Congressman Hank Johnson says Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp ‘puts his knee on voters’ necks’

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Democratic Representative Hank Johnson criticized Governor Brian Kemp for passing Georgia’s new electoral law, compared to George Floyd’s assassination in May.

Johnson was on CNN in the wake of the passing of state law, which imposes new restrictions on voting in the state.

“Just as that officer had his knee in George Floyd’s neck, what the governor did secretly inside closed doors was put his knee in the neck of the Georgian voters,” Johnson said during his segment.

Floyd was killed after police officer Derek Chauvin knelt on Floyd’s neck for more than eight minutes, limiting Floyd’s ability to breathe.

Chavin’s trial in Floyd’s death began earlier this month.

Democratic Representative Hank Johnson criticized the passing of Georgia's new electoral law

Democratic Representative Hank Johnson criticized the passing of Georgia’s new electoral law

Johnson compared the passage of the new legislation to the murder of George Floyd in May

Johnson compared the passage of the new legislation to the murder of George Floyd in May

Johnson compared the passage of the new legislation to the murder of George Floyd in May

“He was in his office, behind closed doors, with a collection of good old boys,” Johnson continued, referring to Kemp.

According to CNN, the new bill – signed Thursday night after passing both legislative chambers in the state – will impose some new voting restrictions.

Among them, there will be new voter requirements to identify absentee ballots, government officials will have the ability to take over local election committees, and the use of ballots will be limited.

The law replaces the elected secretary of state as chairman of the state election council with a new appointee from the legislature after Republican secretary of state Brad Raffensperger rejected Trump’s attempts to reverse Georgia’s election results. It also allows the board to remove and replace provincial election officials who are considered substandard.

In addition, it will be a crime for people to approach voters in long electoral lines to provide food or water.

“It’s like the Christmas tree of voter oppression goodies,” Senator Jen Jordan said ahead of the vote.

Three voting rights groups have already banded together to file a lawsuit to challenge the law.

“These provisions lack any justification for their incriminating and discriminatory effects on voting,” the lawsuit said.

Instead, they represent a mishmash of unnecessary restrictions that target almost every aspect of the voting process, but serve no legitimate purpose or compelling state interest, other than to make voting in absence, early elections, and election day more difficult – especially for minority voters. ‘

However, Kemp has defended that the law provides certainty.

“After the election last November, I, like so many of you, knew that important reforms to our state elections were needed,” said Kemp, expressing Trump’s anger after he certified Biden’s victory in Georgia.

Georgia Governor Brian Kemp signed the legislation after it passed state chambers on Thursday

Georgia Governor Brian Kemp signed the legislation after it passed state chambers Thursday

Georgia Governor Brian Kemp signed the legislation after it passed state chambers on Thursday

Kemp refused to reverse the election results in his state in 2020, irritating Donald Trump

Kemp refused to reverse the election results in his state in 2020, irritating Donald Trump

Kemp refused to reverse the election results in his state in 2020, irritating Donald Trump

Johnson also commented on the arrest of Park Cannon, a state representative who was taken away by state forces after knocking on the door where Kemp announced the bill.

“Well, it’s a throwback to the past,” Johnson said. It’s actually almost like a knee in the neck of Georgia voters.

She just knocked on the door, and for that action her hands were handcuffed behind her back like a common criminal and literally dragged out of the Georgia capital.

State legislator Park Cannon chose to protest the new legislation on Thursday evening

State legislator Park Cannon chose to protest the new legislation on Thursday evening

State legislator Park Cannon chose to protest the new legislation on Thursday evening

Cannon's protest resulted in her arrest and she is facing two charges in the incident

Cannon's protest resulted in her arrest and she is facing two charges in the incident

Cannon’s protest resulted in her arrest and she is facing two charges in the incident

“You couldn’t even enter the Capitol. Now you can go in, but it’s a law not to knock on the door to get in, and it’s something that won’t hold up. ‘

NPR reports that Cannon is accused of interfering with law enforcement through threats or violence.

She is also accused of disrupting general or other meetings of members.

Her arrest warrant claims that she “ stomped ” on the foot of an officer three times during the arrest.

Kanon was released the same night and may have been bruised during arrest.

“This was a violation of law enforcement on all charges, and I hope that after examining the file, the prosecutor will dismiss the charges,” Cannon’s attorney Gerald Griggs said Friday.

Georgia was one of the most controversial places in the most recent presidential election.

Joe Biden became the first Democrat in nearly 30 years to run the presidential election in the state.

Two second elections that took place in the wake of Biden’s victory helped turn the Senate in favor of the Democrats.

Many of Donald Trump’s allegations of electoral fraud focused on Georgia, and Trump demanded that Kemp reverse the election results in the state, which Kemp refused.

Despite Trump’s fraud claims being unsubstantiated, Republicans have focused on changing electoral laws across the country.

By February, 43 states had introduced bills that would restrict voting laws across the country.

“The voters of Fulton County, the voters of Georgia, will not allow this just outrageous legislation to be the law of the country,” Johnson told CNN.