Elly Miles returns to her post promoting a meat diet and calling vegetables ‘toxic’

Bachelorette star Elly Miles has bounced back on her controversial Instagram post endorsing an all-meat diet that labels fruits and vegetables as “toxic.”

The 26-year-old influencer raised eyebrows over the weekend when she reposted an image depicting the “toxic” foods considered banned by followers of the “carnivore diet” — a trendy eating regimen made up entirely of meat and animal products.

An attempt to clear the air on Tuesday, Elly told WHO magazine that she actually likes veggies and that her post — which categorizes peppers, tomatoes, and leafy greens as “most toxic” — has been “misunderstood” by fans.

‘I don’t claim to be an expert’: Elly Miles, 26, (pictured) of The Bachelorette has backtracked on her controversial post promoting a meat diet, insisting she ‘loves vegetables’ – despite being ‘toxic’ ‘ called

‘I like vegetables, I have nothing against vegetables. It’s absolutely devastating,” she told the publication after receiving a wave of online reaction from fans about the post.

Elly explained that she’s currently trying a two-month carnivore challenge, uploading the post to explain “the kind of plants she can implement into her diet.”

“I don’t claim to be an expert by any means and it could come across that way,” insisted the licensed nurse.

Causing controversy: In a now-deleted Instagram Story post, the reality star reposted an image detailing the 'toxic' foods considered banned by supporters of the 'carnivore diet' — a trendy eating regimen made up entirely of meat and animal products.

Causing controversy: In a now-deleted Instagram Story post, the reality star reposted an image detailing the ‘toxic’ foods considered banned by supporters of the ‘carnivore diet’ — a trendy eating regimen made up entirely of meat and animal products.

'I like veggies, I have nothing against veggies': Elly tried to clear the air on Tuesday, telling Who magazine that she really likes veggies and that her post — which categorizes peppers, tomatoes and leafy greens as

‘I like veggies, I have nothing against veggies’: Elly tried to clear the air on Tuesday, telling Who magazine that she really likes veggies and that her post — which categorizes peppers, tomatoes and leafy greens as “most toxic” — was ‘misinterpreted’ by fans

Elly explained that she’s not too strict on the diet and will return to her usual omnivorous diet once her two-month “challenge” is complete.

“I really love food and I just wanted to document this new experiment with my diet as I take on the challenge,” she said, before advising fans not to follow any diets they hear about online without consulting a medical professional.

However, Elly gave no explanation as to why she considers certain fruits and vegetables to be “toxic” – despite this being the core of fan criticism.

Breaking her silence: Elly explained that she's currently trying a two-month carnivore challenge, uploading the post to explain 'the kind of plants she can implement into her diet'

Breaking her silence: Elly explained that she’s currently trying a two-month carnivore challenge, uploading the post to explain ‘the kind of plants she can implement into her diet’

Elly’s now-deleted Instagram Story post featured a colorful table categorizing everyday foods as either “most toxic” or “least toxic,” but offered no explanation as to why they were posted there.

The ‘most toxic’ foods were peppers, tomatoes, eggplant, leafy greens, onions, broccoli, nuts and grains.

‘Least toxic’ foods were avocados, honey, berries, cucumbers and dates.

Short-term diet: Elly explained that she doesn't follow the diet too strictly and will return to her usual omnivorous diet once her two-month 'challenge' is complete

Short-term diet: Elly explained that she doesn’t follow the diet too strictly and will return to her usual omnivorous diet once her two-month ‘challenge’ is complete

Elly wrote next to the image: ‘I’m getting tons of Q’s in my DMs about Carnivore! I’ll be editing my 2-week IGTV tonight and trying to get it on!’

She continued: ‘PS everyone always asks if I can eat vegetables at all – and while I keep it to a minimum, if I did, below is an example of what that might look like [love-heart emoji]’.

Elly’s post sparked confusion and frustration among her followers, with one Instagram user commenting, “What was up with that poisonous vegetable thing?”

No explanation: However, Elly has not provided an explanation as to why she considers certain fruits and vegetables to be 'toxic' - despite this being the core of fan criticism

No explanation: However, Elly has not provided an explanation as to why she considers certain fruits and vegetables to be ‘toxic’ – despite this being the core of fan criticism

Confused: Elly's post sparked confusion and frustration among her followers, with one Instagram user commenting,

Confused: Elly’s post sparked confusion and frustration among her followers, with one Instagram user commenting, “What was up with that poisonous vegetable thing?”

‘So do you eat raw meat for all your meals, or do you cook it in oil from ‘poisonous’ plants and flavor it with ‘poisonous’ plants? Get a job,’ another complained.

A more extreme version of the keto and paleo diets, the carnivore diet has drawn criticism from health experts who argue that restricting whole food groups can be unhealthy in the long run.

Proponents of the diet claim it can help with weight loss, mood problems, and blood sugar regulation, but there is no scientific evidence to support these beliefs.

‘[The carnivore diet] is absolutely ridiculous,” dietitian Nichola Ludlam-Raine said earlier Insider.

“It’s hugely devoid of nutrients, carbohydrates and fiber, most likely leaving you with a lack of energy (with a headache) and also constipation.”

Restrictive: A more extreme version of the keto and paleo diet, the carnivore diet has drawn criticism from health experts who argue that restricting whole food groups can be unhealthy in the long run

Restrictive: A more extreme version of the keto and paleo diet, the carnivore diet has drawn criticism from health experts who argue that restricting whole food groups can be unhealthy in the long run

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