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Firemen, police and RSPCA close the street and use the extension ladder to save the baby SEAGULL

Firemen, police and RSPCA close the street and use the extension ladder to rescue the baby SEAGULL on a roof

  • Emergency services were called after the affected gull was trapped in the gutter
  • Witnesses said the street was closed during the rescue in Plymouth, Devon
  • It was released by firefighters and, after being checked by the RSPCA, flew away

Firemen, police and RSPCA closed a street and used a ladder to rescue a baby seagull on a roof.

Emergency services were called after the affected bird was locked in a gutter and seemed upset.

Witnesses said that the street in Plymouth, Devon, was closed because a massive rescue operation was launched to help the gull.

It was finally released by firefighters and after being checked by the RSPCA it flew away.

Emergency services were called after the affected bird was locked in a gutter and seemed upset

Emergency services were called after the affected bird was locked in a gutter and seemed upset

Witnesses said the street in Plymouth, Devon was closed because of a massive rescue operation to help the bird

Witnesses said the street in Plymouth, Devon was closed because of a massive rescue operation to help the bird

Witnesses said the street in Plymouth, Devon was closed because of a massive rescue operation to help the bird

A neighbor, unwilling to be called, wondered if the extent of the rescue was a proper use of taxpayers’ money.

They said, “It was really unusual to see our whole road closed to save a gull.

“There was a concerned family on the street. It was in one house and then went to a neighbor’s house.

The family first called the RSPCA and 24 hours later the fire brigade showed up. They used a ladder, like a hanging crane, to get it down. ‘

The witness, who filmed the rescue, said it took place around 7 p.m. on Sunday.

It was finally released by firefighters and after being checked by the RSPCA it was allowed to fly away

It was finally released by firefighters and after being checked by the RSPCA it was allowed to fly away

It was finally released by firefighters and after being checked by the RSPCA it was allowed to fly away

A firefighter stands on the road as the truck lifts his colleague to take care of the affected bird

A firefighter stands on the road as the truck lifts his colleague to take care of the affected bird

A firefighter stands on the road as the truck lifts his colleague to take care of the affected bird

They added, “The total cost to the taxpayer to save a baby seagull must have been pretty high.

“They went up with a crane and closed the road with bollards. The bird did not come immediately and it had to be poked and went crazy.

“A woman from the fire brigade then took it, put it in a box and gave it to the RSPCA.

“They checked to make sure it had no broken wing or problems and eventually it was released.

“I don’t think this is a good use of tax money and I think most people agree.

“They could have just let this baby seagull run its course and I’m sure it eventually flew away on its own.”

MailOnline has approached the Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service, the Devon and Cornwall Police and the RSPCA for comment.

The bird is shown sitting in the gutter where it got trapped and had to be rescued by the emergency services

The bird is shown sitting in the gutter where it got trapped and had to be rescued by the emergency services

The bird is shown sitting in the gutter where it got trapped and had to be rescued by the emergency services

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