off

Journalist Susan Roesgen tweeted around 8:30 p.m. local time that both the producers and directors of ABC affiliate WGNO-TV fled the control room during a live coverage when the roof came off

Pictured: The Galleria Building on Galleria Drive in Metairie, New Orleans, on Lake Pontchartrain.  The district was heavily inundated when Hurricane Katrina raged through the city for 16 years a day in August 2005.

Pictured: The Galleria Building on Galleria Drive in Metairie, New Orleans, on Lake Pontchartrain. The district was heavily inundated when Hurricane Katrina raged through the city for 16 years a day in August 2005.

The hurricane swept through the region on Sunday, knocking out electricity to all of New Orleans, creating sustained winds of more than 150 mph and ripping roofs off buildings.

Authorities announced the first death as a Louisiana resident late Sunday, a 60-year-old man who died when a tree fell on his home in Ascension Parish — even as the storm was downgraded to a Category 1 hurricane.

APSO reports first death related to Hurricane Ida. Shortly after 8:30 p.m., officers received reports of a civilian who may have been injured by a fallen tree at a residence off Highway 621 in Prairieville,” the Ascension Parish Sheriff’s Office said.

“The officers arrived on the scene and confirmed that the victim is now deceased.”

The National Weather Service warned of storm surges and flash flooding for several areas, including the town of Jean Lafitte, just south of New Orleans, where Mayor Tim Kerner said the levees had been breached by rapidly rising water.

Part of a building's roof is seen after it was blown off during rain and wind in New Orleans' French Quarter on Sunday

Part of a building’s roof is seen after it was blown off during rain and wind in New Orleans’ French Quarter on Sunday

“Total destruction, catastrophic, our city levees have passed over,” Kerner told ABC affiliate WGNO. ‘We have stranded somewhere between 75 and 200 people in Barataria’, after an inland vessel removed the swing bridge to the island.

“The wind is still too strong, we can’t put boats in the water to reach them,” he told WGNO.

Meanwhile, hundreds of residents of Jefferson and St. John the Baptist Parish are stranded as floods over 10 feet high and violent winds make it impossible for first responders to reach them.

Officials in Lafitte and Jean Lafitte say a failed levee was the cause of the rising water.

“We’ve got some people stuck that we can’t reach, one of them is the wind, we can’t put boats in the water, it’s just too rough, it would be life threatening to the person operating the boat right now.” time,” Mayor Tim Kerner Jr. by Jean Lafitte CNN.

“We’ve tried to make high-water trucks, we can’t go through the water.”

The image above shows security camera footage from the Delacroix Yacht Club from the Delacroix back bank towards Bayou Terre Bouef

The image above shows security camera footage from the Delacroix Yacht Club from the Delacroix back bank towards Bayou Terre Bouef

Jean Lafitte Police Chief in Jefferson Parish said at least 400 people who were physically or financially unable to follow the mandatory evacuation order before the storm due to physical or financial reasons are trapped in the area.

Rescue teams are unable to reach them as flooding between 10 and 12 feet high and sustained winds of 70 mph make the area inaccessible, according to WWNO TV, with no rescue operations expected until the morning because the conditions are too dangerous.

“They’re scared because they’ve never seen this before,” Jean Lafitte police sergeant Jason Leorwald said of the stranded residents.

“They have never experienced such a storm. Our residents have experienced this all their lives and never thought it would happen.’

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards said Ida could be the most powerful storm to hit the state since 1850.

“There is no doubt that the coming days and weeks are going to be extremely difficult,” he said at a briefing Sunday, adding that some people will have to shelter in place for up to 72 hours.

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