Australian doctor breaks down the most common cold and flu myths – and reveals what to trust

Shocking figures show that nearly 50,000 Australians have already been diagnosed with influenza this year.

So if you try to take care of yourself while everyone around you is sniffing and sneezing, it pays to know what fact is and what fiction is.

Dr. Brad McKay recently appeared on Today to unpack a series of beliefs and misconceptions that people have about colds and flu.

Why vitamins don't keep you well how the flu shot doesn't make you sick, Dr. McKay invalidates six of the most common myths – and reveals what advice you should actually follow.

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If you look after yourself while everyone around you is sniffing and sneezing, it pays to know what is fact and what fiction is (stock image)

If you look after yourself while everyone around you is sniffing and sneezing, it pays to know what is fact and what fiction is (stock image)

1. The flu shot does not make you sick

Flu vaccines help the body to develop immunity through antibodies and offer protection against infection of the viruses contained in the vaccine.

And although there is a myth that the vaccine can really get you the flu or make you sick, Dr. McKay said this is not true.

In the days after you have taken an injection, you may have muscle pain or fever (most likely you will have a sore arm).

However, a complete attack of the vaccine flu is not possible.

Myth – Busted

Flu vaccines help the body to develop immunity through antibodies and offer protection against infection of the viruses contained in the vaccine (stock image)

Flu vaccines help the body to develop immunity through antibodies and offer protection against infection of the viruses contained in the vaccine (stock image)

Flu vaccines help the body to develop immunity through antibodies and offer protection against infection of the viruses contained in the vaccine (stock image)

2. Taking vitamins keeps you well

Taking vitamins, along with eating and enjoying a nutritionally healthy diet, has long been regarded as a way to control many forms of illness.

Vitamin C is usually the vitamin that many think taking the supplement can reduce or limit the severity of a cold.

Dr. McKay has squared this myth and said that multivitamins will not give you any insurance against getting sick, and that many get enough vitamin C from the food they eat.

& # 39; There are many anecdotal stories about people saying that they take vitamins every day and that they don't get sick, but when we look at population studies across the board, we notice that it makes no difference at all , & # 39; he said.

Myth – Busted

Australian doctor Dr. Brad McKay (photo) recently appeared on Today to explain which cold and flu myths were and which were not

Australian doctor Dr. Brad McKay (photo) recently appeared on Today to explain which cold and flu myths were and which were not

Australian doctor Dr. Brad McKay (photo) recently appeared on Today to explain which cold and flu myths were and which were not

Feed a cold and starve fever

If you are sick, chances are that the last thing you really want to do is eat. Although this is not a problem in itself, it can become one for the young or the elderly.

Dr. McKay said there are no rules in terms of what people should and should not eat when they have the flu, more they should keep track of their fluid intake to prevent dehydration.

This means that you will be given soup (broth), water or liquids such as lemonade or drinks with electrolytes.

Myth – Busted

4. Drinking hot tea with lemon and honey

If you have a sore throat and you have blue eyes, then you probably have a hot drink made of lemon and honey.

This remedy is one that has been passed down through the ages and it is one of which Dr. McKay said it's not bad at all for you.

In fact, he has revealed that the brew can help treat a cold.

While he said it won't make you feel better sooner, the honey component can reduce a cough and lemon will soothe a sore throat.

Myth – Proven

Taking vitamins together with eating a nutritionally healthy diet has long been considered a way to keep many forms of disease at bay (stock image)

Taking vitamins together with eating a nutritionally healthy diet has long been considered a way to keep many forms of disease at bay (stock image)

Taking vitamins together with eating a nutritionally healthy diet has long been considered a way to keep many forms of disease at bay (stock image)

What are the warning signs that you have sent back to the gym to be soon after the illness?

* Shortness of breath

* Higher than normal resting heart rate

* Dizziness

* General low energy

5. You cannot practice when you are sick

If you have a cold or flu, you should avoid exercise because the body is already in a stressed state by fighting an infection.

Dr. McKay said working out when you are sick can also mean that you unknowingly spread germs to others, especially if you are not sweeping equipment or washing your hands.

& # 39; You can also stress your entire body and endure your body with a lot of stress & # 39 ;, he said.

Myth – Proven

6. Being cold can make you sick

As a child, you were probably told that you should go to bed with wet hair or not wear a warm cardigan when it was cold could mean that you would get sick.

Although there is some common sense behind the suggestion, as a method to prevent a cold, the myth does not meet the test, the doctor said.

Usually because there is a chance that you have come into contact with someone who has the virus first, and this is why you are now sick.

Myth – Busted

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