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An anti-touch stamp that leaves a mark that is only visible under ultraviolet light, pictured, is sold out in Japan in less than an hour after sale

Anti-tact stamps with which victims can mark perverts with ink are sold out in Japan within an hour of being sold

  • Japanese developer Shachihata Inc has issued 500 chikan stamps yesterday
  • The anti-probing agent was sold out within an hour and only costs ¥ 2500 (£ 19)
  • Stamp leaves traces of open palm that can only be seen under ultraviolet light
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An anti-touch stamp with which victims can mark people they are trying to touch is sold out within an hour.

The Japanese developer Shachihata Inc released a limited number of products using special ink yesterday at 1 p.m.

It is hoped that the chikan (groper) stamps, which cost ¥ 2500 (£ 19), will help to address the problem of probing on busy trains, reports the Japan Times.

An anti-touch stamp that leaves a mark that is only visible under ultraviolet light, pictured, is sold out in Japan in less than an hour after sale

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An anti-touch stamp that leaves a mark that is only visible under ultraviolet light, pictured, is sold out in Japan in less than an hour after sale

In use, the stamp leaves the mark of an open palm that can only be seen under ultraviolet light.

The mark is not visible in sunlight, making it very discreet in public and can be used quickly because there is no cover.

A light included with the stamp can be used to reveal the 9-millimeter stamp and the mark can be washed off.

The product is easy to use because it has no lid. The mark can be washed off

The product is easy to use because it has no lid. The mark can be washed off

The product is easy to use because it has no lid. The mark can be washed off

Buyers of the product also receive a strap that can be attached to bags and show others that they have the stamp on it.

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Shachihata Inc. only released 500 of the stamps yesterday, but told customers on Twitter that if more were made they would post on their website.

A company spokesperson told the Japan Times that after testing, the company plans to modify the product based on feedback.

In a series of messages on the company's Twitter account, Shachihata said the stamp was just a & # 39; small step & # 39; used to be.

They said: & # 39; The most ideal would be a world free of sexual crimes. This is a small step. We continue to think of ways to contribute to society. & # 39;

Yayoi Matsunaga, head of the Osaka-based Chikan Yokushi Katsudo Center (Groping Prevention Activities Center), said the move & # 39; very meaningful & # 39; used to be.

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The introduction of an anti-groping product should have a major impact on society, which could lead to deterrence, she added.

Shachihata was inspired to develop the product in May after seeing a tweet from a woman who was advised to puncture a groper with a safety pin & # 39 ;, reports Ashai Shimbun.

It is hoped that the product will help address the problem of probing on busy trains. The photo shows people standing in line on the JR Station platform in Nagoya, Japan

It is hoped that the product will help address the problem of probing on busy trains. The photo shows people standing in line on the JR Station platform in Nagoya, Japan

It is hoped that the product will help address the problem of probing on busy trains. The photo shows people standing in line on the JR Station platform in Nagoya, Japan

Japanese developer Shachihata Inc has only issued 500 of the stamps, which come with a clip and light, are pictured, and changes are made after customers have given feedback

Japanese developer Shachihata Inc has only issued 500 of the stamps, which come with a clip and light, are pictured, and changes are made after customers have given feedback

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Japanese developer Shachihata Inc has only issued 500 of the stamps, which come with a clip and light, are pictured, and changes are made after customers have given feedback

Hundreds of people responded with some saying that this was too extreme and could lead to criminal action against her, but others said it would be a strong deterrent to tackle Japan's grim problem.

In May of this year, a video appeared of a pair of Japanese schoolgirls chasing a suspected groper on a platform at the station.

Video taken from the platform at Akabane Station in Tokyo showed the man who avoided commuters while attempting to flee before another man persuades him.

A 2001 study found that two-thirds of high school students in Tokyo were groped on trains.

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