China wants to build a house on the other side of the moon using 3D printing technology & # 39;

China wants to be the first country to establish a base on the moon and says it will build it using 3D printing technology.

Officials from the Chinese space agency also said that the country will return to the moon by the end of the year with the Chang & # 39; e-5 mission.

Three successive missions will further explore the bare surface and the viability of building houses there.

China National Space Administration (CNSA) said that they also have plans to go to Mars in 2020, a timeline that would probably be the first to do so, including the US, Russia and the abundance of private firms that want to colonize space want to beat.

China has successfully achieved a world first with its journey to the other side of the moon when the country landed in the crater of Von Kármán on 4 January.

At a conference earlier today, the high-ranking CNSA employees claimed that the groundbreaking mission only cost the same as building a kilometer underground railway.

The lander and his associated robber – Yutu-2 – sent back footage of the equipment and the lunar landscape last week after the rover, called Jade Rabbit 2 in English, woke up from a forced napping & # 39 ;.

China's moon probe has transmitted the first panoramic image (left half, pictured) of its landing site since its historic arrival on the other side of the moon, and shows the crater landscape it explores. A camera deployed at Chang's e-4 took a photo that was released by the China National Space Administration (CNSA)

The panoramic image (right half, pictured) also reveals the Yutu-2 rover and its tracks. The tracks are never removed from the lunar surface because there is no wind or atmosphere to blow them away or erode

The panoramic image (right half, pictured) also reveals the Yutu-2 rover and its tracks. The tracks are never removed from the lunar surface because there is no wind or atmosphere to blow them away or erode

Dr. Wu Yanhua, deputy director of National Space and deputy commander of lunar exploration projects, said in a press conference: "E-5 will send mission sampling back to the surface of the moon around the end of this year.

He added: & # 39; The first Mars exploration mission of our country takes place before and after 2020. & # 39;

China is quickly starting to build a reputation as one of the forerunners in the renaissance of the space race with its ongoing investments in both Mars and Moon missions.

After Chang & # 39; e-5 moonstone returns from the surface of the next mission, Chang & e-6 will be the first mission to explore the south pole of the moon.

Chang & # 39; e-7 studies the land surface, the composition, the spatial representation in an extensive mission, it was claimed, while Chang & e-8 will focus on technical surface analysis.

China, America, Russia and Europe are reportedly discussing whether they should build a base station on the moon using 3D printing, for example to build homes and other infrastructure.

Mission number eight will probably lay the foundation for this while striving to verify the technology earmarked for the project and whether it is feasible as a scientific basis.

The 360 ​​° lens of Chang & # 39; e-4 last week captured the Yutu-2 or Jade Rabbit 2 rover for the gray lunar landscape.

It revealed the surface of the bacon and the bare expanse of the land within the mysterious Von Kármán crater near the south pole of the moon.

The picture shows the gray lunar landscape, the lander and the rover with the track marks that have been left behind. The image is a round, 360-degree photograph (photo), which scientists used to create another wide panoramic image

The picture shows the gray lunar landscape, the lander and the rover with the track marks that have been left behind. The image is a round, 360-degree photograph (photo), which scientists used to create another wide panoramic image

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF CHINESE SPACE RESEARCH?

Civil servants from the Chinese space agency have said that the country will return to the moon by the end of 2019 with the Chang & # 39; e-5 mission.

This collects stones from the nearest side of the moon and brings them back to earth for further study.

Chang & e-6 will be the first mission to explore the south pole of the moon.

Chang & # 39; e-7 studies the land surface, the composition, the spatial representation in an extensive mission, it was claimed, while Chang & e-8 will focus on technical surface analysis.

China is also reportedly building a moon base with 3D printing technology.

Mission number eight will probably lay the foundation for this while striving to verify the technology earmarked for the project and whether it is feasible as a scientific basis.

The Chinese space agency, the China National Space Administration (CNSA), also says they plan to travel to Mars by 2020.

Photos posted on Chinese social media also showed that Chang's E-4 and Yutu-2 photo's made each other.

This heavenly photo shoot gives a stunning look at the tandem of advanced machines that China is currently using to explore the previously unknown region.

Eternal immortal traces left from the first voyage of Yutu-2 away from Chang's e-4 on January 4 can also be seen writhing across the pristine surface.

Jade Rabbit 2 went after the first landing to the "nap" mode to survive in the sweltering 200 ° C (390 ° F) Monday which lasts 14 earth days.

It was stirred by its forced slumber while the brutal temperatures went down for the transition to a moon night of 300 hours.

Also, by the end of the week, a first-person glimpse of Chang & # 39; e-4's final approach appeared when it grounded its groundbreaking landing on the turbulent terrain of the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) Basin, the largest and deepest, completed. impact crater in the solar system.

Photos on social media have also revealed that both the lander, Chang & e-4, and the rover, Yutu-2, photo & # 39; s made the other. This heavenly photo shoot gives a stunning look at the machine that China currently uses on the other side of the moon. Pictured, Chang & # 39; e-4

Photos on social media have also revealed that both the lander, Chang & e-4, and the rover, Yutu-2, photo & # 39; s made the other. This heavenly photo shoot gives a stunning look at the machine that China currently uses on the other side of the moon. Pictured, Chang & # 39; e-4

  Jade-Rabbit 2 (photo) was hijacked by the much larger Chang & # 39; e-4 lander. On the machine are solar panels and a small Chinese flag to see, as well as the tracks that reveal that it was rotated by the six independently driven wheels, only for the photo

Jade-Rabbit 2 (photo) was hijacked by the much larger Chang & # 39; e-4 lander. On the machine are solar panels and a small Chinese flag to see, as well as the tracks that reveal that it was rotated by the six independently driven wheels, only for the photo

A statement from the Chinese Space Agency, CNSA, said: "Researchers have completed the preliminary analysis of the topographic top of the moon around the landing site based on the image made by the landing camera. & # 39;

Chang & # 39; e-4, the Yutu-2 and the Queqiao relay satellite that transports data back to earth are all in a stable state and all work is done as planned & # 39 ;, the statement concluded .

A message from the social media account of the Yutu-2 rover on the Chinese microblogging website Weibo on January 11 at 11:22 Beijing read the time: & # 39; Would you like to make a 360-degree moon walk? Here is a panoramic photo with high resolution of the moon made by my fourth sister.

& # 39; Just recently my fourth sister looked around and conquered the environment around us with an annular topographic camera, including me, you see? & # 39;

The Communist Party in China has since issued a statement in which they congratulate the efforts that are the first time the secret government has formally recognized the success of the mission.

It was reported by China Central Television Station and it said: & # 39; The central committee of the Community Party of China, the State Council and the Central Military Commission send congratulations to the successful completion of the Chang & # 39; e 4 moon research project. # 39;

A message from the social media account of the Yutu-2 rover on the Chinese microblogging website Weibo on January 11 at 11:22 Beijing read the time: & # 39; Would you like to make a 360-degree moon walk? Here is a high resolution panoramic photo of the moon taken by my fourth sister & # 39; (photo)

A message from the social media account of the Yutu-2 rover on the Chinese microblogging website Weibo on January 11 at 11:22 Beijing read the time: & # 39; Would you like to make a 360-degree moon walk? Here is a high resolution panoramic photo of the moon taken by my fourth sister & # 39; (photo)

There is also an image of a first-person look at the last approach of Chang & # 39; e-4 while its pioneering landing on the turbulent terrain in the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) Basin, the largest and deepest impact crater in the solar energy, completed. system

There is also an image of a first-person look at the last approach of Chang & # 39; e-4 while its pioneering landing on the turbulent terrain in the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) Basin, the largest and deepest impact crater in the solar energy, completed. system

The newly released images show the last approach of the last eight kilometers (8 km) of the mission before it was touched (photo). The stunning video has been released after the formal recognition of the success of the Chang & # 39; e-4 mission of the communist political party earlier today

The newly released images show the last approach of the last eight kilometers (8 km) of the mission before it was touched (photo). The stunning video has been released after the formal recognition of the success of the Chang & # 39; e-4 mission of the communist political party earlier today

The mission took a short break after landing to shut down the machines on Yutu-2 and withstand the brutal lunar day.

The lunar month of the moon lasts 14 earth days and the absence of an atmosphere means that the heat is ruthless and unabated, unlike on earth.

Yutu-2 has updated its Weibo account and the message is: & # 39; Afternoon trip is over. [It’s time to] stand up and stretch my legs. & # 39;

The rover then resumed activities, including taking a picture of the front of the lander and reconnaissance missions.

China's Chinese rover returned to work on the other side of the moon after waking up from a five-day hibernation, the official social media page announced yesterday.

China's Chinese rover returned to work on the other side of the moon after waking up from a five-day hibernation, the official social media page announced yesterday.

Yutu-2, or Jade Rabbit 2, has its own social media account and will be posted on January 10th: & # 39; Afternoon nap is over. [It's time to] stand up and stretch my legs & # 39; (pictured)

Yutu-2, or Jade Rabbit 2, has its own social media account and will be posted on January 10th: & # 39; Afternoon nap is over. [It’s time to] stand up and stretch my legs & # 39; (pictured)

Yutu-2 has a large number of instruments and is powered by solar panels. Unlike the comparable probe onboard the Chang & # 39; e-3 mission, this robber does not have a robotic arm. It announced afterwards that it is a nap & # 39; will do to protect against the immense heat of the sun on the moon

Yutu-2 has a large number of instruments and is powered by solar panels. Unlike the comparable probe onboard the Chang & # 39; e-3 mission, this robber does not have a robotic arm. It announced afterwards that it is a nap & # 39; will do to protect against the immense heat of the sun on the moon

Another Weibo user, a Twitter-like microblog site in China, said: & # 39; Your nap is so long. & # 39;

Another addition: & # 39; If you do not get up now, your turnip will be torn away by the aliens. & # 39;

Twitter is blocked by the Chinese government, but the microblog site Weibo is popular in the country and the messages from Yutu-2 are made there.

The social media account followed the announcement yesterday with an airy tweet and explained why the stars were not visible in the images of Yutu-2 from Chang & # 39; e-4.

It was: & # 39; Good evening. I've seen so many stars these few days.

& # 39; The moon is a suitable place to look at stars. Regardless of whether it is day or night, the air is always pitch black. Without the interruption of an atmosphere, the stars are bright places that do not sparkle.

& # 39; A day on the moon is more than 600 hours (about 27 earth days). You need half a day to travel from one side of the horizon to the other.

& # 39; So that I can look at a star continuously for more than 300 hours.

& # 39; The photo made by my fourth sister (Chang & # 39; e 4), because the light ratio is too high, some details have disappeared. You can not see the starry sky that I have seen. I'll sign it for you. & # 39;

The social media account followed the announcement with an airy tweet and explained why the stars were not visible in the images of Yutu-2 from Chang's e-4. It read: The photo taken by my fourth sister (Chang & e-4), because the light ratio is too high, some details have disappeared. You can not see the starry sky that I have seen. I will sign it for you & # 39; (photo)

The social media account followed the announcement with an airy tweet and explained why the stars were not visible in the images of Yutu-2 from Chang's e-4. It read: The photo taken by my fourth sister (Chang & e-4), because the light ratio is too high, some details have disappeared. You can not see the starry sky that I have seen. I will sign it for you & # 39; (photo)

The Chinese space agency has said that the mission has lifted the mysterious veil & # 39; on the other side of the moon, which has never been seen from the earth, and & # 39; has opened a new chapter in the human exploration of the Moon & # 39 ;.

Experts say that the vessel will not be able to function indefinitely and possibly only work for one day.

"Of course, it will never leave the moon, so the question is how long it can remain operational," said Professor Ian Crawford of the Earth and Planetary Sciences Department at Birkbeck College, London.

I suspect they will hope at least one Monday – 14 earth days – after which, if it works, they will have to hibernate during the 14-day moon night because it works on solar energy and then hopefully wakes up again.

& # 39; That's a big order because the moon night is so cold – about -180 ° C (-292 ° F). & # 39;

A message from January 5 at 9:42 PM GMT on the official account number of the Yutu Lunar Rover explained why the rover went into & # 39; dut & # 39; mode for the first time on January 5th.

It said: & # 39; Ya, it's getting hot here.

& # 39; At this moment the back of the moon has entered the time of day, there is no atmosphere to block the heat and the temperature reaches 200 ° C.

& # 39; To protect important parts and avoid extreme conditions, I have to keep a siesta for a while. & # 39;

Yutu-2 rover explained how it would survive the harsh conditions on the arid surface of the moon after announcing the need for his rest.

Twitter is blocked by the Chinese government but the microblog site Weibo is popular in the country and the messages from Yutu-2 are made there (photo). A message from January 5th at 21.42 GMT on the official account number of the Yutu Lunar Rover was: & # 39; Ya, it's called here & # 39;

Twitter is blocked by the Chinese government but the microblog site Weibo is popular in the country and the messages from Yutu-2 are made there (photo). A message from January 5th at 21.42 GMT on the official account number of the Yutu Lunar Rover was: & # 39; Ya, it's called here & # 39;

& # 39; My masters have given me thick insulating components. My golden jacket could reflect strong light, & # 39; it went on.

& # 39; There are variable heat conduction tubes, adjustable two-phase electric fluid circuits, etc. And they can control my temperature to below 55 ° C.

& # 39; (I have to be proud that even the small Chinese flag on my chest can withstand high temperatures!) There are no photos, just a print drawing. Here it is.)

The post also gave some insight into the Chang & # 39; e-4 lander who brought the rover to the surface by referring to the much larger lander as his & fourth; fourth sister & # 39 ;.

The following: & # 39;[Its] heat control abilities are stronger than mine. She will still perform a series of surveying work during my siesta. You worked hard. & # 39;

The Weibo-post of Yutu-2 explained that the machine did not really go out during the snooze mid-day. It simply went into standby mode.

In this form it was charged via solar panels, added to the & # 39; diary & # 39 ;, steering material sent and readers told stories about the moon.

The post was ready: "I did not expect to take a break after a day's work, but it is an important mission to protect itself.

Master, do not forget to wake me up early when work begins again. & # 39;

Zhang Yuhua, deputy chief commander of the mission, told the Chinese state media: "Afterwards the rover will go to his planned area and start a series of scientific exploration projects in the Von Kármán crater as planned by scientists. & # 39;

Jade Rabbit 2 weighs 308 lbs (139kg) and has six individually driven wheels so that it can continue to work even if a wheel fails. It rolled through two slopes on the moon surface of the lander and explored the Von Karman crater in the southern part of the other side of the moon

Jade Rabbit 2 weighs 308 lbs (139kg) and has six individually driven wheels so that it can continue to work even if a wheel fails. It rolled through two slopes on the moon surface of the lander and explored the Von Karman crater in the southern part of the other side of the moon

It is expected that after a few days of activity the lander will re-enter & # 39; to prepare for the moon night.

This period lasts 14 days and can see temperatures drop to a cold -180 ° C (-292 ° F).

The Yutu-2 – or Jade Rabbit 2 – rover rode on the slope of his lander and on the outside of the other side of the moon at 10:22 am Beijing time (2:22 pm GMT) on January 3, about 12 hours after the Chinese spacecraft with it came to rest.

The Chinese space agency later published a photo online and unveiled the moon rover a few meters away from the spacecraft.

The traces it makes on the surface of the moon will forever be immortalized and will never be lost, because there is no wind on the moon because of the lack of an atmosphere.

By 5:00 pm Beijing time (9:00 GMT), the three 15-foot-long antennas at Chang & # 39; e-4 also completely unfurled to allow the low-frequency radio spectrometre to go to work.

Jade Rabbit 2 has six individually driven wheels so that it can continue to work even if a wheel fails.

He can climb a hill of 20 degrees or an obstacle of up to 20 cm high and the maximum speed is 200 meters per hour.

The groundbreaking rover is 1.5 m long and about 3 m wide and long, with two folding solar panels and six wheels.

Yutu-2 and the associated lander will conduct mineral, biological and radiation tests prior to a future base that China hopes to build on the moon.

There have been countless moon landings due to the space race between the US and the USSR of the 20th century - including the famous Apollo 11 mission where Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first people on the moon. After Luna 24 landed on August 18, the next moon landing was the Chinese mission Chang & # 39; e-3 on December 14, 2013. Chang & # 39; e-4 is the first spacecraft to land on the other side of the moon

There have been countless moon landings due to the space race between the US and the USSR of the 20th century – including the famous Apollo 11 mission where Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first people on the moon. After Luna 24 landed on August 18, the next moon landing was the Chinese mission Chang & # 39; e-3 on December 14, 2013. Chang & # 39; e-4 is the first spacecraft to land on the other side of the moon

The mission consists of three basic components - the rover, the lander and the relay satellite. They will work together to study, analyze and send information to scientists on earth

The mission consists of three basic components – the rover, the lander and the relay satellite. They will work together to study, analyze and send information to scientists on earth

Results from these experiments could lead to new insights into the challenges of settlers who could ever colonize our natural satellite.

"It's a small step for the robber, but a big leap for the Chinese people", said Wu Weiren, the chief designer of the Lunar Exploration Project, against CCTV.

This gigantic leap is a decisive step for our exploration of space and the conquest of the universe. & # 39;

The rover is equipped with a variety of scientific instruments to analyze the surface of the moon, including a panoramic and infrared camera, a ground penetrating radar and a low-frequency radio spectrometer.

Professor Crawford added: "During operation, it will roam in the study of the composition of rocks, and the bottom surface with the aid of its ground penetrating radar.

& # 39; It will just stay on the moon if it stops working, unless it is collected one day and taken to a museum. & # 39;

The rover uses its panoramic camera to identify interesting locations and the Visible and Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (VNIS) will help analyze minerals in the crater.

This includes what scientists & # 39; ejecta & # 39; call – rocks that have been twisted from deep to the surface by impacts with meteors.

The Lunar Penetrating Radar (LPR) instrument looks down into the depths of the moon with a maximum vertical distance of about 300 feet (100 meters).

The rover is equipped with a variety of scientific instruments to analyze the surface of the moon, including a panoramic and infrared camera, a ground penetrating radar and a low-frequency radio spectrometer.

The rover is equipped with a variety of scientific instruments to analyze the surface of the moon, including a panoramic and infrared camera, a ground penetrating radar and a low-frequency radio spectrometer.

Never seen before & # 39; close to image & # 39; made by the Chinese spacecraft Chang & E-4 from the surface of the other side of the moon. It appears to include a reddish hue in some of the images released by China, an effect of the lights used by the probe

Never seen before & # 39; close to image & # 39; made by the Chinese spacecraft Chang & E-4 from the surface of the other side of the moon. It appears to include a reddish hue in some of the images released by China, an effect of the lights used by the probe

WHY CHINA WAS THE LAND IN THE VON KARMAN CRATER?

Chang & # 39; e-4 landed in the Von Karman crater in the South Pole-Aitken basin.

This is a huge crater located at the extreme southern point of the moon.

China chose to study the other side of the moon and thereby defeated all other nations to the historic moment.

The basin is so far the largest known basin of influence in the solar system.

The Chinese space agency hopes that by exploring the enormous divot on the surface of the moon, they can shed some light on its history and geology by collecting stones that have never been seen before.

Researchers hope that the enormous depth of the crater will enable them to study the mantle of the moon, the layer below the surface, of the moon.

It is assumed that the crater consists of various chemical compounds, including thorium, iron oxide and titanium dioxide.

Er wordt ook gehoopt dat de wetenschappers, door dit 8 mijls diepe litteken op het oppervlak van de maan te beoordelen, aanwijzingen konden vinden om de oorsprong van de maanmantel aan elkaar te passen.

Er is ook een andere logistieke reden voor de keuze van de landingsplaats, de krater is meestal vlak in het zuiden van het stroomgebied.

Dit verhoogde de kans op een succesvolle landing.

De Yutu-2 - of Jade Rabbit 2 - rover reed op de helling van zijn lander en op de buitenkant van de overkant van de maan om 10:22 uur Beijing tijd (2:22 pm GMT) op donderdag, ongeveer 12 uur nadat het Chinese ruimtevaartuig het droeg kwam tot rust. Het Chinese ruimtevaartagentschap publiceerde later online een foto en onthulde de maanrover op enkele meters afstand van het ruimtevaartuig

De Yutu-2 – of Jade Rabbit 2 – rover reed op de helling van zijn lander en op de buitenkant van de overkant van de maan om 10:22 uur Beijing tijd (2:22 pm GMT) op donderdag, ongeveer 12 uur nadat het Chinese ruimtevaartuig het droeg kwam tot rust. Het Chinese ruimtevaartagentschap publiceerde later online een foto en onthulde de maanrover op enkele meters afstand van het ruimtevaartuig

Experimenten van zaden en planten die vanaf de aarde aan boord van de Chang'e-4-sonde naar de maan werden gebracht, zullen worden uitgevoerd in de maanlander zelf.

In tegenstelling tot zijn voorganger, de Chang'e-3-missie, heeft de nieuwste toevoeging aan het oppervlak van de maan geen robotarm.

De lander heeft ook een laagfrequente radio spectrometer (LFS) die deel zal uitmaken van een wetenschappelijk experiment om de ruimte te bestuderen zonder de constante radio-interferentie van de aarde.

Aan de andere kant van de maan schermen beschermt de apparatuur tegen het geluid en zorgt ervoor dat Chang'e-4 een laagradio-emissie-kaart van de lucht produceert.

Dr. Matthew Bothwell, een astronoom aan de Universiteit van Cambridge, vertelde aan MailOnline dat dit een cruciale stap zou kunnen zijn in de toekomst van de ruimte-exploratie en vergeleek het belang ervan met dat van de eerste telescoop.

'De andere kant van de maan is de enige plek in het bereikbare universum dat we in staat zijn om dit soort onderzoek te doen.

WAT BETEKENEN DE NAMEN VAN CHINA'S MAAN-MISSIE?

Chang'e-4

Chang'e is de maangodin en echtgenote van god Houyi in de oude Chinese mythologie.

Houyi is een van de meest krachtige mythologische figuren in China.

Er wordt gezegd dat hij negen zonnen neerhaalde om de aarde een leefbaar leefgebied voor de mens te maken.

Het nummer vier in de naam is een modernere knipoog naar het ruimteprogramma.

Dit ruimteschip is de vierde van de Chang'e-missies.

Yutu-2

Yutu (jade konijn) is de metgezel van Chang'e in de mythologische verhalen.

Dit is toepasselijk ook de naam van de rover aan boord van Chang'e-4.

Yutu-2 is so labelled because it is the successor to Yutu-1 which was deployed from the Chang'e-3 mission earlier this decade.

Queqiao

Queqiao is the relay satellite and translates to Magpie Bridge.

This name also stems from Ancient Chinese mythology.

Queqiao, or the Magpie Bridge, is a legendary bridge which appears once a year to connect Niu Lang and Zhi Nv.

Niu Lang is a cattle herder on Earth while Zhi Nv, or the Weaving Maid, is a goddess in heaven.

The couple met and fell in love when Zhi Nv snuck to the 'human world' in secret to play. Their union enraged the chief goddess, Queen Mother of the West.

The couple got banished to live at different sides of the Milky Way.

Every year on the seventh day of the seventh month on the Lunar Calendar, thousands of magpies that are moved by the couples' love story will form the Magpie Bridge, or Queqiao, so that Niu Lang and Zhi Nv can meet each other.

This relay satellite will allow communication between the moon probe and Earth.

'Putting an object as large as the moon between the Earth's constant beaming of radio waves and the antennaes is a fantastic way of filtering out noise from Earth.

'Very long wavelength radiowaves are impossible to study due to their universal beaming of radio waves 24/7 and the emissions from the universe is really faint in comparison.'

Dr Bothwell added that there is no way of knowing what this could reveal and the opportunities for discovery are enormous.

'It will provide a new window to look at the universe and we will likely find unexpected things,' he added.

Dr Bothwell also said that depending on the success of the data gathered by Chang'e-4, it could lead to a ground-based telescope being installed on the far side of the moon.

The far side can't be seen from Earth and is popularly called the 'dark side' because it is relatively unknown, not because it lacks sunlight.

As the landing is happening on the dark side of the moon it required its own satellite to be able to send information back.

To facilitate communication between controllers on Earth and the Chang'e-4 mission, China launched a relay satellite named Queqiao on 20 May and is now stationed in operational orbit about 40,000 miles beyond the moon.

This will be the primary form of communication between Earth and the spacecraft.

The probe and explorer will use Queqiao to get their findings back to China.

Its descent was also aided by the relay satellite, the Queqiao, or Magpie Bridge.

This is positioned at a place in space called L2, a Langraine point.

A Lagrange point is a spot in space where the combined gravitational forces of two large bodies are equivalent to the centrifugal force of another body.

L2 is a million miles beyond Earth in the opposite direction to the sun and for an object to remain stationary there it depends on a fragile equilibrium between the gravitational pull of the moon, Earth and the Sun.

The far side of the moon – colloquially known as the dark side – actually gets as much light as the near side but always faces away from Earth.

This is because the moon is tidally locked to Earth, rotating at the same rate that it orbits our planet, so the far side – or the 'dark side' – is never visible from our planet.

This relatively unexplored region is mountainous and rugged, making a successful landing much harder to achieve.

Beijing is pouring billions into the military-run programme, with hopes of having a crewed space station by 2022, and of eventually sending humans to the moon.

The Chang'e-4 lunar probe mission – named after the moon goddess in Chinese mythology – launched in December 2018 from the southwestern Xichang launch centre.

It is the second Chinese probe to land on the moon, following the Yutu rover mission in 2013.

China announced that in honour of this success the rover on-board Chang'e-4 has been named Yutu 2.

Previous spacecraft have seen the far side of the moon, but none has landed on it.

A TIMELINE OF HOW CHINA REACHED THE FAR SIDE OF THE MOON

Chang'e-4 launched from the Xichang satellite launch centre in Sichuan, south-west China at 6:30 GMT on December 7

Chang'e-4 launched from the Xichang satellite launch centre in Sichuan, south-west China at 6:30 GMT on December 7

October 24 2007 – China launches Chang'e-1, an unmanned satellite, into space where it remains operational for more than a year.

October 1 2010 – China launches Chang'e-2. This was part of the first phase of the Chinese moon programme. It was in a 100-km-high lunar orbit to gather data for the upcoming Chang'e-3 mission.

September 29, 2011 – China launched Tiangong 1.

September 15 2013 – A second space lab, Tiangong 2, is launched.

December 1 2013 – Chang'e-3 launched.

December 14 2013 – Chang'e-3, a 2,600 lb (1,200 kg) lunar probe landed on the near side of the moon successfully. It became the first object to soft-land on the Moon since Luna 24 in 1976.

April 1 2018 – Tiangong-1 crashed into Earth at 17,000 mph and lands in the ocean off the coast if Tahiti.

May 20 2018 – China launched a relay satellite named Queqiao which is stationed in operational orbit about 40,000 miles beyond the moon. This is designed to enable Chang'e-4 to communicate wit engineers back on Earth.

The Chang'e-4 lunar rover is lifted into space from the Xichang launch centre in Xichang in China's southwestern Sichuan province on December 7

The Chang'e-4 lunar rover is lifted into space from the Xichang launch centre in Xichang in China's southwestern Sichuan province on December 7

December 7 2018 – Chinese space agency announces it has launched the Chang'e-4 probe into space.

December 12 2018 –  Retrorockets on the probe fired to stabilise the spacecraft and slow it down.

December 31 2018 –   The probe prepared for the first-ever soft landing on the far side of the moon.

Estimated for 2020 – Tiangong 3,a follow-up mission to the Tiangong-2

Before 2033 – China plans for its first uncrewed Mars exploration program.

2040 – 2060 – The Asian superpower is planning a crewed mission to Mars.

The probe entered lunar orbit 'to prepare for the first-ever soft landing on the far side of the moon', the China National Space Administration said at the time.

The tasks of the Chang'e-4 include astronomical observation, surveying the moon's terrain, landform and mineral composition, and measuring the neutron radiation and neutral atoms to study the environment on the far side of the moon.

Researchers hope the seeds will grow to blossom on the Moon, with the process captured on camera and transmitted to Earth.

China aims to catch up with Russia and the United States to become a major space power by 2030.

It is planning to launch construction of its own manned space station next year and have its own lunar base by 2036.

Dr Bothwell said: 'The success of the landing and of this mission puts china in a very strong position among other nations.

'The co-operation between the space agencies is great for science and is a case of humanity working together to understand more about the mysteries and issues of the universe.

'Possibly the best thing that could happen is another space race similar to the competition between the US and Russia in the 60s and 70s.

'With ESA, Roscosmos and NASA all taking significant steps and the private space race between SpaceX and other firms hotting up, it could bring about a renaissance in space exploration.'

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