Global warming is happening at a speed and scale & # 39; unprecedented & # 39; in the past 2000 years

Global warming is happening at a speed and scale & # 39; unprecedented & # 39; in the last 2,000 years, experts say

  • Researchers studied nearly 700 & # 39; proxy records & # 39; of temperature changes on earth
  • That includes ice cores, tree rings, pollen fossils, boreholes, corals and sediment
  • They discovered that there was no global climate change before the 20th century
  • Today's warming currently affects 98 percent of the Earth's surface
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Global warming is happening at a speed and scale that is & # 39; unprecedented & # 39; has been in the last 2,000 years, scientists say.

Although warmer and cooler periods have been noticed since the records started, new research shows that these deviations were limited to specific geographical regions.

Which includes the & # 39; Little Ice Age & # 39 ;, which ended around 1850 – a time when fairs were held on the frozen River Thames.

It also includes an unusually warm period in the Middle Ages, when grapes were often grown in England.

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New research has shown that earlier periods of higher temperatures were regionally based and covered no more than 40 percent of the Earth's surface.

For comparison: today's warming currently affects 98 percent of the Earth's surface, experts say.

Global warming is happening at a speed and scale that is & # 39; unprecedented & # 39; has been in the last 2,000 years, scientists say. Although warmer and cooler periods have been noticed since the records started, new research shows that these deviations were limited to certain geographical regions & # 39; s

Global warming is happening at a speed and scale that is & # 39; unprecedented & # 39; has been in the last 2,000 years, scientists say. Although warmer and cooler periods have been noticed since the records started, new research shows that these deviations were limited to certain geographical regions & # 39; s

A team of researchers led by the University of Bern in Switzerland studied nearly 700 & # 39; proxy records & # 39; of temperature changes in the history of the earth.

Sources of this information include studies of ice cores, tree rings, fossilized pollen, boreholes, corals and sediments of lakes and oceans.

They discovered that before the 20th century, global climate changes did not occur as previously thought, but instead were limited in the regions that they met.

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Experts say the findings reinforce the role of human activity on the climate and claims from & # 39; deniers & # 39; who insist that the rising temperatures experienced by the world are part of a natural cycle.

New research has shown that earlier periods of higher temperatures were regionally based and covered no more than 40 percent of the Earth's surface. For comparison: today's warming currently affects 98 percent of the world's surface, experts say (stock image)

New research has shown that earlier periods of higher temperatures were regionally based and covered no more than 40 percent of the Earth's surface. For comparison: today's warming currently affects 98 percent of the world's surface, experts say (stock image)

New research has shown that earlier periods of higher temperatures were regionally based and covered no more than 40 percent of the Earth's surface. For comparison: today's warming currently affects 98 percent of the world's surface, experts say (stock image)

The study investigated climate change over the last 2,000 years that were thought to be global in nature, such as the medieval warm period from 800 to 1200 AD and the small ice age between 1300 and 1850.

It discovered that warmer and cooler periods before the industrial revolution, when human activities began to extinguish large amounts of greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels, not & # 39; globally coherent & # 39; goods.

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For example, in the Little Ice Age the coldest temperatures were seen in the central and eastern Pacific during the 15th century, in Northwestern Europe and Southeastern North America during the 17th century, and above other Regions & # in the mid-19th century. 39; s.

The researchers also said the previous periods are consistent with the natural variability of the climate.

But rapid warming in the last 150 years is very different, with the hottest period of the last two millennia in the 20th century for more than 98 percent of the world.

One of the authors, Dr. Nathan Steiger, of Columbia University in the US, said: & # 39; There is a globally coherent warm period that is very different from what we see in the past and that coherence cannot be explained by the natural variability of the climate.

& # 39; In the past we have seen large patterns that are consistent with natural variability, but that is not the case with the current period. & # 39; Ends

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The full findings were published in a paper published in the journal Nature.

WHAT WAS THE & # 39; SMALL ICE TIME & # 39 ;?

An artist & # 39; s impression of the Little Ice Age

An artist & # 39; s impression of the Little Ice Age

An artist & # 39; s impression of the Little Ice Age

Around the 17th century the earth experienced a prolonged cooling period called the small ice age that brought cooler-than-average temperatures to much of the northern hemisphere.

It is said to have lasted from the 16th to the 19th centuries, although some claim it started even earlier.

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It was not a real ice age, but brought cold temperatures in three intervals from the middle of 1600 to 1800.

In Europe and North America, this meant colder winters that in some cases destroyed farms and villages with advancing glaciers.

Rivers also froze at many locations and "frost fairs" were held along the River Thames.

Changes in sea ice disrupted travel and shipping around Iceland and the destruction of crops led to years of famine in some parts of Europe.

The & # 39; Small ice age & # 39; was not a true ice age, but brought cold temperatures in three intervals from the mid-1600s to the 19th century. Rivers also froze at many locations and "frost fairs" were held along the River Thames

The & # 39; Small ice age & # 39; was not a true ice age, but brought cold temperatures in three intervals from the mid-1600s to the 19th century. Rivers also froze at many locations and "frost fairs" were held along the River Thames

The & # 39; Small ice age & # 39; was not a true ice age, but brought cold temperatures in three intervals from the mid-1600s to the 19th century. Rivers also froze at many locations and "frost fairs" were held along the River Thames

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) sciencetech (t) climate change – & – global-warming

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