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Apple imagines a future desktop Mac made from a single sheet of curved GLASS

Apple imagines a future Mac desktop computer made with a single sheet of curved GLASS, reveals the patent

  • Apple filed a patent for an iMac redesign made from a single curved glass panel
  • The screen and an input section will be connected to each other by a ‘transition portion
  • The screen and input parts would include a screen and a keyboard, respectively.
  • Apple says its ‘transition portion’ will be made of ‘a continuous and cured surface’

Apple has developed plans for a radical redesign of its iMac desktop computer made entirely of a curved glass sheet.

An official patent filed in the US UU. And published last week reveals that the tech giant is at least entertaining the idea of ​​renewing its traditional computer aesthetic.

It proposes a sheet of curved glass supported by a wedge on the back that also serves as a housing for electrical components.

A space in the front could also be used to insert a keyboard, according to the patent.

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An official patent filed in the US UU. And published publicly last week reveals that the tech giant is at least entertaining the idea of ​​renewing its traditional computer aesthetic, with a patent that reveals a desk made of a single sheet of glass (pictured)

An official patent filed in the US UU. And published publicly last week reveals that the tech giant is at least entertaining the idea of ​​renewing its traditional computer aesthetic, with a patent that reveals a desk made of a single sheet of glass (pictured)

What is a patent?

The government grants a patent for an invention to the inventor, giving the inventor the right to detain others, for a limited period, to manufacture, use or sell the invention without their permission.

When patent protection is granted, it can be bought, sold, rented or rented.

Territoriality is made, and each government issues them to different places.

Apple-sized companies regularly file patents to protect future ideas against intellectual property theft.

Most do not come to fruition.

However, they serve as a good indicator of how a company plans to innovate.

The patent, published by the USPTO, was presented last year and was published online last week.

It speaks of an upper and lower potion that contains a viewing area and an entry area, respectively.

These will be joined by a ‘transition portion’ made of ‘a continuous curved surface’, the patent indicates.

The scope of the curve could also be adjusted, according to an aspect of the patent, which would allow for easier transport.

The patent proposes a curved blade supported by a wedge on the back that also serves as a housing for electrical components. A space in the front could also be used to insert a keyboard, says the patent (pictured)

The patent proposes a curved blade supported by a wedge on the back that also serves as a housing for electrical components. A space in the front could also be used to insert a keyboard, says the patent (pictured)

The patent proposes a curved blade supported by a wedge on the back that also serves as a housing for electrical components. A space in the front could also be used to insert a keyboard, says the patent (pictured)

The patent speaks of an upper and lower potion containing a viewing area and an entry area, respectively. These will be joined by a 'transition portion' made of 'a continuous curved surface'. Flexible glass could also be folded in a variety of ways (pictured)

The patent speaks of an upper and lower potion containing a viewing area and an entry area, respectively. These will be joined by a 'transition portion' made of 'a continuous curved surface'. Flexible glass could also be folded in a variety of ways (pictured)

The patent speaks of an upper and lower potion containing a viewing area and an entry area, respectively. These will be joined by a ‘transition portion’ made of ‘a continuous curved surface’. Flexible glass could also be folded in a variety of ways (pictured)

The patent was unearthed together with a separate presentation for small ‘finger devices’ equipped with sensors that allow people to interact with objects in AR or VR.

Various movements and gestures would be tracked by innumerable sensors that measure all kinds of metrics.

That entry could be used to control objects in mixed reality or virtual reality by moving your hands.

Both presentations reveal that Apple is working to improve its augmented and virtual reality capabilities, as well as to update its range of desktop computers.

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