How Twitter contributed to keeping the Prime Minister in No10 in a dramatic 24 hours in British politics

Theresa May (photo above) was supported by a margin of 200 to 117 in a non-confidential mood

On the Downing Street sign, the call was registered Tuesday at 10.35 pm. It was Sir Graham Brady for the prime minister. It was bad news.

The chairman of the 1922 committee confirmed what the Westminster rumor mill had proposed hours earlier – that 48 MPs had no confidence in the prime minister and that it would therefore be voted by the parliamentary party. If a majority voted against her, she was out.

Mrs. May told Sir Graham that she & # 39; felt like arranging it and settling the matter.

Theresa May (photo above) was supported by a margin of 200 to 117 in a non-confidential mood

Theresa May (photo above) was supported by a margin of 200 to 117 in a non-confidential mood

It was a relentless end to a grueling day. The Prime Minister had returned to RAF Northolt at 9 p.m. after a visit to The Hague, where she met Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, Berlin, for a meeting with Chancellor Merkel and then Brussels to meet EU President Donald Tusk and Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker. . she was trying to get guarantees about the Northern Ireland backstop that could convince Tory rebels to support the government's withdrawal agreement.

The whistlestop tour came after she had the vote on the Brexit deal on Monday, knowing she had suffered a heavy defeat. Now she fought for her political life.

No 10 stores

Yesterday the first meeting started in number 10 at 7 a.m. – one hour earlier than normal. At 7.40 am Sir Graham issued a press release in which he confirmed that the motion of censure would be held.

An hour later, Ms. May was down in Downing Street and promised them & # 39; with everything I have & # 39; to fight.

She has explained several arguments to convince hesitant members of parliament. Firstly, she warned that no new leader could be available before January 21, the date on which the meaningful vote & # 39; about the Broadcasting Agreement will take place.

This would mean that negotiations on opposition to parliamentarians would be left – which could force an even softer Brexit or a second referendum.

Ms. May also warned that this could lead to the postponement of Great Britain's postponement under Article 50 being postponed or postponed indefinitely.

Interior Minister Sajid Javid (photo above) was expelled from the Houses of Parliament after he had voted for Prime Minister Theresa May without any confidence

Interior Minister Sajid Javid (photo above) was expelled from the Houses of Parliament after he had voted for Prime Minister Theresa May without any confidence

Interior Minister Sajid Javid (photo above) was expelled from the Houses of Parliament after he had voted for Prime Minister Theresa May without any confidence

And she said that a leadership competition would mean that the party spends weeks and tears us apart … just as we should stand together to serve our country & # 39 ;. She added: & # 39; The only people whose interests would be served are Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell. & # 39;

No time to waste

The realization that she would be confronted with a vote of no confidence was a blow, but it was not entirely unexpected. In mid-November, Jacob Rees-Mogg, the chairman of the European Research Group (ERG) of the Brexiteers hardline, publicly called Ms. May.

That coup attempt failed miserably, but by signaling his intention, he gave Downing Street a crucial advantage: time to prepare.

Aides began to plan to arrange a motion of censure.

The rebels, on the other hand, seemed disorganized. At least one member of the ERG was & # 39; furious & # 39; about the speed at which the vote was called – they expected it to be next Monday, leaving more time to prepare.

According to the rules of the 1922 committee, a vote should be held as soon as possible, so Sir Graham had the right to go fast.

The quick vote was also appropriate for No. 10. Senior assistants who discussed the timing on Tuesday concluded that it would have been impossible to go to the EU Council on Thursday to try to provoke concessions from EU leaders with the vote & # 39; hang above our heads & # 39 ;.

Michael Gove (pictured above) leaves the Houses of Parliament in Westminster

Michael Gove (pictured above) leaves the Houses of Parliament in Westminster

Michael Gove (pictured above) leaves the Houses of Parliament in Westminster

Loyalists demonstration

The Downing Street machine went overdrive. Loyalist MPs went to TV and radio stations to convey the message of the Prime Minister, following Justice Minister David Gauke, who appeared on the most important interview with 8.10 am in the program Radio 4 & # 39; s Today. No 10 hammered members of parliament with voting data.

It showed that two-thirds of the Tory council members wanted to keep Mrs. May and three-quarters of Tory's voices wanted her to continue through Brexit.

The public does not believe that rivals would get a better deal, with three to one. Internal election succession also brought to light that three-quarters of Tory's electorate had the wrong moment to change prime minister. and that Ms. May is the most popular leader among the Tory voters of all potential candidates.

British Secretary for International Development Penny Mordaunt (photo above)

British Secretary for International Development Penny Mordaunt (photo above)

British Secretary for International Development Penny Mordaunt (photo above)

Twitter starts

On social media, the cabinet came after Mrs May and other ministers followed. Within minutes of Sir Graham announcing the vote, party chairman Brandon Lewis tweeted his support for Ms. May, and said the party had a duty to deliver for our country, & # 39;

Secretary of State Jeremy Hunt, Interior Minister Sajid Javid and secretary of work and pensions Amber Rudd – all seen as potential candidates for leadership – followed by supporting tweets in the next 20 minutes.

Company secretary Greg Clark tweeted to say that he admired the grit and determination of Mrs. May and Michael Gove said he was 100 percent & # 39; supported.

Jeremy Hunt (photo above) had a somber expression on his face when he left Parliament

Jeremy Hunt (photo above) had a somber expression on his face when he left Parliament

Jeremy Hunt (photo above) had a somber expression on his face when he left Parliament

At 10.00 am Julian Smith, the main whip, also tweeted his support. The only ministers who do not tweet, including Transport Secretary Chris Grayling and Minister of Culture Jeremy Wright, do not have personal Twitter accounts.

One of the last to show his support was Secretary of Defense Gavin Williamson, who was number 10 and did not have his phone.

Meanwhile, the battle was fought in the corridors of the House of Commons.

The whips, accused of maintaining discipline, were armed and catchy potential rebels and also went to work on their herds & # 39; MPs who return the voting numbers to Smith

There was a remarkable absence of new opponents who indicated that they would not vote for May.

Former Environment Minister Owen Paterson announced his intention to do so on Tuesday evening and Sir Bernard Jenkin on Wednesday morning, but neither statement was a big surprise. Even more disturbing for No. 10 were the members of parliament who were said to be & # 39; good thinking & # 39 ;.

State Secretary for Work and Pensions, Amber Rudd (photo above) leaves the parliament on 12 December

State Secretary for Work and Pensions, Amber Rudd (photo above) leaves the parliament on 12 December

State Secretary for Work and Pensions, Amber Rudd (photo above) leaves the parliament on 12 December

Christmas canceled

Some MPs pointed to one factor other than the high principle: Christmas. A loyalist said, voice dripping with sarcasm: "It is clear that in many ways I prefer a very bitter leadership contest during Christmas. But not in many ways. & # 39;

Some interventions by ministers were not useful. Federal Chancellor Philip Hammond said that the mood of the extremists & # 39; would erase an agenda for the Brexit that would harm Great Britain – a remark that Ms. May would later object to.

Plymouth MP Johnny Mercer – a critic of the government but no Brexiteer – called it hopelessly misjudged & # 39 ;.

Sir Graham Brady (middle), chairman of the 1922 Committee and flanked by Geoffrey Clifton-Brown (left), Bob Blackman and Cheryl Gillian (right), announced that Theresa May was an attempt by Tory MPs to twist her as party leader has survived with a vote of no confidence in the Houses of Parliament in London

Sir Graham Brady (middle), chairman of the 1922 Committee and flanked by Geoffrey Clifton-Brown (left), Bob Blackman and Cheryl Gillian (right), announced that Theresa May was an attempt by Tory MPs to twist her as party leader has survived with a vote of no confidence in the Houses of Parliament in London

Sir Graham Brady (middle), chairman of the 1922 Committee and flanked by Geoffrey Clifton-Brown (left), Bob Blackman and Cheryl Gillian (right), announced that Theresa May was an attempt by Tory MPs to twist her as party leader has survived with a vote of no confidence in the Houses of Parliament in London

The same Cabinet ministers, who publicly stripped their colleagues because they did not support the prime minister, simultaneously spoke to parliamentarians to get support for their own leadership bids.

Arch-Remainer Anna Soubry accused Boris Johnson of a "big charlatan". to be and & # 39; cruise around the tea rooms & # 39; to get support. In the meantime, the Labor MPs were barely able to keep the laugh off their faces.

& # 39; We go for lunch and then come back and put our feet on the floor. Merry Christmas, & # 39; said a Labor employee.

& # 39; A victory is a victory & # 39;

The prime minister (left) had a meeting with Mark Rutte (right) on Tuesday to discuss the Brexit deal

The prime minister (left) had a meeting with Mark Rutte (right) on Tuesday to discuss the Brexit deal

The prime minister (left) had a meeting with Mark Rutte (right) on Tuesday to discuss the Brexit deal

Shortly after lunch, the number of MPs who had spoken in favor of Ms. May was a maximum of 172.

This gave the officials hope, although they did not count their chickens. A senior Tory said: "This is a sophisticated voter – some may lie."

There was also an extensive game of 'managing expectations & # 39; A senior Tory critic from Ms. May said she would have to go if 80 MPs revolted because she had lost the majority of backbench MPs.

On the other hand, a cabinet minister said that she could lose 100 and still continue as a leader. Others stressed & # 39; a victory is a victory & # 39; – and she would continue, regardless of whether she won with one voice.

Faced with PMQ & # 39; s

Ms. May arrived at 11.10 am in the Commons in her ministerial car. Her husband, Philip, was there for Prime Minister's questions and told the e-mail that he & # 39; sure & # 39; was of victory. Mrs. May went through PMQ's – Labor leader Jeremy Corbyn sounded angry and failed to give a blow.

When in the post-PMQs briefing of lobby journalists an assistant number 10 dropped a bomb.

He said that Ms. May does not believe that today's vote is about who leads the party to the next election.

The point is whether it is wise to change leader at this point in the negotiations & # 39;

This was an important signal to MPs that the Prime Minister would not try to fight the next elections, which would take place in 2022. Some saw it as a sign that No. 10 had no confidence in the vote.

Rebuff from DUP

Shortly after 13:00, Ms. May met with DUP leader Arlene Foster and deputy leader Nigel Dodds in the office of PM PM in an effort to rebuild relationships.

The Northern Irish party has given up its support to the government over the Northern Irish backstop.

Jacob Rees Mogg (photo above) said he accepted the vote of confidence & # 39 ;, but said that the Prime Minister should resign

Jacob Rees Mogg (photo above) said he accepted the vote of confidence & # 39 ;, but said that the Prime Minister should resign

Jacob Rees Mogg (photo above) said he accepted the vote of confidence & # 39 ;, but said that the Prime Minister should resign

After the meeting, Mrs. Foster & # 39; demanded fundamental changes & # 39; in the legal text of the agreement.

Several Tory MPs who planned to vote against the Prime Minister pointed to the collapse of the DUP deal to support the government – and the loss of its majority in the Commons – that are crucial to their decision.

Shock and tears

Shortly after 17:00, Ms. May made the earlier hint explicit when she entered the crunch meeting of Tory MPs in Commission Chamber 14 – the room where they would shortly thereafter vote to determine her fate.

She said to them: "In my heart I would have liked to have led to the next election, but I realize that we will need a new leader with new goals for the 2022 elections. & # 39; Sources said that the mood in the room is bleak & # 39; was and that there is shock & a few tears in the eyes & # 39; was when she said it.

Minister of the cabinet Chris Grayling (pictured above) immediately insisted that Ms. May now go to Brussels to try to renegotiate the deal

Minister of the cabinet Chris Grayling (pictured above) immediately insisted that Ms. May now go to Brussels to try to renegotiate the deal

Minister of the cabinet Chris Grayling (pictured above) immediately insisted that Ms. May now go to Brussels to try to renegotiate the deal

A Tory MP described it as a powerful and moving moment & # 39; and the Prime Minister had heard, heard, and respected the will of the party & # 39 ;.

When she was pressed, Ms. May refused to set a clear date for her departure, because Tony Blair was forced to use the Curry House plot in 2006. to follow.

She also struck down Mr Hammond for his previous & # 39; extremist & # 39; gijp and said: & # 39; There are no extremists in this party.

The result

Shortly before 9:00 PM Sir Graham entered Commission room 14 – which was packed with MPs, ministers and journalists to announce that Ms. May had won.

The announcement was greeted with the loud banging of desks by loyalists.

Then Sir Graham announced the result – 200 for and 117 against, which means that more than a third of the party voted against the Prime Minister.

Minister of the cabinet Chris Grayling immediately insisted that Ms. May now go to Brussels to try to renegotiate the deal.

Allies also pointed out that the Prime Minister had won more votes than in the first round of the 2016 Leadership Contest. Rees Mogg said he accepted the vote of confidence, but said that the Prime Minister should resign.

Half an hour later, outside No. 10, an enraged Mrs. May agreed that it was a "long and challenging day." Has been.

.