Demonstrators come face-to-face in Winston-Salem over the Confederate statue

• Bury it six feet in the ground & # 39 ;: angry scenes as protesters demand that the statue of a southern soldier is knocked down in the town of Massechusets – but rival group says it honors & # 39; ancestors & # 39;

  • About 150 protesters in favor of removing the statue turned out in the city
  • At only 25 feet from them gathered nearly 50 pro-statue demonstrators
  • Sunday's protest went without violence despite the fact that both parties had trade insults

George Martin for mailonline

Hundreds of protesting demonstrators went to the streets of a Massechusets town on Sunday to protest and stand against the removal of a Confederate statue.

Almost 150 people campaigning against a statue in honor of Southern soldiers who died during the American Civil War arranged the march in the center of Winston-Salem on Sunday morning.

But their demonstrations took an ugly turn when about fifty counter-preachers gathered in the neighborhood on the square where the controversial statue stands.

A supporter of the Confederate statue in Winston-Salem, N.C. reviled on Sunday anti-statue protesters

A supporter of the Confederate statue in Winston-Salem, N.C. reviled on Sunday anti-statue protesters

Demonstrators gathered to sing Dixie at the foot of the statue in a show of support for the ancient monument

Demonstrators gathered to sing Dixie at the foot of the statue in a show of support for the ancient monument

Demonstrators gathered to sing Dixie at the foot of the statue in a show of support for the ancient monument

Anti-statue protesters sang: "No hatred, no KKK, no fascist US," & # 39; Your southern soldiers were hostile fighters and & # 39; ignore the will of the people in the name of Happy Hill. & # 39;

They also held signs with the text & # 39; Get rid of white supremacy & # 39 ;, & # 39; Get the hatred out of Winston-Salem & # 39; and & # 39; Always antifascist & # 39 ;.

Despite the fact that they were only 25 feet apart, the protests did not decline in violence.

Only policemen, journalists and photographers separated the booming crowds – the police only had to tell the two groups once to go back.

Statue-supporters usually did not respond to the hymns that came from the other side, although there were crying squad cars screaming across the open square until late in the afternoon.

Terrance Hawkins, with Drum Majors Alliance, a demonstrator for a move from a Southern statue to Salem Cemetery, speaks at the Sunday meeting

Terrance Hawkins, with Drum Majors Alliance, a demonstrator for a move from a Southern statue to Salem Cemetery, speaks at the Sunday meeting

Terrance Hawkins, with Drum Majors Alliance, a demonstrator for a move from a Southern statue to Salem Cemetery, speaks at the Sunday meeting

Anti-statue protesters waved with & # 39; Black Lives Matter & # 39; banners and & # 39; Hate Outta Winston & # 39; signs during their march

Anti-statue protesters waved with & # 39; Black Lives Matter & # 39; banners and & # 39; Hate Outta Winston & # 39; signs during their march

Anti-statue protesters waved with & # 39; Black Lives Matter & # 39; banners and & # 39; Hate Outta Winston & # 39; signs during their march

Anti-statue protesters waved with & # 39; Black Lives Matter & # 39; banners and & # 39; Hate Outta Winston & # 39; signs during their march

Anti-statue protesters waved with & # 39; Black Lives Matter & # 39; banners and & # 39; Hate Outta Winston & # 39; signs during their march

Several speakers who want the statue to be moved told the crowd that the statue stood before the Confederation that oppressed slaves and for the southerners who freed black people afterwards. Some called for the destruction of the image.

Rev. Paul Robeson Ford, the senior pastor in the First Baptist Church on Highland Avenue, said the southern soldiers fought for the wrong thing.

& # 39; The American civil war was the result of slavery, & # 39; Ford said. & # 39; Bury each monument at least 6 feet in the ground. Racism is bad. Kill it. It starts with that image. & # 39;

But Richard Webster of Tobaccoville said he wanted to contribute to the preservation of part of the local history.

& # 39; It is part of our history and our heritage, & # 39; Webster said. & # 39; It is like a tombstone. It honors our ancestors. & # 39;

Reverend Paul Robeson Ford of the First Baptist Church, speaks for the removal of the Southern statue

Reverend Paul Robeson Ford of the First Baptist Church, speaks for the removal of the Southern statue

Lance Spivey, chairman of heirs of the confederation, stands among co-protesters to support the holding of the southern statue

Lance Spivey, chairman of heirs of the confederation, stands among co-protesters to support the holding of the southern statue

Reverend Paul Robeson Ford of the First Baptist Church (left) and Lance Spivey, chairman of heirs of the Confederation (right), both showed their support for the opposite campaigns

Mikhaela Payden-Travers, a demonstrator in support of moving a Southern statue to Salem Cemetery, shows a sign during the rally

Mikhaela Payden-Travers, a demonstrator in support of moving a Southern statue to Salem Cemetery, shows a sign during the rally

Mikhaela Payden-Travers, a demonstrator in support of moving a Southern statue to Salem Cemetery, shows a sign during the rally

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