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Backlash: Australian supermodel Adut Akech, born in Sudan, has been criticized online for controversy over Who magazine's photo mix
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Australian supermodel Adut Akech, who was born in Sudanese, was mistaken this week for another black model by Who Magazine, which led to a racial controversy.

While Adut, 19, publicly claimed that the blunder & # 39; did not respect her entire race & # 39 ;, the reception was mixed online, with many the incident & # 39; an innocent error & # 39; called.

The Instagram page of the model has been flooded in recent days with reactions from polarized people.

Backlash: Australian supermodel Adut Akech, born in Sudan, has been criticized online for controversy over Who magazine's photo mix

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Backlash: Australian supermodel Adut Akech, born in Sudan, has been criticized online for controversy over Who magazine's photo mix

& # 39; An innocent error & # 39 ;, someone said. & # 39; It was not a racist intention. You have gone too far. & # 39;

Another wrote: & # 39; Although I understand that you are upset in these circumstances, I am sure it is a mistake that had nothing to do with your ethnicity, culture, background or any maliciousness toward you. & # 39;

& # 39; Racism means showing prejudice or discrimination against another race because of feelings of superiority & # 39 ;, another explained.

& # 39; This situation is a human error that confuses one model with another that looks the same. They have exactly the same hairstyle and the same hair color. This error is not racist. Get a grip! & # 39;

& # 39; Although I understand that you are upset in these circumstances, I am sure it is a mistake that has nothing to do with your ethnicity, culture, background or any maliciousness towards you & # 39 ;, wrote one
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& # 39; Although I understand that you are upset in these circumstances, I am sure it is a mistake that has nothing to do with your ethnicity, culture, background or any maliciousness towards you & # 39 ;, wrote one

& # 39; Although I understand that you are upset in these circumstances, I am sure it is a mistake that has nothing to do with your ethnicity, culture, background or any maliciousness towards you & # 39 ;, wrote one

& # 39; Racism means showing prejudice or discrimination against another race because of feelings of superiority & # 39 ;, another explained

& # 39; Racism means showing prejudice or discrimination against another race because of feelings of superiority & # 39 ;, another explained

& # 39; Racism means showing prejudice or discrimination against another race because of feelings of superiority & # 39 ;, another explained

While Adut, 19, publicly claimed that the blunder & # 39; did not respect her entire race & # 39 ;, the reception was mixed online, with many the incident & # 39; an innocent error & # 39; called

While Adut, 19, publicly claimed that the blunder & # 39; did not respect her entire race & # 39 ;, the reception was mixed online, with many the incident & # 39; an innocent error & # 39; called

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While Adut, 19, publicly claimed that the blunder & # 39; did not respect her entire race & # 39 ;, the reception was mixed online, with many the incident & # 39; an innocent error & # 39; called

The backlash comes after Kerri-Anne Kennerley defended the magazine Who about the uncomfortable mix-up – comparing it to editors who confuse her with 60-minute star Liz Hayes.

The magazine was criticized for publishing an in-depth interview with model Akech born in South Sudan – alongside a photo of model Flavia Lazarus, who is also black.

While the magazine blamed an administrative error for publishing the wrong photos on Friday, Akech said the error is an example of racism in Australia, and said the same error would not have happened with a white model.

But Kennerley did not agree with Akech and said Tuesday in Studio 10 that it was a simple mistake and had nothing to do with racism.

The case is due to an administrative error, while Akech has labeled the magazine racially and said it would not have happened with a white model
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The case is due to an administrative error, while Akech has labeled the magazine racially and said it would not have happened with a white model

The case is due to an administrative error, while Akech has labeled the magazine racially and said it would not have happened with a white model

& # 39; I just think she (Akech) is going too far if she thinks it's all about racism … someone just made a mistake, & # 39; she said.

Kennerley admitted that although the error was a & # 39; major error & # 39; could be seen, she was mistaken in different magazines in different magazines for 60 minutes journalist Liz Hayes.

Studio B co-host Angela Bishop was quick to challenge Kennerley if the two mix-ups could be compared.

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& # 39; Was yours in just a social page snap, unlike an entire article about Adut, in which she told about her success, that she is the face of Melbourne Fashion Week and currently the most popular model in the world? & # 39;

WHO IS ADUT AKECH?

Adut Akech is a 19-year-old supermodel who grew up in a refugee camp in Kenya before moving to Adelaide with her family.

She was initially scouted by modeling agencies as a 13-year-old, but only started her career at the age of 16 when she joined prestigious Chadwick Models in Australia.

Her career rocketed from there.

She has collaborated with some of the largest brands in the industry, including Saint Laurent, Valentino, Calvin Klein and Tom Ford.

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She is now the ambassador of Melbourne Fashion Week 2019.

Akech has modeled for some of the largest brands in the world, including Prada, Miu Miu, Tom Ford and Valentino.

She also recently appeared on the prestigious September cover of British Vogue, guest edited by the Duchess of Sussex, Meghan Markle.

Her interview with the magazine Who was about diversity and acceptance in the fashion industry and elaborated on Akech & # 39; s vision on accepting refugees.

She spoke of problems that were dear to her, born in South Sudan and raised in a Kenyan refugee camp before she and her family moved to Adelaide, where she said the mix was all the more difficult to handle.

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Bishop doubted whether a mix of photos could be apologized, given the scale of the article.

& # 39; If it's a photo of a social page, I can make that happen. But if you do the article specifically about this person, specifically about her performance … & # 39;

A firm Kennerley insisted that it was an innocent mistake that could not be reasonably attached to the journalist.

She said it was the sub-editor or artistic director's job to ensure that the photo fitted on the page and that they might not have read the article to make sure the correct photo was used.

The magazine was dragged over the coal after it published an interview with the South-born model Adut Akech alongside a photo of model Flavia Lazarus

The magazine was dragged over the coal after it published an interview with the South-born model Adut Akech alongside a photo of model Flavia Lazarus

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The magazine was dragged over the coal after it published an interview with the South-born model Adut Akech alongside a photo of model Flavia Lazarus

An image of Flavia Lazarus (photo) was used incorrectly in a play about Adut Akech

An image of Flavia Lazarus (photo) was used incorrectly in a play about Adut Akech

An image of Flavia Lazarus (photo) was used incorrectly in a play about Adut Akech

Kennerley spoke to Studio 10 on Tuesday to say she believed it was a simple mistake and had nothing to do with racism

Kennerley spoke to Studio 10 on Tuesday to say she believed it was a simple mistake and had nothing to do with racism

Kennerley spoke to Studio 10 on Tuesday to say she believed it was a simple mistake and had nothing to do with racism

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Host Joe Hildebrand even came in to support the view and said he did not agree that the photo was an attack on the entire culture.

& # 39; To me, it is a bit like the fact that Cate Blanchett is trying to catch the cameraman who is taking a shot at her dress and saying how dare you, you sexist. & # 39;

A clearly fed up bishop said she didn't equate it & # 39; while she tried to talk about Hildebrand and Kennerley.

& # 39; If you tell a story about her, it is important to get the photo right. & # 39;

Model Flavia Lazarus was actually depicted

Model Flavia Lazarus was actually depicted

Supermodel Adut Akech spoke about her disappointment about the blunder
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Supermodel Adut Akech spoke about her disappointment about the blunder

Model Flavia Lazarus (left) was published in the magazine when they intended to share photos of Adut Akech (right) they interviewed

Liz Hayes (left) and Tara Brown (right) participate in the 2019 Nine Upfronts until 2018 in Sydney

Liz Hayes (left) and Tara Brown (right) participate in the 2019 Nine Upfronts until 2018 in Sydney

Liz Hayes (left) and Tara Brown (right) participate in the 2019 Nine Upfronts until 2018 in Sydney

The verbal stoush appears on the screen after Akech closed the magazine and called it out for racism, saying that the jungle would not have happened with a white model.

& # 39; It's racist, but of course I know it wasn't intentional & # 39 ;, Akech said Daily telegram. & # 39; It was an error. & # 39;

& # 39; But it does happen … you would not confuse the names of two white models or use another white girl.

The accident was due to an administrative error, where PR agency OPR said it had sent the wrong image to Who.

& # 39; The error was administrative and unintended and we sincerely apologize for this error and any upset it may have caused for the models involved and our customer, the city of Melbourne, & # 39; OPR said in a statement.

Akech said it was & # 39; not the first time I came across a racist incident in Victoria & # 39; on ABC radio.

To today, she said the blunder illustrated how & # 39; large & # 39; was a problem racism in Australia.

& # 39; The entire industry is improving, but there is still a long way to go and I think Australia is lagging far behind.

& # 39; When I saw it, I immediately felt so many emotions at the same time. I didn't feel respected, I felt hurt, you know, I felt angry. & # 39;

Strong women: Adut (top left) was one of the 14 women who appeared on the cover of British Vogue & # 39; s prestigious September edition, guest edited by Meghan Markle

Strong women: Adut (top left) was one of the 14 women who appeared on the cover of British Vogue & # 39; s prestigious September edition, guest edited by Meghan Markle

Strong women: Adut (top left) was one of the 14 women who appeared on the cover of British Vogue & # 39; s prestigious September edition, guest edited by Meghan Markle

The verbal stoush appears on the screen after Akech closed the magazine and called it out for racism, saying that the jungle would not have happened with a white model

The verbal stoush appears on the screen after Akech closed the magazine and called it out for racism, saying that the jungle would not have happened with a white model

The verbal stoush appears on the screen after Akech closed the magazine and called it out for racism, saying that the jungle would not have happened with a white model

Although Akech spoke and said today that the blunder illustrated how & # 39; great & # 39; was a problem racism in Australia

Although Akech spoke and said today that the blunder illustrated how & # 39; great & # 39; was a problem racism in Australia

Although Akech spoke and said today that the blunder illustrated how & # 39; great & # 39; was a problem racism in Australia

FOLLOW THE FULL STATEMENT FROM AKECH

& # 39; Over the past few days, I have been thinking deeply about how to handle this situation that does not suit me.

& # 39; For those who don't know, last week

& # 39; Who Magazine (Australia) has published an article about me. In the interview I spoke about how people view the attitude of refugees and people towards color in general.

& # 39; With the article, they published a large photo that said it was me. But it was from another black girl.

& # 39; This has upset me, has made me angry, it has given me a huge disrespect, and is unacceptable and unforgivable to me in all circumstances.

& # 39; Not only do I feel personally offended and not respected, but I also feel that my entire race has not been respected, so I think it is important that I address this issue.

& # 39; The person who clearly did this was the thought I was in that photo and that's not okay. This is very important because of what I was talking about in my interview.

& # 39; As a result of this event, I feel it has defeated the goal I stand for and what I was talking about. It shows that people are very ignorant and narrow-minded that they think that every black girl or African people looks the same.

& # 39; I feel that this would not have happened with a white model. My goal for this post is not to bash Who Magazine – they immediately apologized to me – but I feel like I need to publicly express how I feel.

& # 39; This has touched me deeply and we must start an important conversation that must take place. I am sure I am not the first person to have experienced this and that it must stop.

& # 39; I have been given the name of other models that happen to be of the same ethnicity, I find it very ignorant, rude and disrespectful of the both of us because we know this doesn't happen with white models.

& # 39; I want this to be a bit of a wake-up call for people in the industry, it's not OK and you have to do better.

& # 39; Large publications must ensure that they check things before they are published, especially if they are real stories and interviews and not just some rumors.

& # 39; For those who work at shows and shoots, it's important that you don't swap model names.

& # 39; Australia, you have a lot of work to do and you have to do better and that goes to the rest of the industry. & # 39;

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