Amateur metal detector discovers an 18-carat gold ring from 1834

An amateur metal detector who tripped over an 1834 gold ring plans to reunite it with the owner’s niece.

The 18-carat band is inscribed with the name of Elizabeth Honywood and her date of death on September 29, 1834.

It is believed that the ring was made by her husband, Thomas Honywood, who bought the ring after the death of her beloved wife.

It is believed that he had the ring designed as an accessory that adheres to his cane so that the memory of his fiance is at his side at all times.

The emotional ring was found by amateur Geoff Smith, 51, at Lancing Beach, who was touring the area at night with his lighthouse.

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The 18-carat band is inscribed with the name Elizabeth Honywood and her date of death on September 29, 1834, as well as the appropriate badges.

The 18-carat band is inscribed with the name Elizabeth Honywood and her date of death on September 29, 1834, as well as the appropriate badges.

It is believed that the ring was made by Elizabeth Honywood's husband, Thomas Honywood, who bought the ring after the death of his beloved wife. It is believed that he had the ring designed as an accessory that adheres to his cane.

It is believed that the ring was made by Elizabeth Honywood's husband, Thomas Honywood, who bought the ring after the death of his beloved wife. It is believed that he had the ring designed as an accessory that adheres to his cane.

It is believed that the ring was made by Elizabeth Honywood’s husband, Thomas Honywood, who bought the ring after the death of his beloved wife. It is believed that he had the ring designed as an accessory that adheres to his cane.

The ring was found by the amateur Geoff Smith (pictured) who toured the area at night with his lighthouse

The ring was found by the amateur Geoff Smith (pictured) who toured the area at night with his lighthouse

The ring was found by the amateur Geoff Smith (pictured) who toured the area at night with his lighthouse

Smith has been using his metal detector as a hobby since 2015 and says he found the ring during the dark several weeks ago.

It seems that the golden ring formed on a top that can be adjusted to a cane.

But after closer inspection, Liz Honywood and the date – September 29, 1834 – were still deeply engraved in gold.

Mr. Smith, who lives near the beach, said: ‘I was coming out of the sand.

‘I saw it with my lighthouse since it was dark. At first I thought it was the lower end of a light bulb, since it is a commemorative ring that has been remodeled to be placed on the end of a cane or something.

‘It is 18K gold and was made in 1834. Inside the ring you have all the hallmarks. I was amazed. ‘

Smith turned to his local community through Facebook to get help identifying the original owners.

One member discovered that Elizabeth Morth had married Thomas Honywood in 1810 in Horsham, West Sussex.

The ring was found in the stones of Lancing Beach (pictured). There are plans underway to reunite the ring with the niece of the great owner.

The ring was found in the stones of Lancing Beach (pictured). There are plans underway to reunite the ring with the niece of the great owner.

The ring was found in the stones of Lancing Beach (pictured). There are plans underway to reunite the ring with the niece of the great owner.

It seems that the gold ring became a cap that can be adjusted to a cane and was made after the death of Elizabeth Honywood

It seems that the gold ring became a cap that can be adjusted to a cane and was made after the death of Elizabeth Honywood

It seems that the gold ring became a cap that can be adjusted to a cane and was made after the death of Elizabeth Honywood

The Honyrood couple had no children and she died in 1834, the same year the ring was made in Sheffield. Smith speculates that the ring may have been made after his death to appreciate his memory

The Honyrood couple had no children and she died in 1834, the same year the ring was made in Sheffield. Smith speculates that the ring may have been made after his death to appreciate his memory

The Honyrood couple had no children and she died in 1834, the same year the ring was made in Sheffield. Smith speculates that the ring may have been made after his death to appreciate his memory

They had no children and she died in 1834, the same year the ring was made in Sheffield.

Smith speculates that the ring may have been made after his death to appreciate his memory.

Further investigation revealed the entire Honywood family tree and revealed that some descendants still lived locally.

Liz Honywood had two sisters, one of whom was Anna Morth, born in 1875, who married George Simpkin on March 1, 1819.

Unlike her sister, Anna had children and found a direct descendant of her, Vivian Garner, who lived in the same city but died in 2013.

However, his three grandchildren, Alexina, Stephen and Emmi, are still alive.

Mr. Smith and Alexina, the great, great, great niece of Elizabeth Honywood, will meet to return the family heirloom to their rightful owners.

Mr. Smith said: ‘I was surprised when I found the ring, but I always return anything that is returnable.

“And when you have the name written on it, you have to make the effort to return it.”

HOW DO METAL DETECTORS WORK?

The invention of the metal detector cannot be truly claimed by a person.

It is a combination and fusion of several different technological pieces.

Alexander Graham Bell created a device that was an electromagnetic metal locating machine.

This was based on a device invented by physicist Heinrich Wilhelm Dove.

Some time later, an engineer Gerhard Fischer filed a patent regarding a design.

A metal detector consists of a stabilizer, control box, axis and search coil.

It is the two coils that are responsible for metal detection.

The external coil is the transmitter coil, while the internal coil is the receiver coil.

This works to detect and amplify frequencies. This type of technology is known as very low frequency technology or VLF.

When electricity is provided to this transmitter coil, a magnetic field is created around the coil.

This is the same science behind electromagnets.

When the machine floats on the metal, the electrons in the metal, due to their metallic bond and the sea of ​​electrons surrounding a fixed mass with positive charge, are affected by the magnetic field.

The change in electrons triggers a small electric field in the metallic object that alters the frequency of the metal detector.

This indicates that metal is present.

More advanced metal detectors can also differentiate between different types of metals and the change in frequency is different and, therefore, the pitch of the note is altered.

Source: The detective

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