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Boer, 26, loses her sense of smell and taste after breaking her skull in a horror quad-crash

A farmer lost her sense of smell and taste when she broke her skull in a quad-crash because she wasn’t wearing a helmet.

Beca Glyn, 26, said she was lucky to live after the horror accident at her family farm in Betws-y-Coed, Conwy, North Wales.

She had ridden a quad in her meadows when she waved sharply to prevent sheep falling on her head.

An ambulance rushed to the scene to take Mrs. Glyn to the hospital with injuries to her head and neck. She spent nine months in rehabilitation.

Mrs. Glyn lost her sense of taste and smell, an incurable condition known as anosmia that can be caused by a brain injury or stroke.

She said, “If I wore a helmet, I could still enjoy the delicious smell and taste of a roast lamb dinner prepared with garlic and rosemary.”

Beca Glyn, 26, from Betws-y-Coed, Conwy, Wales, lost her sense of smell and taste when she broke her skull in a quad-crash because she wasn't wearing a helmet

Beca Glyn, 26, from Betws-y-Coed, Conwy, Wales, lost her sense of smell and taste when she broke her skull in a quad-crash because she wasn’t wearing a helmet

Mrs. Glyn had worked on her family’s 350-hectare farm when she crashed an ATV (vehicle on all terrains, photo). She said she was “lucky to live”

On the day of the March 2018 incident, Mrs. Glyn worked on her family’s 350-hectare farm, where her family ran a herd of 1,000 sheep and a herd of cattle.

She collected sheep from a field and over a small country road while she was riding an ATV (all terrain vehicle) when the animals took a wrong turn.

Mrs. Glyn said: “The sheep started moving in the wrong direction, I panicked and thought in that split second that the dog might not be able to bring the sheep back correctly, but if that’s the case I risked driving. “

She then turned her quad before it collapsed. Her head hit concrete and the bike fell on top of her and hit her unconscious.

Her father, Glyn and a neighbor could lift her bike and call the emergency services, Pioneer in North Wales reports.

Mrs. Glyn said: “I know I am very lucky that I am alive and that I have made enormous progress, but I also know that if I had worn a helmet and had followed a training on how to safely drive an ATV (All Terrain Vehicle) ), I may not have ended up in the hospital at all. “

During the treatment, it was discovered that Mrs. Glyn’s senses were damaged.

Mrs. Glyn lost her sense of taste and smell after the March 2018 accident. The incurable condition is known as anosmia and can be caused by a brain injury or stroke

Mrs. Glyn lost her sense of taste and smell after the March 2018 accident. The incurable condition is known as anosmia and can be caused by a brain injury or stroke

Mrs. Glyn lost her sense of taste and smell after the March 2018 accident. The incurable condition is known as anosmia and can be caused by a brain injury or stroke

Mrs. Glyn warns the other person about the importance of wearing a helmet

Mrs. Glyn warns the other person about the importance of wearing a helmet

Mrs. Glyn warns the other person about the importance of wearing a helmet

WHAT IS ANOSMIA?

Anosmia is the total loss of sense of smell, while hyposmia is partial loss.

After a brain injury, many people report that their taste and / or sense of smell has been affected.

This can be a result of injury to the nasal cavities, damage to the nerves in the nose and mouth or to parts of the brain itself.

Loss or changes in odor and taste mainly occur after serious brain damage or stroke and, if the effects are due to damage to the brain itself, recovery is rare.

If recovery occurs, it is usually within a few months of the injury and recovery after more than two years is rare.

Unfortunately, there are no treatments available for loss of taste and odor.

Source: Headway The Association for Brain Injury

Loss or changes in odor and taste can occur after a brain injury, small or severe, and can result from damage to the nerves in the brain.

Other causes of loss of complete odor loss, called anosmia, include aging, diabetes, Parkinson’s and schizophrenia, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Rarely will patients recover from a case as serious as Mrs. Glyn’s, and she said, “I hope my sense of taste and smell returns, but the longer it lasts, the less likely it is.”

Now Glyn warns the other person about the importance of wearing a helmet.

She said: ‘If I had worn a helmet, I would be fine.

“I could still feel that fantastic feeling of expectation when I am in one of my favorite tapas restaurants.

“So much has changed since my accident. Although I try different remedies and therapies, I am still affected every day by disturbed sleep patterns.

“I would give anything not to struggle with the months of exhaustion I had endured after the least effort.

“You cannot appreciate your health and well-being, as I have discovered the hard way.”

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