Girl lies down and uses her cellphone on the RAILWAY where trains rush past at 85mph

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A shocking image shows a teenage girl lying in the middle of a railway track with trains passing at high speeds of 140 km/h.

The photo, taken last month by CCTV at a level crossing at Horsham in West Sussex, was shared by Network Rail to encourage children to stay away from the tracks.

The teen appears to be casually using her cell phone with another girl standing next to her, despite the unbelievable dangers of trains speeding past at 85mph.

Network Rail hopes to highlight the risks and potentially fatal consequences of treading train tracks by sharing the horrific photo.

A shocking CCTV image taken last month at a level crossing at Horsham in West Sussex shows a teenage girl lying in the middle of a railway track with trains speeding past 85 miles per hour.

A shocking CCTV image taken last month at a level crossing at Horsham in West Sussex shows a teenage girl lying in the middle of a railway track with trains speeding past 85 miles per hour.

Other nail-biting footage released by Network Rail showed quad bikers and dirt bikers in Shornemead, near Gravesend, last May.

Other nail-biting footage released by Network Rail showed quad bikers and dirt bikers in Shornemead, near Gravesend, last May.

Other nail-biting footage released by Network Rail showed quad bikers and dirt bikers in Shornemead, near Gravesend, last May.

The children, whose identities have been obscured in the CCTV footage, were spoken to by transport police officers, the railway company confirmed.

Other images released Tuesday showed two boys walking on the train tracks in Bewbush, near Crawley, and quad bikers entering the site in May last year in Shornemead, near Gravesend.

The dangerous sightings come after figures released in March showed there was a 40 per cent increase in offenses committed by young people in South East London, Surrey and Sussex, after the region emerged from its first national lockdown.

Vandalism and trespassing on railway lines is illegal and according to National Rail, people could be taken to court and fined £1,000.

Vincent van der Hoeven, head of route quality, health, safety and environment at Netwerk Rail: ‘We really need to make children and their parents aware of the dangers of entering the track.

“We’re doing our best to get the message across to schools and social media through our Parallel Lines film and You Vs Train campaign.”

Last October, Network Rail released a photo of a bride and groom performing a photo shoot on a railway track near Whitby, North Yorkshire

Last October, Network Rail released a photo of a bride and groom performing a photo shoot on a railway track near Whitby, North Yorkshire

Last October, Network Rail released a photo of a bride and groom performing a photo shoot on a railway track near Whitby, North Yorkshire

Earlier this year, CCTV released by Network Rail (pictured) once again showed a woman lying on the track posing for photos - despite the dangers

Earlier this year, CCTV released by Network Rail (pictured) once again showed a woman lying on the track posing for photos - despite the dangers

Earlier this year, CCTV released by Network Rail (pictured) once again showed a woman lying on the track posing for photos – despite the dangers

Network Rail said more than 5,000 incidents were recorded between June and September, with in many cases people using the railway as a backdrop for photos (above)

Network Rail said more than 5,000 incidents were recorded between June and September, with in many cases people using the railway as a backdrop for photos (above)

Network Rail said more than 5,000 incidents were recorded between June and September, with in many cases people using the railway as a backdrop for photos (above)

Nicola Dooris, community safety manager on the southeastern route, said: ‘Unfortunately, we have seen an increase in the number of young people messing around on the tracks during the closure.

‘On that part of the track, trains often travel at a speed of 130 km/h and at that speed, unlike cars, trains can take hundreds of meters to stop – a fact that many young people don’t realize.

“Using cameras in this way often allows me to track down and talk to young people, which I’d much rather do than help our employees deal with the aftermath of young people being murdered.”

How to safely use a level crossing

Network Rail previously produced a guide about the safe use of a level crossing.

  • Concentrate – you can easily get distracted, especially by telephones, music and conversations.
  • Stand still, look and listen.
  • Follow the signs and instructions.
  • Check both ways before crossing – if a train is coming, don’t cross. Understand the warnings (lights, barriers, alarms).
  • Visit pedestrian crossings for more information.
  • Cross quickly, keep children close and dogs on a lead.

In April, two women were pictured walking past a live railway with a buggy and child in tow.

The nail-biting photo captured the seemingly unwitting woman and child as they took a shortcut along the Keighley and Worth Valley Railway (KWVR) in West Yorkshire, which was famous in Edith Nesbit’s 1970 film version, The Railway Children.

But these women aren’t the first to break the rules and risk their lives playing on live railroad tracks.

Last October, Network Rail released a photo of a bride and groom performing a photo shoot on a railroad track to warn of a new craze for railroad crossing photos.

Just a month later, another shocking incident was recorded when a video showed a jogger wearing headphones nearly being swept away by a train after crossing the track, oblivious to the approaching locomotive.

Earlier this year, Network Rail again showed a woman laying on the track posing for photos – despite the dangers.

The woman, dressed in a brightly colored jacket, can be seen sprawling across the rails at a level crossing in East Sussex as her companion snaps photos.

The stunt at the intersection – where trains pass at speeds of up to 70 mph – was labeled “unthinkably stupid” by police at the time.

Network Rail said more than 5,000 incidents were recorded between June and September last year, with many cases where people used the railway as a backdrop for photos.

Speaking of the wider dangers of entering railways, BTP Inspector Bryan O’Neill has previously said: ‘The railway is full of hidden dangers.

“Too often we have seen the tragic consequences of young people ignoring the warnings about treading the track and taking risks that have resulted in horrific injuries or death, so it is vital that parents play their part and ensure that they know where their children are and what they are doing.’

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