WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Germany scraps & # 39; tampon tax & # 39; after menstrual products are no longer classified as & # 39; luxury & # 39; articles

Germany scraps & # 39; tampon tax & # 39; after menstrual products are no longer classified as & # 39; luxury & # 39; articles

  • Germany has abolished its 19 percent VAT on feminine sanitary products
  • It was one of the highest in the EU, the same charge as on cigarettes and liquor
  • Tampons are now taxed at seven percent, the same as food and bus fares
  • British women pay a five percent tax on tampons, for which the EU has a mandate

Germany has its & # 39; tampon tax & # 39; abolished and menstrual products removed from the bracket & # 39; luxury goods & # 39; including cigarettes and liquor.

This highest tax rate of 19 percent is more than on books and train tickets and was one of the highest taxes on tampons in Europe.

After years of petitions, the German parliament ruled last week that the 19 percent tax had to be abolished and replaced by the basic VAT rate of 7 percent.

From 1 January tampons will be brought in line with other basic items such as food, bus fares and flowers.

Germany raised tampons to 19 percent, more than books and train tickets, making it one of the highest for feminine sanitary products in Europe

Germany raised tampons to 19 percent, more than books and train tickets, making it one of the highest for feminine sanitary products in Europe

The German Parliament or the Bundestag had consistently rejected petitions to lower the tax rate for feminine sanitary products and claimed that it was in no way discriminatory.

Campaigners blamed the fact that more than two-thirds of the house were men.

It took a petition of more than 200,000 signatures to change this summer.

Campaigner Nanna-Josephine Roloff told CNN: & # 39; It is the women who bear these costs – and periods are not a luxury for women. & # 39;

The consultant from Hamburg tweeted last Thursday: & # 39; We made it: Germany will stop taxing menstrual products by 2020. I cry. & # 39;

In the UK, women pay five percent VAT on tampons, which the government has long been striving to abandon.

Campaigners had blamed the predominantly male Bundestag for the high tax rate on sanitary products for women

Campaigners had blamed the predominantly male Bundestag for the high tax rate on sanitary products for women

Campaigners had blamed the predominantly male Bundestag for the high tax rate on sanitary products for women

However, the EU requires women to pay this rate for sanitary products.

The tampon tax was indeed a bottleneck in Boris Johnson's negotiations with Brussels last month, because the Block wanted Northern Ireland to continue to pay five percent like the Republic.

It took two personal phone calls from the prime minister to Jean-Claude Juncker, chief of the European Commission, for a special & # 39; deviation & # 39; for sanitary products.

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail

Comments
Loading...