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Employees of Amazon, Whole Foods, Instacart, Target and Walmart join forces to organize a massive disease

Employees of some of America’s largest companies coordinate a “massive illness” to protest unsafe working conditions amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Hundreds of employees from Amazon, Whole Foods, Instacart, Target, and Walmart have reported sick or plan to quit their jobs on Friday afternoon in an effort to pay for danger wages, sick leave, protective equipment, and additional cleaning supplies.

The workers have become essential workers during the COVID-19 outbreak, but say the bosses are not doing enough to reduce their chances of contracting the virus.

While small groups from each of the companies have been requesting safer working conditions since mid-March, Friday’s illness is the first time they have joined forces to create a large-scale ‘movement’.

The disease falls on International Labor Day and organizers are also calling on customers to boycott purchases of listed companies’ products all day.

“As workers, we have freedom of choice, we can change things, and we don’t have to be passive spectators in our political and social lives,” said a Target employee in Virginia NBC News, saying that he and his colleagues planned to participate in the disease.

Hundreds of employees from Amazon, Whole Foods, Instacart, Target, and Walmart have reported sick or plan to quit their jobs on Friday afternoon in an effort to pay for danger wages, sick leave, protective equipment, and additional cleaning supplies. A demonstrator outside of Whole Foods was seen earlier this month

Hundreds of employees from Amazon, Whole Foods, Instacart, Target, and Walmart have reported sick or plan to quit their jobs on Friday afternoon in an effort to pay for danger wages, sick leave, protective equipment, and additional cleaning supplies. A demonstrator outside of Whole Foods was seen earlier this month

Christian Smalls, a former Amazon worker who was fired from the company in March after staging a strike due to safety conditions, is helping to organize Friday’s illness.

He told The Washington Post that employees of about 25 Amazon warehouses are “expected to walk out around noon and petition for the facilities.”

“The virus kills some of our employees – this is a matter of life or death,” said Smalls.

Employees in more than a dozen factories of Amazon have tested positive for COVID-19, and at least one employee has died.

However, Amazon – which also owns Whole Foods – has been pushed back, claiming that workgroups “spread misinformation and make false claims” about the company.

“The statements made are not supported by facts or representative of the majority of the 500,000 Amazon workers in the United States who turn up to support their communities,” spokeswoman Rachael Lighty told The Post.

Posters supporting the boycott of the customer have been widely shared on Twitter

Posters supporting the boycott of the customer have been widely shared on Twitter

Posters supporting the boycott of the customer have been widely shared on Twitter

Hundreds of posts shared on social media on Friday came from consumers saying they would not buy products from companies until workers' demands were met

Hundreds of posts shared on social media on Friday came from consumers saying they would not buy products from companies until workers' demands were met

Hundreds of posts shared on social media on Friday came from consumers saying they would not buy products from companies until workers’ demands were met

Meanwhile, Target says they “ distribute protective gear, thoroughly clean checkout strips, limit customer traffic, and add plexiglass walls ” to protect their employees.

They say that only a small number of their 340,000 frontline workers are likely to join the disease.

However, the public seems to side with workers.

Hundreds of posts shared on social media on Friday came from consumers saying they wouldn’t buy products from companies until workers’ demands were met.

Charles Booker, a candidate for Congress, wrote on Twitter: Our lives are not commodities. Our labor does not define our humanity. That’s why we organize. That is why we strike where necessary. On # MayDay2020 and every day I show solidarity with workers and organized labor. Proud to be on the phone with you. ‘

Another Twitter user said, “It’s my birthday. Boycott @amazon ‘.

A government policy expert predicts that a corporate public relations disaster may not meet some of the requirements - since public sentiment is on the workers' side

A government policy expert predicts that a corporate public relations disaster may not meet some of the requirements - since public sentiment is on the workers' side

A government policy expert predicts that a corporate public relations disaster may not meet some of the requirements – since public sentiment is on the workers’ side

A government policy expert predicts that a corporate public relations disaster may not meet some of the requirements – especially given that Amazon and Instacart have seen demand rise amid nationwide home orders.

“If their sales go up, but they don’t pass fair wages on to workers, it could be a huge PR disaster for some of these companies,” a Molly Kinder, a fellow at the Brookings Institution, told The Post.

More than a million Americans have tested positive for COVID-19 and more than 63,000 have died.

Too bad about the Instacart bait and switch: people are luring employees with promises of huge tips – and adjusting them to $ 0 after delivery

Instacart employees say that customers who are afraid to go to the supermarket during the coronavirus lock lure them with big tips to cancel the tip completely after delivering the groceries to their home.

The big tips are offered to increase the likelihood of an order being delivered within a reasonable time frame – a challenge nowadays given the huge demand for grocery delivery.

The practice is known as ‘tip baiting’, but customers have up to three days after delivery to change or completely remove the tip amount.

An Instacart employee said she was left ‘demoralized’ after promised a $ 55 tip, only for the customer to convert it to $ 0 after she risked herself getting their groceries and delivering.

“I was flabbergasted. I couldn’t believe it, ”employee Annalilisa Arambula told CNN Business.

An Instacart spokesperson told CNN that it is rare for customers to adjust their tips down after delivery.

The spokesperson said the company recently removed the ‘none’ option for a tip, so if a customer chooses not to leave a tip, they should type ‘0’.

An Instacart shopper can be seen above in Washington, DC and delivers a grocery delivery on Monday. Some Instacart buyers say they have fallen victim to tip-baiting by customers

An Instacart shopper can be seen above in Washington, DC and delivers a grocery delivery on Monday. Some Instacart buyers say they have fallen victim to tip-baiting by customers

An Instacart shopper can be seen above in Washington, DC and delivers a grocery delivery on Monday. Some Instacart buyers say they have fallen victim to tip-baiting by customers

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