Coronial inquest investigating the circumstances that led to the death of Melbourne toddler

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Toddler found dead in bed and lying on pillow covered in vomit had seen ‘non-accidental injuries’ in high speed car crash victims, court hears

  • Coronial inquest investigating the circumstances that led to the death of 22 months old
  • The little boy died after being found unconscious in a crib in the Melbourne house
  • The court heard that the boy had drugs in his system and fractures to his wrist and ribs

A toddler who died after being found unconscious in his crib had traces of drugs in his system and internal injuries similar to those caused by “ high speed ” road accidents, a coronary investigation has heard.

The 22-month-old boy was rushed to the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne on February 19, 2015 after his mother’s partner discovered him on a pillow with vomit. He was pronounced dead the next day.

A port-mortem examination revealed that the boy had gone into cardiac arrest, but the cause of his death could not be determined.

The circumstances that led to his death are now the subject of a coronial investigation by Victoria’s Deputy State Investigator Caitlin English, along with previous emergency visits to hospitals and measures to protect children. NCA Newswire reported.

A coronial inquest in Victoria examines the circumstances that led to the death of a 22-month-old baby in Melbourne in 2015 (stock image)

A coronial inquest in Victoria examines the circumstances that led to the death of a 22-month-old baby in Melbourne in 2015 (stock image)

Victoria’s Coroners Court heard on Tuesday how the boy suffered internal bleeding three days before death, sustained an injury to his testicles, had week-old fractures on his wrist and ribs, and traces of methylamphetamine and amphetamine.

Forensic pathologist Dr. Yeliena Baber, who performed the boy’s autopsy, told the court that the bleeding on the boy’s peritoneum was often caused by high-speed traffic accidents using seat belts.

Dr. Baber also told the court that there were “quite a lot” of dark purple bruises on the boy’s testicles and that the injury was “relatively recent.”

She said the boy’s toddler brother was unlikely to cause the injury “ in the normal sibling roughness, ” although it was “ possible. ”

“It’s not just doing normal routine things, no – you’d see little boys going to the emergency room all the time,” Dr. Baber told the court.

Forensic toxicologist Dimitri Gerostamoulos told the court that the presence of drugs in the boy’s hair, blood and urine “means they must have been swallowed.”

The 22-month-old boy was rushed to the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne (pictured) after unresponsive in his bed

The 22-month-old boy was rushed to the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne (pictured) after unresponsive in his bed

The 22-month-old boy was rushed to the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne (pictured) after unresponsive in his bed

The court heard how the boy was taken to hospital in a separate incident three months before his death, where he had reported himself as a ‘floppy’.

The boy’s mother’s partner had found the toddler with baby wipes in his mouth before taking him to the hospital.

Dr. Timothy Cain told the court that the boy’s week-old fractures to his wrist and broken ribs were “not accidental injuries.”

He said broken ribs require “significant” strength and were uncommon in young children.

The coronial judicial investigation continues on Wednesday.

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