Climate change and human growth threaten almost 7,000 plant species in Africa

Climate change and the growth of the human population are putting 7,000 plant species in Africa at risk of extinction, a study shows

  • Research has shown that one third of the tropical plants in Africa are on their way to extinction
  • Researchers saw the human growth population and climate change as causes
  • Ethiopia is most affected by 50% of its species threatened
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A third of the tropical plants in Africa are on their way to extinction, a study found.

Researchers have found that out of more than 22,000 types of vascular plants, nearly 7,000 are now classified as & # 39; probable or possible & # 39; threatened.

The report points to the loss of biodiversity, rapid growth of the human population and land use changes and the effects of climate change as reasons why these plants disappear.

After an even deeper analysis, the team found that the most at-risk regions are Ethiopia, the center of Tanzania, the southern Democratic Republic of Congo and the forests of West Africa.

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A team of international researchers assessed the & # 39; Red List & # 39 ;, which & # 39; the most authoritative list of endangered species & # 39; was developed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

The researchers assessed a total of 22,036 vascular plant species in tropical Africa and discovered that 32 percent are on their way to disappear.

A third of the tropical plants in Africa are on their way to extinction, a study found. Researchers have found that out of more than 22,000 types of vascular plants, nearly 7,000 are now classified as & # 39; probable or possible & # 39; threatened. Pictured is an endangered tree species from Tanzania

A third of the tropical plants in Africa are on their way to extinction, a study found. Researchers have found that out of more than 22,000 types of vascular plants, nearly 7,000 are now classified as & # 39; probable or possible & # 39; threatened. Pictured is an endangered tree species from Tanzania

& # 39; Our study therefore provides further evidence that the flora of tropical Africa will be very fragile in the future & # 39 ;, the study published in Science is progressing.

& # 39; This situation will undoubtedly be exacerbated by the effects of climate change, one of the most important assumptions affecting the risk of extinction. & # 39;

Although several countries are losing fauna, the team found that Ethiopia has the largest number of disappearing species.

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The highlands of the country are in the top 10 of the most endangered with 50 percent of tropical plants considered to be & # 39; likely or potential & # 39; threatened.

After an even deeper analysis, the team found that the most risky regions were Ethiopia (photo), the center of Tanzania, the South Democratic Republic of Congo, and the forests of West Africa.

After an even deeper analysis, the team found that the most risky regions were Ethiopia (photo), the center of Tanzania, the South Democratic Republic of Congo, and the forests of West Africa.

After an even deeper analysis, the team found that the most risky regions were Ethiopia (photo), the center of Tanzania, the South Democratic Republic of Congo, and the forests of West Africa.

The researchers assessed a total of 22,036 vascular plant species in tropical Africa and discovered that 32 percent are on their way to disappear. Example of an endangered orchid species from Cameroon and Gabon

The researchers assessed a total of 22,036 vascular plant species in tropical Africa and discovered that 32 percent are on their way to disappear. Example of an endangered orchid species from Cameroon and Gabon

The researchers assessed a total of 22,036 vascular plant species in tropical Africa and discovered that 32 percent are on their way to disappear. Example of an endangered orchid species from Cameroon and Gabon

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The new study uses a new methodology based on key components of the assessment process of the IUCN Red List to distinguish the potential state of conservation of tropical flora on a continental scale.

The team used the newly built database called RAINBIO, which consists of more than 600,000 geo-reference data from more than 20,000 vascular plant species in tropical Africa.

& # 39; Tropical Africa is a very suitable model for conducting such research, as it faces significant and increasing threats from a wide range of activities including logging, logging and deforestation for agriculture and mining & # 39 ;, the study said.

After applying their PACA approach to the RAINBIO database, the researchers were able to categorize each species into five provisional conservation status levels: likely endangered, potentially endangered, likely rare, potentially rare and probably not endangered.

Study co-author Bonaventure Sonké noted that & # 39; These results were possible because the partners involved agreed to share their data, & # 39; added: & # 39; This is a strong signal to encourage researchers to share their data, to get results on a larger scale. & # 39;

WHAT SPEAKS FOR THE LOT OF PLANET PLANTS AND ANIMALS?

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Nature now has more problems than ever before in human history, with extinction looming over a million species of plants and animals, experts say.

That is the most important finding of the first comprehensive United Nations report on biodiversity – the diversity of plant and animal life in the world or in a particular habitat.

The report – published on May 6, 2019 – says that species are lost dozens or hundreds of times faster than in the past.

Many of the worst effects can be prevented by changing the way we grow food, produce energy, deal with climate change and throw away waste, the report said.

The 39-page summary of the report highlighted five ways in which people reduce biodiversity:

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– Forests, grasslands and other areas turn into farms, cities and other developments. The loss of habitat makes plants and animals homeless. Approximately three-quarters of the Earth's land, two-thirds of the oceans and 85% of the crucial wetlands have been severely altered or lost, making species more difficult to survive, the report said.

– Overfishing of the world's oceans. A third of the world's fish stocks are overfished.

– Allowing climate change by burning fossil fuels to make it too hot, wet or dry for some species to survive. Almost half of the land mammals in the world – excluding bats – and nearly a quarter of the birds have already hit their habitats hard by global warming.

– Polluting land and water. Every year, 300 to 400 million tonnes of heavy metals, solvents and toxic sludge are dumped into the world's waters.

– Allowing invasive species to displace native plants and animals. The number of invasive alien species per country has risen by 70 percent since 1970, with one species of bacteria threatening nearly 400 species of amphibians.

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