Advertisements
Photo courtesy of the Australian Antarctic Division shows a loose tooth on the Amery Ice Shelf in East Antarctica

Large cities can be decimated by rising sea levels, with millions of displaced people before the end of the century, scientists warn.

Advertisements

The water level could rise by 11 feet by the end of the century, according to estimates based on a comparable warm-up period of 125,000 years ago.

Scientists are studying new data from the & # 39; latest interglacial & # 39 ;, a period of high sea levels and low global ice levels, and believe they can predict the speed that the next global warming will cause.

During the & # 39; last interglacial & # 39; the temperatures on earth were only one degree warmer than now.

The melting of the ice caps in Antarctica caused sea levels to rise rapidly – around 100 meters every 100 years.

Photo courtesy of the Australian Antarctic Division shows a loose tooth on the Amery Ice Shelf in East Antarctica

Photo courtesy of the Australian Antarctic Division shows a loose tooth on the Amery Ice Shelf in East Antarctica

Advertisements

This went on for centuries, up to about 36 feet (11 meters) higher than the current levels, with swaths of land covered with water.

Scientists from the Australian National University studied fossilized corals and ancient sediments from the Red Sea to analyze the speed at which the last & # 39; global warming & # 39; took place.

Although the & # 39; last interglacial & # 39; While warming was a naturally occurring phenomenon, the scientists are now experiencing global warming.

Lead author, professor Eelco Rohling, said the last interglacial sea rise was due to natural climate instability.

Professor Rohling said: & # 39; These were smaller and slower than today's man-made climate disruption.

& # 39; Our research clearly shows that Antarctica, long thought a sleeping giant when it comes to sea level rise, is in fact the most important player.

& # 39; And it seems that it can change in large quantities on time scales that are highly relevant to society and in ways that would have profound consequences for human infrastructure. & # 39;

Copernicus Support Office has released this image of the D83 iceberg descending from the Amery ice shelf in Antarctica, September 20, 2019
Advertisements

Copernicus Support Office has released this image of the D83 iceberg descending from the Amery ice shelf in Antarctica, September 20, 2019

Copernicus Support Office has released this image of the D83 iceberg descending from the Amery ice shelf in Antarctica, September 20, 2019

The iceberg of the D83 has a size of approximately 1,582 square kilometers. Amery is the third largest ice plateau in Antarctica

The study shows for the first time how much ice loss at the last interglacial occurred for the first time in Antarctica, followed by Greenland.

WHAT ARE INTERGLACIAL PERIODS?

Advertisements

Long warm periods in the history of our planet, when the temperatures were comparable to the world today.

Known as interglacial periods, these warm phases have occurred sporadically over the past 450,000 years.

Three of the best documented warm periods in particular: the thermal maximum of the Holocene (5000-9000 years ago), the last glacial (129,000-116,000 years ago) and the warm period of mid-Pliocene (3.3-3 million years) ago).

The warming of the first two periods was caused by predictable changes in the Earth's orbit, but the event in the Middle Pliocene would have been the result of concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that were 350 – 450 ppm – about the same as today.

Scientists warn that the effects of man-made global warming may be more disastrous, since it is currently warming both poles at the same rate.

Advertisements

If the ice caps of both Greenland and Antarctica were to melt completely, this would see a devastating rise of 200 feet in water level.

Co-author, Dr. Fiona Hibbert, said that with the current greenhouse-gas-driven climate change in both polar regions, there is rapid warming of the atmosphere and the ocean simultaneously.

Dr. Hibbert said: & # 39; This causes simultaneous loss of ice in Antarctica and Greenland.

& # 39; But the most important thing to remember is that today's climate disruption is greater and is developing faster than that of the last interglacial.

& # 39; As a result, sea level rises may develop over the coming centuries that are even higher than those for the interglacial that we have studied. & # 39;

Advertisements

The study was jointly led by Professor Rohling and Dr. Hibbert from ANU, with colleagues from Australia, Norway, Spain, the United States and Germany. It was published in Nature Communications.

Crabeater seals resting on the ice floe in Antarctica. The Western Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most biologically important areas of the Southern Ocean and has experienced the effects of climate change more than almost everywhere on Earth

Crabeater seals resting on the ice floe in Antarctica. The Western Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most biologically important areas of the Southern Ocean and has experienced the effects of climate change more than almost everywhere on Earth

Crabeater seals resting on the ice floe in Antarctica. The Western Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most biologically important areas of the Southern Ocean and has experienced the effects of climate change more than almost everywhere on Earth

It follows the publication of a paper signed by 11,000 from & # 39; the world's greatest scientists who declare that & # 39; immeasurable human suffering & # 39; is inevitable without profound and lasting changes in human activities.

The newspaper explained the climate emergency before offering a series of effective actions that people could take.

To limit the damage caused by greenhouse gas emissions from humans, the paper requires more control over the booming world population, which is currently increasing by more than 200,000 people a day.

The addition of population control should be approached with methods that ensure social and economic justice to maintain a morally and ecologically responsible world.

WHAT STEPS CAN WE TAKE TO LIMIT CLIMATE CHANGE?

The article pointed to six areas in which humanity should take immediate steps to delay the effects of a warming planet.

Steps detailed in the article written by William J. Ripple professor of ecology at Oregon State University and researcher Christopher Wolf.

1) Replace fossil fuels with low-carbon renewable energy sources

Advertisements

2) Quickly reduce the emissions of methane, soot, hydrofluorocarbons and other short-lived climate pollutants

3) Restore and protect ecosystems so that they can convert CO2 emissions naturally

4) Shift & # 39; the world's plant-based diet and food waste reduction

5) Seconomic goals to preserve the biosphere – not the acquisition of wealth

6) Stabilize the world's population

Advertisements

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) sciencetech (t) Climate change and global warming