‘Fatal Attraction’ killer allowed to test DNA test evidence

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Carolyn Warmus, now 56, was paroled from a New York prison two years ago after serving 27 years for the murder of her lover's wife in 1989

Carolyn Warmus, now 56, was paroled from a New York prison two years ago after serving 27 years for the murder of her lover’s wife in 1989

Prosecutors in New York allow DNA testing of evidence from the 1992 trial of so-called ‘Fatal Attraction’ killer Carolyn Warmus who served 27 years for the murder of her lover’s wife.

Westchester County district attorney Mimi Rocah on Monday agreed to test three pieces of evidence used to convict Warmus, now 56, for the murder of Betty Jeanne Solomon.

She was released on parole two years ago after serving more than 20 years in prison.

Warmus was having an affair with Betty’s husband, Paul Solomon, when she shot her nine times at the victim’s home in Greenburgh, New York on January 15, 1989.

After shooting her, prosecutors said Warmus went to meet Paul at a hotel bar for cocktails before having sex with him in his car.

Paul found her body, which had also been hit with a gun, when he came home from his rendezvous with Warmus.

Warmus’ first trial for the murder of Betty ended on a jury in 1991, but a year later she was found guilty of second-degree murder.

Warmus was convicted of shooting Betty Jeanne Solomon nine times in her home in Greenburgh, New York in 1989. Warmus had had an affair with Betty's husband Paul Solomon.  Betty and Paul Solomon are pictured above

Warmus was convicted of shooting Betty Jeanne Solomon nine times in her home in Greenburgh, New York in 1989. Warmus had had an affair with Betty’s husband Paul Solomon. Betty and Paul Solomon are pictured above

Warmus' first trial for the murder of Betty ended on a jury in 1991, but a year later she was found guilty of second-degree murder.  Warmus is pictured above in 1991 at her trial

Warmus’ first trial for the murder of Betty ended on a jury in 1991, but a year later she was found guilty of second-degree murder. Warmus is pictured above in 1991 at her trial

PROOF CAROLYN WANTS TO TEST:

A glove found in the Solomons home at the time of the murder

Semen recovered from the victim’s body

Found blood in one carrier bag belonging to the victim’s husband

Warmus, the daughter of a millionaire insurance director, has always maintained her innocence, claiming that she was set up by Paul.

In an interview behind bars, Warmus said, “I am in prison for 25 to life for dating a married man.”

She has tried to have the three pieces of evidence tested to determine if they can indemnify her by referring to another suspect.

The new development in the case was first reported in the Journal News.

The evidence includes a glove found at the Solomons home that was important piece of evidence in the second trial.

Prosecutors said Warmus had left the glove there at the time of the murder.

Her lawyers have argued that testing the glove could prove that someone other than Warmus was present when Betty was murdered.

The other evidence is the victim’s semen and blood found in Paul’s carrying case.

Betty’s murder attracted widespread media attention and was named the Fatal Attraction murder after the 1987 film starring Glenn Close and Michael Douglas.

After shooting her nine times, prosecutors said Warmus went to meet Paul Solomon (pictured above in 1992) at a hotel bar for cocktails before having sex with him in his car. Paul found his wife’s gun-struck body as he returned home from his tryst with Warmus

Warmus was having an affair with Betty's husband, Paul Solomon, when she shot her nine times at the victim's family home (pictured above) in Greenburgh, New York on January 15, 1989

Warmus was having an affair with Betty’s husband, Paul Solomon, when she shot her nine times at the victim’s family home (pictured above) in Greenburgh, New York on January 15, 1989

During her trial, prosecutors explained how Warmus began having an affair with Paul when she was 23 years old.

They started the affair when both worked as teachers at a school in Scarsdale and it lasted for 18 months.

Paul is said to have promised Warmus that he would leave his wife if the teenage daughter he shared with Betty finished high school.

Prosecutors alleged that Warmus killed Betty to get her out of the way.

Police initially suspected that Paul had murdered his wife, but they never charged him.

Warmus was not considered a suspect until a year after the murder when she followed Paul and his new girlfriend to Puerto Rico.

He told police she was stalking him and followed him to the island uninvited.

However, Warmus insisted that he invited her there.

She was arrested 13 months after the murder when police discovered she had bought a gun from a private investigator, Vincent Parco, days before the shooting.

Warmus claims he and Parco teamed up to put her behind bars.

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