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Face recognition: the US military has built up a biometric database with more than 7.4 million identities and claims that the technology is a & # 39; game changer & # 39; is (file photo)

How the US Army has quietly built a database for face recognition with more than 7.4 million identities, ranging from active soldiers to terrorists

  • The US government claims that biometric technology is a & # 39; game changer & # 39; is
  • In the first half of this year alone, thousands of people were identified in the database
  • An official said: "by denying the anonymity of opponents, we can concentrate on fatality"
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The US Army has built a face recognition database with more than 7.4 million identities and claims that the technology is a & # 39; game changer & # 39; has been found.

The extensive database includes terrorists in war zones and troops from allied countries who train with American troops.

According to a government presentation obtained by A zero, the database had identified thousands of people on a military watch list in the first half of 2019 alone.

Glenn Krizay, director of the Defense Forensics and Biometrics Agency, told a defense conference in June that & # 39; denying the anonymity of our opponents allows us to focus on our deadly & # 39 ;.

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Face recognition: the US military has built up a biometric database with more than 7.4 million identities and claims that the technology is a & # 39; game changer & # 39; is (file photo)

Face recognition: the US military has built up a biometric database with more than 7.4 million identities and claims that the technology is a & # 39; game changer & # 39; is (file photo)

Promotion: a presentation (above) given by the director of the Defense Forensics and Biometrics Agency boasted that the system denies & # 39; anonymity & # 39;

Promotion: a presentation (above) given by the director of the Defense Forensics and Biometrics Agency boasted that the system denies & # 39; anonymity & # 39;

Promotion: a presentation (above) given by the director of the Defense Forensics and Biometrics Agency boasted that the system denies & # 39; anonymity & # 39;

In notes for his presentation, Krizay said that face recognition & # 39; resembled tearing the camouflage mesh from the landfill of enemy ammunition & # 39 ;.

The database, officially the automated biometric information system, is also linked to the FBI's own face recognition database, he explains.

This could enable the US military to search face recognition data from US civilians and enemy combatants.

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Authorities say the majority of submissions were collected by the US and allied forces during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Soldiers used the technology to determine if prisoners had a criminal history in the United States.

Secret North Korean agents, ISIS terrorists and Chinese spies could also be identified using biometrics, Krizay suggested.

Krizay cited Russia's alleged poison plan against a former spy in Britain as an example of where face recognition was used to identify suspects.

Two Russians were accused by the British authorities of the assassination of Sergei Skripal in March 2018, although there is no prospect of their rendition.

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The database also contains fingerprints, palmprints and iris images for some of the mentioned soldiers and terrorists.

Additions: according to this slide, thousands of people on the army watchlist are linked to biometric data in the first half of this year

Additions: according to this slide, thousands of people on the army watchlist are linked to biometric data in the first half of this year

Additions: according to this slide, thousands of people on the army watchlist are linked to biometric data in the first half of this year

Under supervision: data from face recognition held by the US army relate to terrorists in war zones and troops from allied countries training with US troops (photo of the file)

Under supervision: data from face recognition held by the US army relate to terrorists in war zones and troops from allied countries training with US troops (photo of the file)

Under supervision: data from face recognition held by the US army relate to terrorists in war zones and troops from allied countries training with US troops (photo of the file)

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Krizay told the guests at the conference that biometrics can also be used to secure access to military documents and physical space.

& # 39; If Wikileaks can get more than half a million of our reports, what can China or Russia do? & He asked.

He also speculated that artificial intelligence could help the government to collect large amounts of data.

According to one of Krizay's slides, thousands of people on the army watchlist were linked to biometric data in the first half of this year.

Lieutenant General Michael Barbero, a former head of the Joint IED Defeat Organization, described biometric techniques as a & # 39; game changer & # 39 ;.

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& # 39; These capacities remove the greatest defense of violent extremists – anonymity & he said.

However, sharing data with the Department of Homeland Security has proven difficult because they use different computer software.

There have also been a number of concerns about possible racial and gender prejudices in face recognition technology.

In 2017, a report warned that China was racing to use its own AI technology to develop superior face recognition systems.

The Chinese People's Liberation Army has already invested in a series of AI-related projects.

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