Drug dealer who weighs 900 pounds pleads guilty to cocaine costs lying in an ambulance

Drug dealer of 900lbs pleads guilty of cocaine costs while he is in an AMBULANCE in a special courtroom set up in a loading bay

  • Kenneth Hicks, 48, pleaded guilty to cocaine costs while lying in ambulance
  • Hicks, who weighs 900 pounds, made a guilty plea at the hearing at a loading dock
  • US magistrate judge David Novak said the court was dealing with & # 39; some extraordinary proceedings & # 39; to address Hicks health issues and & # 39; protect his dignity & # 39;
  • Hicks and 17 others were charged with a plot to sell cocaine in four years
  • He is faced with a mandatory minimum five-year prison sentence, officials said

A Virginia man weighing more than 900 pounds pleaded guilty to cocaine charges on Tuesday while lying in an ambulance.

Kenneth Hicks made his guilty plea in a federal cocaine compassion case during a hearing held in a dock for loading a courthouse when the defendant lay on a stretcher in the rescue unit.

US magistrate Judge David Novak said the court was dealing with & # 39; some extraordinary proceedings & # 39; to address Hicks' health issues and protect & # 39; his dignity & # 39 ;.

Hicks, 48, remained in the ambulance and was not visible to several of his relatives and reporters attending the hearing.

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Kenneth Hicks, 48, from Virginia, who weighs more than 900 pounds, pleaded guilty to cocaine charges on Tuesday while lying in an ambulance (pictured)

Kenneth Hicks, 48, from Virginia, who weighs more than 900 pounds, pleaded guilty to cocaine charges on Tuesday while lying in an ambulance (pictured)

Hicks entered his guilty plea in a federal cocaine clause case during a hearing held in a courthouse loader dock as the defendant lay on a stretcher within the rescue unit

Hicks entered his guilty plea in a federal cocaine clause case during a hearing held in a courthouse loader dock as the defendant lay on a stretcher within the rescue unit

Hicks entered his guilty plea in a federal cocaine clause case during a hearing held in a courthouse loader dock as the defendant lay on a stretcher within the rescue unit

US magistrate Judge David Novak said the court was dealing with & # 39; some extraordinary proceedings & # 39; to address Hicks' health issues and protect & # 39; his dignity & # 39 ;. Hicks remained in the ambulance and was not visible to some of his relatives and reporters attending the hearing

US magistrate Judge David Novak said the court was dealing with & # 39; some extraordinary proceedings & # 39; to address Hicks' health issues and protect & # 39; his dignity & # 39 ;. Hicks remained in the ambulance and was not visible to some of his relatives and reporters attending the hearing

US magistrate Judge David Novak said the court was dealing with & # 39; some extraordinary proceedings & # 39; to address Hicks' health issues and protect & # 39; his dignity & # 39 ;. Hicks remained in the ambulance and was not visible to some of his relatives and reporters attending the hearing

He was visible to Novak and a public prosecutor sitting at a table at the back of the ambulance.

The hearing was postponed last week when Hicks was brought to a hospital for an unspecified health problem after he was taken from his home.

Hicks, who lives in Emporia, was charged with 17 other people for a plot to sell cocaine between 2013 and 2017.

Three out of seven charged people have already pleaded guilty.

Various judicial documents relating to the conspiracy have been sealed or remedied.

He had his first appearance in court in March via video teleconference and was allowed to stand surety in his house.

Due to various health issues, including his morbid obesity, Hicks – through his lawyer – asked for help to be taken to the courthouse for his hearing.

Court witnesses in the case described Hicks as being limited to his bed and unable to dress or be dressed by others.

Novak approved a plan submitted by Hicks' defense lawyer and prosecutors to allow the US Marshals Service, the FBI, and first responders to remove him from his home (pictured)

Novak approved a plan submitted by Hicks' defense lawyer and prosecutors to allow the US Marshals Service, the FBI, and first responders to remove him from his home (pictured)

Novak approved a plan submitted by Hicks' defense lawyer and prosecutors to allow the US Marshals Service, the FBI, and first responders to remove him from his home (pictured)

Officials placed him on a stretcher and pushed him through a doorway or cut a large hole in a wall of his house to use a device that could lift his weight. Authorities did not reveal how he was moved

Officials placed him on a stretcher and pushed him through a doorway or cut a large hole in a wall of his house to use a device that could lift his weight. Authorities did not reveal how he was moved

Officials placed him on a stretcher and pushed him through a doorway or cut a large hole in a wall of his house to use a device that could lift his weight. Authorities did not reveal how he was moved

Novak approved a plan submitted by Hicks' defense lawyer and prosecutors to have the US Marshals Service, the FBI and the first responders remove him from his home.

Officials placed him on a stretcher and pushed him through a doorway or cut a large hole in a wall of his house to use a device that could lift his weight.

Authorities did not reveal how he was moved.

His hearing was originally scheduled for May 13. That hearing was postponed when he was taken to a hospital in Richmond.

During Tuesday's hearing, Hicks told Novak that he had been transferred to another hospital, that he had received insulin and was being treated for various health issues.

Hicks is faced with a mandatory minimum penalty of five years in prison and a maximum penalty of 40 years.

Novak has scheduled its sentencing hearing for September 4.

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