Half frizzy, arrogant and stupid … that's our transfer window

The hero of the transfer window now happened? Not Daniel Levy or Ed Woodward; no Marina Granovskaia, or any of the self-styled executive players at the top of the richest league in the world.

Agent Diego Godin. Smartest boy in the room. It was he who, as the clock approached, discovered an opportunity to exploit and expose the folly of the early closing of English football and use it to the fullest.

He made a call to Manchester United. Ridiculous, in the grip of Manchester United's panic, unable to land a suitable half-center, given the summer to do so.

Manchester United failed a day-long race to sign Diego Godin of Atlético de Madrid

Manchester United failed a day-long race to sign Diego Godin of Atlético de Madrid

Manchester United failed a day-long race to sign Diego Godin of Atlético de Madrid

José Mourinho could not return the center he was looking for before closing the window

José Mourinho could not return the center he was looking for before closing the window

José Mourinho could not return the center he was looking for before closing the window

Would they, he, want to be interested in his client, a player who, at 32, had not played even one of his 576 games for a club outside of a Spanish-speaking country and had rejected Manchester City three years ago? United, with options and time running out quickly, he said they would.

And so the story leaked that United was behind Godin, and the agent could go to Godin's club, Atlético de Madrid, and say he had an interest in Old Trafford, which means that his client got what he wanted from the principle: that it was new, improved contract with Atlético for an approximate value of £ 6.74 million per year.

Ah, well played, sir (or lady, considering that Godin's sister, Lucia, is also part of her management team). But, really, it was too easy, right?

So, did the transfer window reduce agent cuts and transfer fees? Do not.

Did the appalling and inflationary last minute pandemonium prevent? No. Did he prevent Tottenham from destabilizing a young player at another club after his season began? No. Will you avoid further uncertainty in the future until the end of August, at least? No. Your squadron is your squadron? Do not.

Was it the most stupid, arrogant, ill-conceived, half-stooped, half-baked plan and brains invented by a group of supposedly competent individuals? Yes, yes, a thousand times yes.

Take Chelsea. They sold a goalkeeper to Real Madrid for £ 35 million and bought one from Athletic Bilbao for £ 71.6m. Penalty fee. That happen. The clubs improve and it costs.

Except the Chelsea goalkeeper who has sold, Thibaut Courtois has made 65 international appearances, played 47 times in Europe, reached a World Cup semifinal, played in a Champions League final, won two European trophies, won the league in England and Spain, was named goalkeeper of the year in Belgium, Spain and England, won the Gold Glove of the World Cup and made a team of the Champions League of the season.

Chelsea bought Kepa Arrizabalaga (above) from Athletic Bilbao to replace Thibaut Courtois

Chelsea bought Kepa Arrizabalaga (above) from Athletic Bilbao to replace Thibaut Courtois

Chelsea bought Kepa Arrizabalaga (above) from Athletic Bilbao to replace Thibaut Courtois

And the goalkeeper for whom they have paid twice as much, Kepa Arrizabalaga, has never played in Europe, has never won a trophy in the top level and has played once for Spain.

When David de Gea's form began to fail in Russia this summer, it was not about promoting Arrizabalaga. He was considered too raw. And, as we know, Courtois wanted to leave. That's not Chelsea's fault. What is their fault is that they voted for a system that left them little time, which means that the premium they paid for their replacement was ridiculously inflationary and a world record. Last year, Chelsea could have waited, negotiated, picked options, taken their time. Even if Rob Green had started against Huddersfield on Saturday, it would not have been the worst.

Instead, they have paid a higher dollar for a newbie.

Tottenham, meanwhile, became the first club in the Premier League since the summer window was introduced in 2003 to not buy a player. They could have taken Jack Grealish when the window opened and Aston Villa was mired in confusion, but they chose not to, because President Levy is too enamored with his reputation for running the most difficult business.

However, when the day of negotiation arrived, Villa had new owners who did not need the cash. Then, once again, the truncated window, which Tottenham supported, did nothing for Levy to act earlier, as was supposed. He still left it at the last minute, but with little of his previous influence. Any club that surrenders to a risky policy, any manager with instructions to sell before being able to buy, would always be at a disadvantage on August 9.

European clubs do not need to move yet. Now you can see the clubs in the Premier League that are the most important, Chelsea, for example, and withdraw their surplus at a low price once the deadline has expired.

There will be players looking for loan offers, permanent offers, expensive players who are not part of the 25-man Premier League team. That is to say, the English clubs now have two options: to continue paying the salaries of those who do not have the possibility of appearing, or to sell at a much lower price. Meanwhile, if Europe's elite really wants to hurt, well, the potential for that also persists.

Paul Pogba, who won the World Cup with France, has been linked to a move to Barcelona

Paul Pogba, who won the World Cup with France, has been linked to a move to Barcelona

Paul Pogba, who won the World Cup with France, has been linked to a move to Barcelona

Take Paul Pogba. If Barcelona wants it, what is there to prevent it from shaking from afar? What is to prevent them from making an offer or to encourage the player to make a transfer request? His relationship with José Mourinho does not seem perfect. He could begin to feel a wound; You may tire unexpectedly after your efforts in the World Cup.

And why should Barcelona obey the subtleties of some arbitrary term agreed by the owners in a foreign league? They have everything in August to do their business. They can milk the Premier League for what it's worth – possibly a hasty Everton £ 28.5m for Yerry Mina, whose appearances at World Cups with Colombia impressed considerably more than his six games with Barcelona last season – and disregard the pleas of Manchester United. to stay alone.

They could wreak havoc on Pogba for the next three weeks, if inclined. In fact, even if they did not really want the player, they could mess with a Champions League opponent just for the simple damage of it.

And everything could have been avoided with a little reflection. Have an advance transfer window, but convert it into a domestic rule. If the problem was the unscrupulous clubs that destabilized players belonging to rivals at home – and it was, considering that the overwhelming majority of last summer's disruptive transfer speculations involved domestic deals – then they only approve an embargo for those transfers, leaving that the clubs negotiate freely with Europe.

The national deals end on August 9, those that are beyond our borders remain the same. In a funny way, the highest levels of English football thought they were better and smarter than that. Just not as smart as Godin's people, obviously.

Mandarin dream is a nightmare

Is there any more discouraging loyalty than being a Blackpool fan? Most clubs, at least, like to wait a few games before staggering into crisis; Blackpool are the first to adopt the calamity.

They had just tied 0-0 with Wycombe Wanderers when manager Gary Bowyer resigned.

Gary Bowyer left Blackpool after only one game of his campaign 2018/19 League One

Gary Bowyer left Blackpool after only one game of his campaign 2018/19 League One

Gary Bowyer left Blackpool after only one game of his campaign 2018/19 League One

Like everyone else, I was exhausted by the ongoing ruin on Bloomfield Road, where the best part of £ 31.27m is still owed to former director Valeri Belokon, after it was discovered that the Oyston family had shamelessly devalued the club.

Another protest against the Oystons is planned on the Saturday before the game with Portsmouth, but anger is all that the fans have left, and with their grievances ignored for so long there is a growing danger that will eventually even turn into apathy. And then, what is there?

Curious truths about Pogba

Look at what José Mourinho really said about Paul Pogba, instead of just the consequences, and it really makes a lot of sense. He said Pogba was "absolutely brilliant" in the second part of the World Cup, which he was. He said that being a winner of the World Cup can only be positive, and it is also there.

The controversy was in the warnings, dripping through a series of interviews on the American tour. "I hope you understand why it was very good," Mourinho added. "It was the perfect habitat for a player like him to give his best, because it is closed for a month in which he can only think about football, isolated from commercial commitments and isolated from all possible influences."

Then, Pogba is better when he is eliminated from social networks and emojis and Pogbunnies and commercial, when he does not change his hair every two minutes, and dedicates himself completely to his football. Is not that what everyone has been saying?

Paul Pogba won applause for his performances as Les Bleus secured a second World Cup title

Paul Pogba won applause for his performances as Les Bleus secured a second World Cup title

Paul Pogba won applause for his performances as Les Bleus secured a second World Cup title

Gary Neville, Paul Scholes, Roy Keane, Graeme Souness, Ryan Giggs, Frank Lampard, Jamie Carragher, have all criticized Pogba for the past year, often suggesting he is not working hard enough or totally focused. And if he looks like a different player in the World Cup, it is possible that Mourinho is right and better in an environment without distractions.

The problem is that only Mourinho and Manchester United do not seem able to keep Pogba's attention. In Juventus, its value increased to £ 90 million thanks to four league titles; with France he won the World Cup. Now, back with United, he has welcomed the new season with a long post on Instagram that shows he cut his hair, incorporating two gold stars to represent the two World Cups in France. And here we go again.

Even if Mourinho is right about Pogba, what he can not adequately explain is why his player becomes a different person in Manchester. Maybe because the answer is too close to home.

Pep can polish Stones on a diamond in midfield

It can only be good news for England that Pep Guardiola considers playing against John Stones in a role in midfield at times this season.

As demonstrated by turning Fabian Delph into a left back last year, or turning Javier Mascherano into the center of Barcelona, ​​there is no one better than Guardiola to train a new position.

Other countries have players who can switch effortlessly between defensive and midfield roles, but not England. Rio Ferdinand grew up talking about his admiration for Matthias Sammer, from Germany, but never had the opportunity to follow his path despite having the ability.

Without a doubt, Stones has the potential and if Guardiola can get him out of it, Gareth Southgate will benefit too.

Manchester City star John Stones was used in the defensive midfield by Pep Guardiola at Wembley

Manchester City star John Stones was used in the defensive midfield by Pep Guardiola at Wembley

Manchester City star John Stones was used in the defensive midfield by Pep Guardiola at Wembley

Kroenke in control all the time

If you have something, it can not be stolen. Not for you So the idea of ​​Stan Kroenke taking over Arsenal is legalized stealing & # 39; – as stated by the Arsenal Supporters & # 39; Trust – is an exaggerated rhetoric.

For all intents and purposes, Kroenke was the owner of the Arsenal. He made the decisions, hired and fired, bought and sold. Once a year, those who spoke for the 3 percent of the club that did not control Kroenke or Alisher Usmanov had their day in the sun.

However, it was a symbolic resistance, nothing more. At the last General Shareholders' Meeting, 300 independent shareholders voted in favor of President Sir Chips Keswick, only for Kroenke to use his 67% vote to re-vote him. In 2015, Sir Chips was asked about the 3 million pounds Kroenke received in advisory consulting fees. His business and threatened to close the meeting if the matter was raised again.

The idea that the smallest shareholders of Arsenal provide a check, a balance or even have something to say is something far-fetched. The protests in the stadium, not in an annual executive meeting, were what caused the change of regime in Arsenal.

To all intents and purposes, Stan Kroenke (above) was the owner of Arsenal - he made the decision

To all intents and purposes, Stan Kroenke (above) was the owner of Arsenal - he made the decision

To all intents and purposes, Stan Kroenke (above) was the owner of Arsenal – he made the decision

The empty seats and the perpetual mood of dissent resounded louder than the futile insistence of the audience. Ultimately, it does not matter if Kroenke owns 67 percent or the lot.

In the field, the fans have a majority of 60,000: and that's where your voice is heard.

After having hidden the draw of the Copa Carabao in time zones and dark formats, the executive director Shaun Harvey repeats the formula with the highlights of the Football League.

These have been sold to a channel called Quest and so successful was their first broadcast that the League sent a notice on Thursday in the hope that media organizations would inform their readers where to get it.

Those who could place it – on my television after a channel called ID + 1 – were rewarded with a blackout, a distorted image, a crushed image and a studio that seemed to be assembled with the worst pay-out jobs in Accrington Stanley.

There are some very big clubs in the Championship, and they surely deserve better. In fact, it is better that the League has dug up a highly lucrative source of income, fined its own members millions for ambition, or Harvey could be considered to have no idea.

Shaun Harvey, CEO of EFL, speaks during the second day of the Soccerex Global Convention

Shaun Harvey, CEO of EFL, speaks during the second day of the Soccerex Global Convention

Shaun Harvey, CEO of EFL, speaks during the second day of the Soccerex Global Convention

Klopp can not hide from the new reality

Jurgen Klopp believes that Liverpool will have to deal with "crazy expectations" this season. Except that they are not crazy, they are perfectly realistic. It does not matter that Liverpool does not have a league title in the modern era.

This is not Liverpool in recent decades. There are many reasons to believe that, this season, if someone finishes ahead of Liverpool, the league wins.

Manchester City are the favorites, and rightly so. But they have a problem with Liverpool. In four meetings last season, Liverpool won three times. In fact, in the last 10 games between the clubs, Liverpool won seven and tied two.

That is, if Klopp can maintain that form and remain on City's shoulder for the rest of the season, it is very likely that he will win the league.

Liverpool coach Jurgen Klopp smiles during a training session before the new season

Liverpool coach Jurgen Klopp smiles during a training session before the new season

Liverpool coach Jurgen Klopp smiles during a training session before the new season

Equally, it is not unreasonable to expect big things from a club that reached the Champions League final last season, and the Europa League final two seasons before.

Liverpool have been reducing Klopp's scores for a while, on the pitch and, more recently, in the transfer market. They have invested heavily in key positions and in Mo Salah they have one of the best footballers in the world.

It is not naive to pretend that all these indicators create a crazy expectation. The belief in Liverpool's potential to challenge Manchester City, or anyone else this season, is completely rational.

The Newcastle players came in tenth last season and won £ 11 million in bonuses. And, yes, Mike Ashley should recognize the potential of his club and invest more, and this window has been another missed opportunity, but for a table in the middle of the table that really does not seem to be the worst job of the year.

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