Can not get a job? Get a tattoo! Body art is now so fashionable that it makes you more likely to get a job

If you are struggling to find work, it might be worth considering a tattoo.

Job seekers are more likely to be hired if the interviewer discovers ink on their skin, according to new research.

This is because the work of art offers potential candidates an advantage over their peers, since tattoos help them look more fashionable.

The two-year study also found that the salaries and annual earnings of tattooed employees were statistically indistinguishable from those who did not.

The investigators warned that bosses who continue to discriminate against people with tattoos may be content with a less qualified applicant.

Job seekers are more likely to be hired if the interviewer discovers ink on their skin, according to new research that suggests that body art benefits people. In the picture is David Beckham, who is very tattooed

Job seekers are more likely to be hired if the interviewer discovers ink on their skin, according to new research that suggests that body art benefits people. In the picture is David Beckham, who is very tattooed

The research was conducted by the University of Miami Business School.

The researchers, who surveyed more than 2,000 people across the United States in the past two years, found that in the hiring market, tattooed job seekers were just as likely, and in some cases even more, to get a job.

"The long-standing stigmas associated with tattoos, and in particular the visible ones, may be eroding, especially among younger people who see body art as a natural and common form of personal expression," said lead author, Professor Michael. French, health economist at the University of Miami Business School.

"Given the increasing prevalence of tattoos in society – around 40 percent for young adults – hiring managers and supervisors who discriminate against tattooed workers are likely to be at a competitive disadvantage for the most skilled employees."

According to the researchers, the salaries and annual earnings of tattooed employees were statistically indistinguishable from those who did not.

It is estimated that a fifth of British adults have a tattoo, which rises to about three in ten between the ages of 16 to 44. Meanwhile, about 20 percent of American adults have tattoos.

Traditionally, it has been said that those with ink are risking their careers, with many senior managers of a previous generation whose traditional view may be that it means a less reliable character.

This view has been corroborated by previous research, which suggested that bosses generally see tattooed people as less employable.

However, the latest research shows that attitudes may be changing.

"Surprisingly, our research found no evidence of employment, wage or salary discrimination against people with various types of tattoos," said the French professor at the University of Western Australia.

"In our sample, and considering a variety of alternative estimation techniques, not only the salaries and annual earnings of employees tattooed in the United States are statistically indistinguishable from the salaries and annual earnings of employees without tattoos, but also the tattooed people and, in some cases, even more likely, to obtain employment.

Researchers warn that bosses who continue to discriminate against tattooed people are settling for a less qualified group of applicants. In the picture is the actress, filmmaker and humanitarian Angelina Jolie with part of her tattoo collection

Researchers warn that bosses who continue to discriminate against tattooed people are settling for a less qualified group of applicants. In the picture is the actress, filmmaker and humanitarian Angelina Jolie with part of her tattoo collection

"These results suggest that, contrary to popular opinion, as well as to research findings with hiring managers and clients, having a tattoo does not seem to be associated with disadvantage or discrimination in the labor market."

In the United Kingdom, the law on equality in the workplace does not cover those with tattoos as a protected feature.

"Previous research has found that tattooed people are widely perceived by hiring managers as less employable than people without tattoos," said Professor French.

This is especially the case for those who have visible, particularly offensive, tattoos that are difficult to hide.

In the recruitment market, tattooed job seekers had the same probability, and in some cases even more, of getting a job. Pictured is Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau

In the recruitment market, tattooed job seekers had the same probability, and in some cases even more, of getting a job. Pictured is Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau

Two years ago, a study of almost 200 managers in the United Kingdom and the USA. UU He suggested that having tattoos can actually increase employment opportunities where the clientele is younger.

He found that managers looking for a waiter for a hypothetical nightclub gave higher ratings to the images in which the candidate was tattooed.

Those looking for a waiter at an upscale restaurant, however, gave the tattooed images a lower rating.

The study at the University of St Andrews found offensive tattoos depicting misogynistic, satanic or fascist images, or anything related to alcohol or drugs, they were always unacceptable.

The full study was published in the journal Human Relations.

WHAT ARE THE MOST ANCIENT TATTOOS OF THE WORLD?

Since its discovery on December 19, 1991 by German hikers, Ötzi (artist's impression) has provided a window into primitive human history.

Since its discovery on December 19, 1991 by German hikers, Ötzi (artist's impression) has provided a window into primitive human history.

Since its discovery on December 19, 1991 by German hikers, Ötzi has provided a window into early human history.

His mummified remains were discovered in the melting glacier on the mountainous border between Austria and Italy.

The analysis of the body has told us that he was alive during the Copper Age and died of a horrifying death.

Ötzi, who was 46 years old at the time of his death, had brown eyes, relatives in Sardinia and was lactose intolerant.

The experts discovered a total of 61 tattoos on Ötzi's body using different wavelengths of light to distinguish them from the dark skin of the mummy.

And in December 2015, it was confirmed that they were the oldest brands in the world: marks of blows in an unidentified South American Chinchorro mummy.

Experts had thought that the South American mummy with a tattoo like a mustache on his face died around 4000 BC. C., before realizing that he is younger than Ötzi, who died in about 3250 BC.

While researchers can not be sure why Ötzi had tattoos, many think they served as a form of acupuncture.

"We know they were real tattoos," Albert Zink, director of the Mummy and Iceman Institute in Bolzano, Italy, told LiveScience.

The old tattoo artist who applied them made the incisions in the skin, and then they put charcoal mixed with some herbs & # 39;

The tattoos, which are mainly found on the lower back and legs of Ötzi, between the knee and the food, may have been a way to alleviate the effects of chronic pain or injuries.

The experts discovered a total of 61 tattoos on Ötzi's body using different wavelengths of light to distinguish them from the dark skin of the mummy and in December 2015 it was confirmed that they were the oldest in the world.

The experts discovered a total of 61 tattoos on Ötzi's body using different wavelengths of light to distinguish them from the dark skin of the mummy and in December 2015 it was confirmed that they were the oldest in the world.

It was thought that Ötzi had walked a lot through the Alps, which could have caused joint pain in the knees and ankles.

The 61st tattoo, found on the rib cage, has baffled researchers who suggest that Ötzi could also suffer from chest pain.

If the tattoos were not for therapeutic benefit, the researchers say they may have had a symbolic or religious significance.

Alternatively, they may simply be geometric shapes with no hidden meaning.

In March 2018, figurative tattoos were discovered in 5,000-year-old Egyptian mummies at the British Museum.

Experts said that these were the first figurative tattoos in the world.

The tattoos are of a wild bull and a Barbary sheep on the upper arm of a male mummy, and S-shaped motifs on the upper arm and shoulder of a woman.

The finding dates tattoos that contain images instead of geometric patterns 1,000 years earlier than previously thought.

The researchers said the discovery "transforms" our understanding of how people lived during this period.

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