Assad & # 39; s niece has frozen assets after finding that they live and study in London

The niece of the cruel dictator Assad (photo) has lived and studied in London

The niece of the cruel dictator Assad (photo) has lived and studied in London

The niece of the Syrian dictator Bashar al Assad has blocked her bank account because the National Crime Agency is trying to get hold of thousands of alleged illegal cash.

Anisseh Chawkat, the daughter of a security guard who died in a suicide attack, lived and studied in London.

It is thought that it is just under £ 25,000 and law enforcement officers are looking for money.

Mrs. Chawkat studied at the University of the Arts London and obtained a degree in spatial design, the Evening Standard reports.

It turned out the 22-year-old was in the capital in a hearing at Westminster Magistrates & Court.

Her presence raises questions about how she was able to get a visa and finance herself through her studies.

National Chief Agency (NCA) heads say their arguments for seizing the money are based on the student's lack of a valid source of income in Britain.

Pictured: the father of Chawkat, who was Assad's security leader

Pictured: the father of Chawkat, who was Assad's security leader

Pictured: the mother of Chawkat, who is the sister of the dictator

Pictured: the mother of Chawkat, who is the sister of the dictator

Pictured, left: the father of Chawkat, Assad's safety leader. Pictured, on the right: the mother of Chawkat, the sister of the dictator

This is accompanied by the fact that some of her family members were mentioned for international financial sanctions.

Chawkat's final annual project involved Selfridge & # 39; s Oxford Street store and focused on & # 39; the link between fashion and architecture & # 39 ;.

It is not yet known when she arrived in Great Britain, but last year she completed her spatial design BA at Elephant and Castle & London's College of Communication.

The basis falls under the University of the Arts, which also includes Central Saint Martins and the London College of Fashion.

A source told the newspaper that the student's relationship with Assad was known to the London College of Communications. Her visitors were Assad's son, Hafez al Assad.

& # 39; It was known who she was, but she kept it very quiet, & # 39; they said. & # 39; She also changed the spelling of her name, which was a bit strange. Her cousin [Hafez al Assad] also visited her once. He was quite recognizable. & # 39;

Pictured: former Syrian President Hafez al-Assad (right and right) poses with his family, including Bashar (back, second from left) and Bushra (back, far right)

Pictured: former Syrian President Hafez al-Assad (right and right) poses with his family, including Bashar (back, second from left) and Bushra (back, far right)

Pictured: former Syrian President Hafez al-Assad (right and right) poses with his family, including Bashar (back, second from left) and Bushra (back, far right)

Mrs. Chawkat, who is not supposed to be politically active, is now taking a master's in the capital.

Her address was denied to journalists on the grounds that disclosure could put her at risk of being attacked by Assad's opponents, including supporters of the Islamic State.

The student's mother, Bushra, is the dictator's sister and was described as a & # 39; feared reputation in Damascus & # 39; in the magazine The Economist in 2013.

The report claimed that it & # 39; significant influence & # 39; could exercise on the president.

She was one of the 12 Assad family members who were listed for EU sanctions in 2012 because she benefited from & was associated with & # 39; with the dictatorship because of her & # 39; close personal relationship and intrinsic financial relationship & # 39; with him and & # 39; other key figures of the Syrian regime & # 39 ;.

Her possessions were frozen and she was subject to a travel ban. She failed to destroy the sanctions two years later.

The European Court of Justice ruled that her move to Dubai after the death of her husband was not necessarily because she was trying to distance herself from Assad.

In the appeal, the court found that she may have moved to the UAE because of the deteriorating security in her war-torn home country.

Mrs. Chawkat's father, Assef, was Assad's head of military intelligence and deputy defense minister before his death in 2012.

He was killed by a rebel outside the National Security Bureau in Damascus. A year earlier, he was placed under US and EU sanctions for the part he played in suppressing demonstrations by opponents of the brutal Assad regime.

A spokesperson for Mrs. Chawkat told the newspaper that she was & # 39; a young student trying to complete a degree without political involvement & # 39 ;.

MailOnline has approached the home office to comment on why Mrs. Chawkat was allowed to live in the UK.