Hairdresser flees from Tinder-date in a panic after she was informed that she & # 39; is infected & # 39; used to be

Amy Sharp (photo above) had talked to the man for three weeks before agreeing to meet him in person

Amy Sharp (photo above) had talked to the man for three weeks before agreeing to meet him in person

A barber was forced to flee a Tinder date after four men turned up to meet her in a pub parking garage.

Amy Sharp said she was eaten by the man & # 39; and has accused the police of their lack of care after saying that officers told her they could do nothing about the incident.

The 28-year-old had talked to a man she knew as James about three weeks ago with a dating app before she met him last Wednesday.

The couple agreed to meet in a pub at 9 p.m., but when Amy arrived, she said that four men got out of the white Mercedes that she should have been waiting for – and started approaching her in the parking garage.

Amy then called & # 39; James & # 39 ;, only for one of the men's phones to light up as he walked toward her – prompting her to realize that the account had used fake photos to lure her inside.

After fleeing and calling the police, Amy claimed the police had told her that James admitted that he had used a fake name and photos because he was afraid his girlfriend would find out – before the case was dropped .

The hair and makeup artist thinks she should be attacked for the police to do something and advocates changing the law on catfishing.

Catfishing uses a fake profile or identity to form a romantic relationship with someone online. It is not currently illegal in the UK.

The fake Tinder profile

The fake Tinder profile

James sent messages to Amy on the app

James sent messages to Amy on the app

The man had used a fake Tinder profile (left) and had exchanged messages with Amy. After the incident reports between Amy and & # 39; James & # 39; let Amy confront him before he admits & # 39; I don't know what I thought & # 39;

Amy, from Somerset, said she was very shocked by the incident and said it was clear that all four men were not coming to take her for a drink.

& # 39; With all Ted Bundy things, I know it's really extreme, but you just don't know how far it goes.

& # 39; The more I think about it, the scarier it is. It was clearly calculated. I don't want to know what would have happened if I got out of that car.

& # 39; At the end of the day there were four boys. I am 5ft3 and nine stone. Let's face it, they didn't all come for a drink.

Amy (photo) is now trying to warn others about Catfishing after she said the police couldn't help her

Amy (photo) is now trying to warn others about Catfishing after she said the police couldn't help her

Amy (photo) is now trying to warn others about Catfishing after she said the police couldn't help her

& # 39; Four boys go after a girl alone – I don't know what they were planning to do. They didn't all take me out to dinner. & # 39;

Amy added that she doesn't believe they would & # 39; kill & # 39; but added that she felt something was going to happen.

Amy, who claims she has been single & # 39; , James initially met on Tinder and found him & # 39; perfectly normal & # 39 ;.

The couple even talked on the phone every day for three weeks before agreeing to have a drink in Tiverton, Devon, 20 minutes from Amy's home.

Amy stopped in the parking garage of the pub and saw the white Mercedes that & # 39; James & # 39; had shown her attention – but with four men waiting for it.

In the run-up to the meeting, she said it was all perfectly normal and that he even had an Instagram and WhatsApp account and that all his photos matched.

& # 39; We spoke on the phone for three weeks. If I ever meet someone, I always first chat on the phone because you can feel him better.

& # 39; We found it good. He seemed very easy going and told me about his job, his family and his ex girlfriend.

& # 39; In the night he was in the car where he said he would be, a white Mercedes, and I parked across the street. I saw him get out of the car with three other people. & # 39;

She emphasized that the incident happened so quickly and that she first thought that one of the men looked like him before he found out he had used a fake photo because he already had a girlfriend.

& # 39; All men started walking to my car. I called his number and his phone lit up and I drove away. & # 39;

Quickly fleeing the stage and her blessings count that she had entered her car, Amy was so shocked that she called her boyfriend and then the police.

That night she couldn't stop thinking about what would have happened if she had got out of the car.

After the incident, the man apologized to Amy and said he was ashamed & # 39; felt with himself (WhatsApp messages sent to Amy, above)

After the incident, the man apologized to Amy and said he was ashamed & # 39; felt with himself (WhatsApp messages sent to Amy, above)

After the incident, the man apologized to Amy and said he was ashamed & # 39; felt with himself (WhatsApp messages sent to Amy, above)

After she drove away, Amy said the man called her and asked why she ran away, whereupon she asked why so many people had been with him.

& # 39; First he said he had a friend with him because he didn't know I was real, but then it turned out it was a fake name.

& # 39; He then said & # 39; okay, good, i'm Matthew. I used a fake name and fake photos because I have a girlfriend and I don't want her to know. & # 39;

& # 39; I wondered what he thought I was going to do when I got there and realized he was a different person.

& # 39; He sent me a message after I said: & # 39; what was your plan if you brought three other boys to go to a pub alone with a girl at night & # 39;

& # 39; He asked me not to call the police and admitted: & # 39; I am disgusted by my thoughts and behavior tonight & # 39 ;.

& # 39; For me he was going to do something very unreliable. I told him you're sick. Do not contact me again & # 39; and blocked his number. I was so angry. & # 39;

After the incident, Amy called her friend and said the more she thought about it, the more she realized how & # 39; unreliable the situation was & # 39 ;.

After calling 101, Amy claims the incident was handed over to the Devon and Cornwall police before it was passed on to its local Avon forces and Somerset police.

Avon and Somerset Police have informed Amy that it was not a crime to use a fake profile when dating websites.

She says a police officer sent her a text message saying that he had spoken to the man who admitted that his name was not James, but claimed he was the only one in the car.

Amy has now wondered why it was not looked further and hopes to raise awareness among catfishes about dating apps.

Amy said: & # 39; The police asked & # 39; did he touch you? & # 39; They said that unless he had really attacked me, he would not have committed a crime.

& # 39; There is no law against the use of fake names online and the use of fake profiles. He actually said that if I were under 18, it would be illegal, but since I am 28, it is not. & # 39;

Amy asked the police what would have happened if he met someone else who didn't have a car.

& # 39; I told the police & # 39; what if he had done this before? Is there no law against luring girls under false pretenses? & # 39;

& # 39; He was lying, there was not one person in the car. I can't believe they just believed what he said and didn't check with me.

& # 39; I replied saying & # 39; that is a complete lie & # 39 ;, and they did not return to me. & # 39;

After posting her warning online, Amy said she had received many endorsements (above) with some people who even said they were planning to meet the same person

After posting her warning online, Amy said she had received many endorsements (above) with some people who even said they were planning to meet the same person

After posting her warning online, Amy said she had received many endorsements (above) with some people who even said they were planning to meet the same person

Since posting her warning online, Amy claims she has been bombarded with & # 39; of people who have also been the victims of false profiles – some even claim to have spoken to the same man.

She now says she wants to raise awareness of the problem, and emphasizes that many people have come forward to say that they have been in contact with the same person.

& # 39; I have received about seven or eight messages from people who said they had spoken with this man, but with different names, different places, the same photo.

& # 39; I have been bombarded with messages from women who said they had the same thing with another man.

& # 39; People need to know this is the case.

& # 39; I have met many people from the internet, I always tell someone where I am going. I would never meet anyone in a row. & # 39;

The Devon and Cornwall police were approached for comment, but did not report the incident and said it was a matter for the victim's local forces, Avon and Somerset Police.

An Avon and Somerset Police spokesperson said: & # 39; We have spoken with both parties and there is no evidence that criminal offenses have been committed. & # 39;

A spokesperson for the Online Dating Association said: “It is worrying to hear what has been reported.

& # 39; No one would make an appointment with one guy and somehow approve of others to pop up.

& # 39; More than a third of all new relationships start online and sites and apps are part of everyday life for millions of us.

& # 39; That's why operators work to check profiles, block troublemakers, and respond to notifications of things that don't matter.

& # 39; We do not speak for individual operators – whether they are members or not.

& # 39; Parts of the Match group are members and have greatly supported our work on safety and other standards.

& # 39; Tinder is currently not sure that profile checks and reports are in place. & # 39;

Tinder was approached for comment.

HOW CAN YOU CHECK WHETHER YOU ARE AFFISHED?

Dating apps and online websites are plagued by fraudulent profiles, also known as & # 39; catfishes & # 39; called.

& # 39; Catfishing & # 39; originated as a term for the process of luring people into false relationships, but it is also about people spreading false information about themselves in general.

These profiles often use images of another person to give users the opportunity to pretend to be someone else to get a date or to scam money off a lonely person.

Fortunately, there are certain ways to check if these profiles are real people or if they are fake accounts –

1. Google reverse image search

This is probably the most valuable tool for catching a catfish and can be done through Google.

To give the process a kick start, people only have to right-click on the photos that generate their suspensions, copy the URL and paste it into the folder images.google.com.

The search engine will search to see if the image has been used elsewhere.

If you see the image associated with another person by the person you're talking to in your dating app, you've probably met a catfish!

2. Use an app called Veracity

It is useful for dating sites such as Tinder, Bumble, and Grindr, as it allows images from Dropbox or Camera roll (or similar) to be compared with all matching results.

Load the app and then select a screenshot of the profile of the suspicious dating app in your movie role to start the search.

The app will tell you if someone else's photo is.

3. Check their Facebook

Almost everyone who has a profile on a dating site has a Facebook account (most dating apps require users to have one!), So it's always advisable to track your potential lover on other forms of social media.

4. Google them

Google and other search engines have an extensive repertoire and most people turn up in a search query.

In this time it is unusual that someone has nothing on Google.

Search for them or their relatives, things they have said or posted in the past. If there is nothing, it should call alarm bells.

5. Skype / FaceTime / Video Chat

For prospective romantic appointments, it is essential to see the face of someone you are talking to virtually.

6. Money

Anyone who asks for money online or through an app is probably fraud.

This is probably a scam and should immediately produce red flags.

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