A lunar photobomb: the NASA spacecraft captures the moment when the moon eclipses the sun TWICE in just six hours

<pre><pre>A lunar photobomb: the NASA spacecraft captures the moment when the moon eclipses the sun TWICE in just six hours

The mission of Parker Solar Probe will require 55 times more energy than would be needed to reach Mars, according to NASA.

It was launched on a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy lute, one of the most powerful rockets in the world, with a third stage attached.

But its trajectory and speed are fundamental to reach the correct orbit.

Since the Earth, and everything in it, is traveling at approximately 67,000 miles per hour in a direction lateral to the sun, the ship must be thrown back to cancel lateral movement, explains NASA.

The Parker probe goes beyond the sun, so it will have to eliminate about 53,000 miles per hour, according to the space agency.

Parker Solar Probe will swing around Venus a total of seven times, with each step slowing it down a bit and bringing it closer and closer to the sun. These orbits are shown in the animation above

This will require a boost from the powerful Delta IV rocket, and several Venus gravity aids to stop it.

The probe will depend on a series of Venus gravity aids to slow its lateral movement, allowing it to be only 3.8 million miles from the surface of the sun.

"In this case, instead of accelerating the spacecraft, as in a typical gravitational assistance, Venus reduces the speed of its lateral movement so that the ship can approach the sun," explains NASA.

"When it finally approaches, Parker Solar Probe will have lost much of its lateral speed, but it has gained great speed thanks to the sun's gravity.

& # 39; Parker Solar Probe will rush past the sun at 430,000 miles per hour & # 39;

At its closest point, it will be 3.8 million miles from the surface of the sun, becoming the only spacecraft to venture so close.

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