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Half of pregnant women at risk for preeclampsia miss out on aspirin which can help prevent it

Half of pregnant women at risk for preeclampsia miss aspirin which may help prevent the condition, experts say

  • Aspirins have been used for decades to reduce the risk of preeclampsia
  • Every year, 23,000 pregnant women in the UK suffer from the condition
  • Women at risk of preeclampsia should start taking preventive low doses of aspirin after 12 weeks of pregnancy

Half of pregnant women at risk of preeclampsia miss out on preventive aspirin, experts say.

Aspirin has been used for decades to reduce the risk of preeclampsia, leading to dangerously high blood pressure and threatening the lives of both mother and baby.

Every year, 23,000 pregnant women in Britain suffer from the condition and it is the leading cause of premature birth and stillbirth in the country.

National guidelines recommend that women at risk of preeclampsia start using low-dose aspirin preventively after 12 weeks of pregnancy. But in the British Medical Journal, advisory midwife Dr. Joanna Girling wrote, “Why is it that despite convincing evidence for its benefits and safety, more than 50 percent of eligible pregnant women never receive aspirin?”

Half of pregnant women at risk of preeclampsia miss preventive aspirin (file photo)

Half of pregnant women at risk of preeclampsia miss preventive aspirin (file photo)

Midwives cannot prescribe an appropriate dose of aspirin, so they should advise women to see their doctor and request a prescription.

Dr. Girling at West Middlesex University Hospital in West London said this low shot could be reversed if pharmacists were allowed to prescribe the drug.

She added: ‘The cost of a low dose of aspirin purchased from a pharmacy is less than £ 5 for a six-month supply and much cheaper than the unnecessary brand-related dietary nutrients and supplements many women choose to buy. ‘

Midwives who cannot provide aspirin should advise the woman to go to her doctor to get a prescription from a pharmacist, using at least three more episodes of patient and health work time.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, so few women achieve this within a week of the booking appointment.

“If we want to take seriously the introduction of a nationally recommended evidence-based, life-saving, low-cost intervention, what about developing a national PGD [patient group direction] to enable community pharmacists to deliver a low dose of aspirin to women at risk of preeclampsia? ‘

Midwives are unable to prescribe an appropriate dose of aspirin, so they should advise women to see their GP and request a prescription (file photo)

Midwives are unable to prescribe an appropriate dose of aspirin, so they should advise women to see their GP and request a prescription (file photo)

Midwives are unable to prescribe an appropriate dose of aspirin, so they should advise women to see their GP and request a prescription (file photo)

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