Australian newspaper is attacked online for duplicating its Selena Williams cartoons

The newspaper was condemned again after a preview of the main page was shared on Twitter

The Australian newspaper, whose vignette of a tantrum by Serena Williams sparked international controversy, has doubled in its stance with a challenging front page, and as a result provoked more scathing criticism.

The Herald Sun was criticized by celebrities and social media users for the description of Serena Williams by cartoonist Mark Knight during his crisis in the United States.

Many said that having a negative portray of the tennis star with exaggerated African features, big lips and wide nose, was racist.

In response, the cover of the newspaper presented on Wednesday another nine cartoons of knights of mocked politicians with grotesque and exaggerated characteristics, implying that Williams was not being singled out and the cartoon was not motivated by racial motives.

Along with Williams' cartoon were drawings by international political leaders Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un, along with local politicians such as Pauline Hanson, Tony Abbott, Barnaby Joyce and Scott Morrison.

The newspaper was condemned again after a preview of the main page was shared on Twitter

The newspaper was condemned again after a preview of the main page was shared on Twitter

Despite the outrage over Williams' description, the Herald Sun cover featured nine cartoons dedicated to exaggerated stereotypes on Wednesday.

Despite the outrage over Williams' description, the Herald Sun cover featured nine cartoons dedicated to exaggerated stereotypes on Wednesday.

Despite the outrage over Williams' description, the Herald Sun cover featured nine cartoons dedicated to exaggerated stereotypes on Wednesday.

"Welcome to PC World," said the headline, accompanied by a sign that signaled a "satire-free zone."

"If the so-called Mark Knight censors have their way in his Serena Williams cartoon, our new politically correct life will be very boring," said the subtitle.

Each caricature on the main page was accompanied by reasons for its rejection.

The resemblance of Kim Jong Un was described as "blocked" due to the "fat belly" of the North Korean leader, which was an "Asian stereotype", while a cartoon of Hanson as a cane toad was "forbidden" due to his "bulging eyes" "

The cartoons of federal Labor leader Bill Shorten and Victorian Prime Minister Daniel Andrews are also on the cover.

The newspaper's defense sparked greater condemnation among the online whistleblowers.

& # 39; Why not go full (Ku Klux) Klan? No one would blink, "said one person, accompanied by a caricature of a young black woman eating a watermelon.

& # 39; The Herald Sun: the place where you bend with racism & # 39; said another.

& # 39; The Herald Sun: the place where you bend with racism & # 39; said a Twitter user

& # 39; The Herald Sun: the place where you bend with racism & # 39; said a Twitter user

& # 39; The Herald Sun: the place where you bend with racism & # 39; said a Twitter user

& # 39; Herald Sun – trapped in 1908, while most of the rest of the country has advanced & # 39;, said another response.

Knight defended his illustration of Williams _ with the doll of a baby spit at his feet _ saying it had nothing to do with race.

"Sorry, it has been taken by social networks and distorted so much," he told 3AW.

Knight said he had tried to respond to comments made by people on social media "but they do not listen."

The Herald Sun was criticized by celebrities and social networks for the representation of cartoonist Mark Knight by Serena Williams during its merger in the United States.

The Herald Sun was criticized by celebrities and social networks for the representation of cartoonist Mark Knight by Serena Williams during its merger in the United States.

The Herald Sun was criticized by celebrities and social networks for the representation of cartoonist Mark Knight by Serena Williams during its merger in the United States.

"It's (Williams) great to draw, it's a powerful figure (and) it's very well formed."

The Herald Sun has also endorsed Knight in the face of international criticism.

The newspaper's publisher, Damon Johnston, said Knight's vignette had shown how "a tennis champion had a mega tantrum on the world stage."

"It has nothing to do with gender or race," he said in The Herald Sun.

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