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Amazing moment, a British Paralympic swimmer takes his first steps with a robotic exoskeleton

Amazing moment, a British Paralympic swimmer with cerebral palsy gets up and takes his first steps with a robotic exoskeleton

  • Grace Harvey, 21, tested the robotic suit made at Suzuka University in Japan
  • The swimmer is the British number one on the back of 100 meters (328 feet)
  • The images show Mrs. Harvey smiling as she takes her first tentative steps forward
  • Paralympic Suzanna Hext also entered the suit for the first time since 2012

Incredible images show the moment when a British Paralympic swimmer with cerebral palsy gets up and takes his first steps with a robotic exoskeleton.

Grace Harvey, 21, was able to take a special walk with the help of the most advanced technology developed in Japan, giving her a day she will never forget.

In the video, Ware’s swimmer, Hertfordshire, smiled nervously as she took her “first” tentative steps.

She laughed when a spectator said, “You’re running, Grace.”

Swimmer Harvey holds the European record for the Individual Medley of 200 meters (656 feet) and is currently the British number one in the 100 meters (328 feet) back event.

He is currently training in the city of Suzuka, Japan, before the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games in August.

As part of his trip, he was given the opportunity to try a robotic suit at Suzuka University, which allowed him to “walk.”

Harvey, who has cerebral palsy and began swimming as part of his physiotherapy, posted a video of the “incredible” experience on Twitter.

In the images, the Paralympic can be seen wearing the robotic suit that was tied around her waist, while hooked on a walking frame that she uses to stabilize while taking steps forward.

‘For the first time. I got straight. For the first time. I walked with a normal walking pattern, ” Harvey wrote on Twitter.

“I can’t thank @britishswimming and Suzuka University enough for the most amazing experience.”

“Technology creates possibilities, it gave me a day I will never forget.”

Incredible images show the moment when a British Paralympic swimmer with cerebral palsy gets up and takes his first steps with a robotic exoskeleton.

Incredible images show the moment when a British Paralympic swimmer with cerebral palsy gets up and takes his first steps with a robotic exoskeleton.

Incredible images show the moment when a British Paralympic swimmer with cerebral palsy gets up and takes his first steps with a robotic exoskeleton.

Incredible images show the moment when a British Paralympic swimmer with cerebral palsy gets up and takes his first steps with a robotic exoskeleton

Grace Harvey, 21, was able to take a special walk with the help of state-of-the-art technology developed in Japan, giving her a day she will never forget.

Grace Harvey, 21, was able to take a special walk with the help of state-of-the-art technology developed in Japan, giving her a day she will never forget.

Grace Harvey, 21, was able to take a special walk with the help of state-of-the-art technology developed in Japan, giving her a day she will never forget.

Harvey was not the only Paralympic athlete who received the change to use the device, and dual athlete Suzanna Hext posted a similar video on social media.

“I WALKED … the moment you pinch yourself again, when you realize that you walked for the first time since your life changed the spinal cord injury in 2012,” he wrote on Twitter.

‘Many thanks to Suzuka medical uni, cyberdyne, @britishswimming and @Connectwjapan for making this possible. A dream come true…’

Ms. Harvey was not the only Paralympic athlete given the change to use the device, with dual athlete Suzanna Hext posting a similar video on social media

Ms. Harvey was not the only Paralympic athlete given the change to use the device, with dual athlete Suzanna Hext posting a similar video on social media

Ms. Harvey was not the only Paralympic athlete who received the change to use the device, and dual athlete Suzanna Hext posted a similar video on social media.

“I WALKED … the moment you pinch yourself again, when you realize that you walked for the first time since your life changed the spinal cord injury in 2012,” Ms. Hext wrote on Twitter.

What is an exoskeleton?

Exoskeletons are portable devices that work in conjunction with the user.

Exoskeletons are placed in the user’s body and act as amplifiers that increase, reinforce or restore human performance.

The opposite would be a mechanical prosthesis, such as an arm or a robotic leg that replaces the original part of the body.

The exoskeletons can be made of rigid materials such as metal or carbon fiber, or they can be made entirely of soft and elastic parts.

Exoskeletons can be fed and equipped with sensors and actuators, or they can be completely passive.

The exoskeletons can be mobile or fixed / suspended and can cover the entire body, only the upper or lower extremities, or even a specific segment of the body, such as the ankle or the hip.

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