Great-grandmother is said to have been banned from a boy who had begged not to be reunited with parents

The great-grandmother of a Californian boy who died under suspicious circumstances while in the care of the parents claimed that she was forbidden to attend his funeral after accusing his mother and father of child abuse.

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Eva Hernandez, who often cared for four-year-old Noah Cuatro in Los Angeles, made the allegation of abuse after the authorities began investigating the child's death on July 6, citing trauma to his body that was not consistent with drowning which according to his parents took place.

As a result, Noah & # 39; s parents, Jose and Ursula Cuatro, allegedly forbid Hernandez the Thursday to attend the toddler's private funeral at San Fernando Mission Cemetery in Los Angeles, Fox 11 reported.

Eva Hernandez (center) said she was allowed to prohibit her great-grandson Noah Cuatro's funeral access on Thursday after filing child abuse claims against his parents

Eva Hernandez (center) said she was allowed to prohibit her great-grandson Noah Cuatro's funeral access on Thursday after filing child abuse claims against his parents

Noah, 4, died on July 6 after his parents claimed to have nearly drowned in the pool of the family's apartment complex. Authorities said there was trauma on his body that was not consistent with drowning and are now investigating his death

Noah, 4, died on July 6 after his parents claimed to have nearly drowned in the pool of the family's apartment complex. Authorities said there was trauma on his body that was not consistent with drowning and are now investigating his death

Noah, 4, died on July 6 after his parents claimed to have nearly drowned in the pool of the family's apartment complex. Authorities said there was trauma on his body that was not consistent with drowning and are now investigating his death

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Civil rights activist Najee Ali held a silent protest during the service on behalf of Hernandez and held up a photo of the boy with the words & # 39; Justice for Noah & # 39; embellished above.

& # 39; It was a week ago that Eva Hernandez, the grandmother of 4-year-old Noah Cuatro, who had been sexually assaulted and murdered by his parents, asked me to keep a photo of Noah up at his funeral because she was banned by his killer because he confirmed child abuse and demanding justice for Noah, & # 39; Ali wrote on Facebook. & # 39; Today I kept my word. & # 39;

Noah's parents took him to the hospital & # 39; noon on July 5 and claimed that he was nearly drowned by the pool of their apartment complex. But medical staff soon became skeptical about the story after finding signs of trauma on the body of the four-year-old.

Noah died in the hospital the next day.

Authorities have not yet released Noah's autopsy findings, but lawyer Brian Claypool said KABC that a detective told Hernandez that no water had been found in the boy's lungs and that he had bruises on his body.

Noah (with parents Jose and Ursula Cuatro) is said to have been in and out of foster care since birth. Authorities went to court in May for a removal order

Noah (with parents Jose and Ursula Cuatro) is said to have been in and out of foster care since birth. Authorities went to court in May for a removal order

Noah (with parents Jose and Ursula Cuatro) is said to have been in and out of foster care since birth. Authorities went to court in May for a removal order

Hernandez (photo), who often cared for Noah, said she had cared for the boy for the past two years and begged him not to go back to his parents in November 2018
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Hernandez (photo), who often cared for Noah, said she had cared for the boy for the past two years and begged him not to go back to his parents in November 2018

Hernandez (photo), who often cared for Noah, said she had cared for the boy for the past two years and begged him not to go back to his parents in November 2018

Noah depicted with his mother, Ursula

Noah depicted with his mother, Ursula

Hernandez said that Noah & # 39; s (pictured) attitude had changed during the nine months that he was in the care of his parents

Hernandez said that Noah & # 39; s (pictured) attitude had changed during the nine months that he was in the care of his parents

Hernandez said that Noah's behavior had changed during the nine months that he was in the care of his parents. He is depicted on the left with his mother, Ursula, and on an undated photo on the right

Civil rights activist Najee Ali (left) and his son are depicted during their silent protest outside Noah's funeral Thursday. They protested because Hernandez had been denied access
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Civil rights activist Najee Ali (left) and his son are depicted during their silent protest outside Noah's funeral Thursday. They protested because Hernandez had been denied access

Civil rights activist Najee Ali (left) and his son are depicted during their silent protest outside Noah's funeral Thursday. They protested because Hernandez had been denied access

Although no arrests were made in connection with his death, Noah's parents would now be investigated.

Just days after his death, Hernandez spoke to several news channels telling reporters that Noah had been taken out of his parents' care a few times, only when he was just a baby.

He supposedly spent the first few months of his life in and out of foster care before Hernandez could get custody of him.

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She took care of him for six months until Noah was allowed to return to his parents' care. But only a year later, Jose and Ursula once again lost custody of officials who found that Noah had been neglected.

Police documents claim that he was so malnourished that he could not walk.

After another stay in foster care, Hernandez took care of him for two years until last November, when he pleaded not to go back to his mother Ursula and father.

& # 39; I said to social workers: & # 39; Please, he doesn't want to leave. He wants to stay here. He begged me & # 39;, & # 39; Hernandez said KTLA. & # 39; He would hold me and say: & # 39; Don't send me back, grandma. & # 39; I do not know. I could do nothing. I just had to send it back. & # 39;

Noah was returned to his parents last November and Hernandez wept that by the time she saw him again six months later, the little boy clearly needed help.

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In the nine months back under the care of Jose and Ursula, Hernandez claimed that the boy's behavior had changed completely.

She also said the boy seemed nervous and hesitant in the presence of his mother. Other family members shared Hernandez's concerns that he was not well cared for, she said.

& # 39; He was no longer the same little boy, & # 39; Hernandez continued. & # 39; He looked so sad and withdrawn.

& # 39; He didn't have the chance. She just looked at him and he didn't want to say anything. He would say, "Grandma," he would just close. I kept saying, "What's the matter? Tell me, honey," and he wouldn't say. & # 39;

Between March and April of this year, several reports of suspected child abuse came in which Noah came to light, with one report claiming that the child with bruises on his back had gone to the hospital.

The following month an employee filed a 26-page request to remove Noah again from Jose and Ursula's custody, after allegations that the father of the boy Ursula and their children had been kicked in public.

Although a judge granted the request, Noah was never sent back to provide care.

Childcare went to court in May to look for a removal order for Noah (photo) after allegations that his father had kicked him, his mother and two siblings in public

Childcare went to court in May to look for a removal order for Noah (photo) after allegations that his father had kicked him, his mother and two siblings in public

Authorities did not remove the boy from his parents' custody despite the order given

Authorities did not remove the boy from his parents' custody despite the order given

Childcare had gone to court in May to seek a removal order for Noah (photo) after allegations that his father had kicked him, his mother and two siblings in public. But the authorities did not remove the boy from his parents' custody despite the order given

The swimming pool in the apartment complex where Noah's parents said he almost drowned
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The swimming pool in the apartment complex where Noah's parents said he almost drowned

The swimming pool in the apartment complex where Noah's parents said he almost drowned

Hernandez believes that if the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) had responded to her complaint in a different way, Noah might still be alive.

She asked them to visit the house unannounced, but they warned the parents that they were coming and when they checked everything seemed fine.

Noah had a baby brother of one month, a sister of two years and an older brother who has also been in and out of foster care.

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& # 39; If they had taken him away from there, he would still be there, & # 39; Hernandez said. & # 39; The children have no voice. & # 39;

The Sheriff Department of Los Angeles County has since started an investigation into the boy's death.

There was no lifeguard at the pool of the Mountain Shadows apartments, and detectives search for security footage and speak to witnesses.

Noah & # 39; s parent made the 911 and the authorities said that other family members were present at that time. His cause of death has not been explained.

The three other children have been removed from the house of which the neighbors say the family moved in a month ago.

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It is the third high-profile case with a boy from Antelope Valley who died in a DCFS home placement. Anthony Avalos, 10, of Lancaster died in June 2018 and Gabriel Fernandez, eight of Palmdale died in May 2013.

The Los Angeles County supervisor, Kathryn Barger, said that more details will be available when they are ready: & # 39; It is important to know the facts. If you talk about it not happening fast enough, this is a deep dive … just like in all our business, like with Gabriel, like with Anthony. & # 39;

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