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Bali will reopen for tourism in July as locals express their frustration with the government

The tropical vacation island of Bali will reopen in July as Indonesians express their growing frustration with the government’s response to COVID-19.

Officials said they plan to open the island in three months as the tourist hot spot has successfully fought the outbreak compared to other regions in the country.

“Most of the cases in Bali have been imported, the ones who have returned to Bali – especially workers who worked on cruise ships around the world,” Bali’s government official, I Gusti Agung Ngurah Rai Suryawijaya, said. ABC news.

The revised date comes days after Secretary of Tourism Secretary Ni Wayan Giri Adnyani said Bali could be open as early as October.

Officials have announced that Bali will be reopened in July after successfully combating the coronavirus outbreak. Pictured is Bachelor Australia star Anna Heinrich on a vacation on the popular island

Officials have announced that Bali will be reopened in July after successfully combating the coronavirus outbreak. Pictured is Bachelor Australia star Anna Heinrich on a vacation on the popular island

By Monday, Bali had reported 348 cases of coronavirus and four deaths, a much lower death rate compared to 17,514 cases and 1,148 deaths across the archipelago.

Of the total in Indonesia, 489 new cases were reported on Sunday alone, but observers fear that this figure is much higher, as the testing rate in the country is low.

The decision to reopen Bali has been frustrated by allegations that the government ignored scientific advice and was inconsistent in treating the coronavirus outbreak.

Many Indonesians, including medical workers, have expressed their frustration on social media using the trending hashtag #IndonesiaTerserah (Whatever, Indonesia).

Others have rejected parts of the community that have caused outrage on a large scale by violating large-scale restrictions on social gatherings.

Last week, long lines and crowds were depicted at Jarkarta’s Soekarno-Hatta airport as crowds flocked to their hometown prior to Eid al-Fitr, the end of the holy Islamic month of Ramadan.

Many Indonesians, including medical workers, have taken to social media to express frustration with their government over the inconsistent approach to the COVID-19 crisis using the hashtag medical workers, and have taken to social media to express their frustration , using the hashtag #IndonesiaTerserah (Whatever, Indonesia) (shown)

Many Indonesians, including medical workers, have taken to social media to express frustration with their government over the inconsistent approach to the COVID-19 crisis using the hashtag medical workers, and have taken to social media to express their frustration , using the hashtag #IndonesiaTerserah (Whatever, Indonesia) (shown)

Many Indonesians, including medical workers, have taken to social media to express frustration with their government about the inconsistent approach to the COVID-19 crisis using the hashtag medical workers, and have used social media to express their frustration , using the hashtag #IndonesiaTerserah (Whatever, Indonesia) (shown)

Long lines and crowds were depicted at Jarkarta's Sukarno-Hatta airport as crowds flocked to their hometown prior to Eid al-Fitr, the end of the holy Islamic month of Ramadan, on May 14

Long lines and crowds were depicted at Jarkarta's Sukarno-Hatta airport as crowds flocked to their hometown prior to Eid al-Fitr, the end of the holy Islamic month of Ramadan, on May 14

Long lines and crowds were depicted at Jarkarta’s Sukarno-Hatta airport as crowds flocked to their hometown prior to Eid al-Fitr, the end of the holy Islamic month of Ramadan, on May 14

The annual exodus was banned by the national government, and travel exemptions were only granted to those who had to return home for economic reasons.

Meanwhile, earlier this month, hundreds of people gathered at Indonesia’s first McDonald’s for an event as it closed its doors permanently.

Photos shared online showed that people got together and broke social distance rules.

Management was later fined 10 million rupiah ($ 1,050) by the Jarkarta government for the violation.

Several medical researchers said they warned officials early in the outbreak that the death toll could reach 240,000 without proper intervention, but the government chose to listen to advisers rather than academics.

Consultants are usually former military personnel rather than public health experts.

A scientist said the data was rejected when they presented their COVID-19 model to officials.

“When they saw my numbers, they protested that” the numbers are not appropriate, “said the researcher, who wanted to remain anonymous.

“I got confused, this song is not a question of suitability – this is a scientific count.”

Indonesia is one of more than 100 countries that have supported Australia’s pressure for an independent investigation into the treatment of the coronavirus outbreak.

A woman takes in the view in Nusa Penida, Indonesia. Chief Medical Officer Brendan Murphy said on Friday that travel restrictions for Australians could be lifted as early as August or September

A woman takes in the view in Nusa Penida, Indonesia. Chief Medical Officer Brendan Murphy said on Friday that travel restrictions for Australians could be lifted as early as August or September

A woman takes in the view in Nusa Penida, Indonesia. Chief Medical Officer Brendan Murphy said on Friday that travel restrictions for Australians could be lifted as early as August or September

The city of Yogyakarta and the Riau Islands province are also high on the list for the Ministry of Tourism to at least partially reopen in October.

Bali’s economy largely depends on visitors. Gross domestic product (GDP) contracted 1.14 percent year-on-year in January-March, compared to national growth of 2.97 percent GDP.

Foreign tourists arriving in Indonesia fell by more than 60 percent in March, compared to a year earlier, and Chinese arrivals fell by more than 97 percent.

Last year, 1.23 million Australians visited Bali, an increase of 5.24 percent from 2018.

Chief Medical Officer Brendan Murphy said travel restrictions can be lifted after three to four months on Friday, meaning people can travel in August or September.

“I think we’re thinking of a three- to four-month planning framework for our next steps,” he said.

“We may be looking into taking some distance with very strong compensation through even stronger public health measures.

“But I wouldn’t foresee any material changes to border measures during that three- to four-month period.”

Australian citizens and permanent residents are currently unable to travel abroad for holiday purposes due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Exemptions are granted when travel is for relief, essentials, medical treatment not available in Australia, compassionate or humanitarian grounds, and national interest.

Tourists at Padang Padang Beach in Bali. Last year, 1.23 million Australians visited Bali, an increase of 5.24 percent from 2018

Tourists at Padang Padang Beach in Bali. Last year, 1.23 million Australians visited Bali, an increase of 5.24 percent from 2018

Tourists at Padang Padang Beach in Bali. Last year, 1.23 million Australians visited Bali, an increase of 5.24 percent from 2018

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