Few are arrested after 74 dead cats and 150 live cats are found in their & # 39; smelly & # 39; House

A couple from Baltimore are confronted with dozens of charges for animal abuse after a police raid in their home discovered 74 dead cats and nearly 150 more living in unfortunate circumstances at their emergency animal rescue center.

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Garriott J. Cox, 53, and Pamela Arrington, 51, were charged with 63 counts of aggravated animal abuse, animal abuse and non-provision of food, drink and care on November 4.

The couple, who manage Colony Cats or Bird River from their home, have been under investigation since September after Baltimore County Animal Services (BCAS) received numerous complaints from the Maryland SPCA about their pitfall, neuter, vaccination and release.

Two subsequent searches of their property on Bird Lane Road 1032 would restore no fewer than 221 animals – 74 dead and 147 alive – all in & # 39; poor conditions & # 39; were housed.

Garriott J. Cox, 53, and Pamela Arrington, 51, were charged with 63 counts of aggravated animal abuse, animal abuse and non-provision of food, drink and care on November 4, shortly after 221 animals - both dead and alive - were removed from their home in Middle River

Pamela Arrington

Pamela Arrington

Garriott J. Cox, 53, and Pamela Arrington, 51 (above) were charged with 63 counts of aggravated animal abuse, animal abuse and non-provision of food, drink and care on November 4, shortly after 221 animals – both dead and alive – became removed from their home in Middle River

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According to a police report from DailyMail.com, Arrington would regularly bring cats to the SPCA of Maryland to be checked and diagnosed by veterinarians, who later raised concerns with BCAS.

In their letter, the vets described the different cats and kittens in terrible conditions with a & # 39; dirty indescribable odor, adding that Arrington sometimes smelled of the odor itself.

"She also brought us a few kittens who were in a bad way and refused our medical services and offered to have these sick kittens included in our daycare program, which says they could take better care of them," the vets said, reported by CBS.

In the meantime, BCAS has received separate reports from concerned residents living near Arrington and Cox, who said that a foul odor coming from their home could be smelled from the street & # 39;

The residents expressed concern about the number of cats and other animals they had in their possession, believing that the problem could be a "potential hamster situation."

After the first complaint, an investigation was initiated and on September 24, officers went to the couple's rescue center to investigate the property.

The officers, greeted by Arrington, entered the house through a side door at the garage of the house where they were immediately confronted with very high levels of cat urine odor and ammonia, according to the police report.

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"My eyes and nose started burning and running right away and I had trouble talking while I was in the garage," said the report from Animal Services Officer Franczkowski.

Franczkowski noted that the garage had only a small opening for ventilation with air cleaners, and the garage floor seemed to be covered with dog crates, a cat flat, traps and transport cages, each of which housed up to five cats.

The couple, who run Colony Cats or Bird River from the premises, have been investigated since September after Baltimore County Animal Services (BCAS) received numerous complaints from the Maryland SPCA about their pitfall, neuter, vaccine and release company.

The couple, who run Colony Cats or Bird River from the premises, have been investigated since September after Baltimore County Animal Services (BCAS) received numerous complaints from the Maryland SPCA about their pitfall, neuter, vaccine and release company.

The couple, who run Colony Cats or Bird River from the premises, have been investigated since September after Baltimore County Animal Services (BCAS) received numerous complaints from the Maryland SPCA about their pitfall, neuter, vaccine and release company.

Many of the cages were not cleaned with more droppings than litter in their bins, officers said. Some cats either had no water in their bowls, or no bowls at all.

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One of the cats, housed in a small cage, was also leukemia positive but was not removed from the other animals.

Although Colony Cats from Bird River and Beyond was established as a non-profit organization, neither Cox nor Arrington had applied for a permit for a holding facility through Baltimore County, the police report said.

For the number of cats the couple had at home, a permit for a holding facility is required by law.

Although Colony Cats from Bird River and Beyond was established as a non-profit organization, neither Cox nor Arrington had applied for a permit for a holding facility through Baltimore County, the police report said.

Although Colony Cats from Bird River and Beyond was established as a non-profit organization, neither Cox nor Arrington had applied for a permit for a holding facility through Baltimore County, the police report said.

Although Colony Cats from Bird River and Beyond was established as a non-profit organization, neither Cox nor Arrington had applied for a permit for a holding facility through Baltimore County, the police report said.

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Based on their findings, Animal Service Officers went to the house on Bird Road with and carried out a search and seizure order for the garage on October 9.

The officers described how they saw large piles of trash and debris when they arrived, but what they found in the garage was much worse.

As they passed the cage – stacked two storeys high on top of each other – the cats rushed inside and climbed the walls of the containers that officials say is a clear sign of hunger.

Many of their trays had more faeces in them than they did litter, researchers said.

They eventually discovered that 76 live cats were housed in the small cages, about half of whom suffered from some kind of illness, including conjunctivitis, infections, leukemia, ulcers, and upper respiratory tract infections.

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Their search in the garage also discovered 15 dead cats, some of which were stored in white styrofoam boxes placed on cages with live cats in them.

& # 39; While executing the search warrant in the outbuildings, detectives saw cats in the window of the house. And every time she looked up, it was a different cat they would see, & said Baltimore County police spokeswoman, Jennifer Peach.

"They did more research to find a more likely cause to get a search warrant for the house."

Days later, on October 17, the police returned again after receiving a second search warrant for the house on the property.

A letter to the authorities described the different cats and kittens as in terrible conditions with a & # 39; dirty indescribable odor & nbsp; adding that Arrington sometimes smelled of the odor itself

A letter to the authorities described the different cats and kittens as in terrible conditions with a & # 39; dirty indescribable odor & nbsp; adding that Arrington sometimes smelled of the odor itself

A letter to the authorities described the different cats and kittens as in terrible conditions with a & # 39; dirty indescribable odor & nbsp; adding that Arrington sometimes smelled of the odor itself

After they & # 39; several hours & # 39; had spent no less than 74 living cats and 59 dead in the house, along with a living bird and two living dogs kept in cages in the master bedroom.

Three of the dead cats were found in the kitchen freezer. The vast majority of other deceased cats were found in a shed, stored in cool boxes that had a & # 39; foul odor & # 39; had and were & # 39; covered with flies, mosquitoes and maggots & # 39 ;.

The inside of the house was covered with animal excrement and urine, officers said, with one detective nothing was the kitchen & # 39; at its best & # 39; horrible & # 39 ;, running around with debris, animal droppings and loose cats, along with dirty dishes in the sink and cobwebs on the wall.

On various occasions in the report, detectives and other respondents describe feeling sick or having trouble talking due to the smell of chemical odors throughout the building.

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However, the recovered bird was present in a clean cage with fresh paper at the bottom of the cage with food and water.

"This is important because it demonstrates that the owners of the animals, Cox and Arrington, have the ability and the knowledge to care for animals properly," the police report said.

Cox and Arrington were both imprisoned last Monday. Cox was released on Tuesday and Arrington on Thursday after the pair had both posted their $ 50,000 bail.

On Monday, Baltimore County Police Cpl. Shawn Vinson said the two are planning a lawsuit against the police in an attempt to get some live animals back.

"We may be in a situation where we have to go back inside and save more animals if they are allowed to come back," he said.

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