46-year-old fraudster convicted of falsifying police documents to help speeding drivers evade justice

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46-year-old fraudster convicted of falsifying police documents to help speeding drivers evade justice

  • Hamid Alhendi, 46, from Barnet, falsified the paperwork of nearly 300 speeding drivers caught by cameras so they were never identified by the police
  • Police discovered a scam when a large number of tickets related to one address
  • Force raided Alhendi’s home and business address and found evidence of fraud
  • Alhendi was sentenced to five years in prison after being found guilty last week on one charge of disrupting justice and five times of fraud at Harrow Crown Court.

A fraudster has been jailed for helping speeding drivers avoid prosecution by falsifying police documents.

Hamid Alhendi, 46, of Barnet, was jailed for a total of five years for one trial and five fraud at Harrow Crown Court.

Detectives from the Metropolitan Police Roads and Transport Policing Command [RTPC]in partnership with Transport for London, ended the illegal operation following a raid on Alhendi’s home and business.

For a fee, Alhendi offered a service to help those caught by traffic cameras evade prosecution and avoid fines and demerit points on their driver’s licenses.

The 46-year-old falsified the Prosecution’s letters sent to the owners of speeding vehicles to be returned with the details of the offending drivers.

Violators were usually local to Alhendi, who worked with an employee who declined to name the Met, and were made aware of the service through word of mouth.

Hamid Alhendi

Egle Slizauskaite

Egle Slizauskaite

Hamid Alhendi (left) has been jailed for five years for his part in a scam that helped speeding drivers avoid prosecution by the police by forging documents. His wife Egle Slizauskaite (right) was given a suspended sentence after admitting justice had been undermined

When questioned by MailOnline, police said they cannot reveal further details about how the scam worked over fears it could be copied.

The pair also used their plan to avoid prosecution for traffic offenses they committed themselves and on one occasion this involved Alhendi’s wife, Egle Slizauskaite.

By the end of the investigation, the police had identified at least 293 cases where the Messages to the Prosecutor had been falsified.

In addition, Alhendi used multiple false identities to fraudulently open accounts with banks, building societies and other service providers as part of the scam.

Police became aware of the scam when they discovered a large number of notices of intended prosecution [NIPs] with regard to the address at Ealing Road, Wembley.

On February 1, 2018, the fraud came to an end following a raid by detectives from the Met’s Proactive Crime Team Roads and Transport Policing on the premises and the defendants’ homes.

Among the evidence found were cell phones with images of the counterfeit NIPs

Alhendi’s associate and wife were arrested while Alhendi was already in prison at the time for a separate offense.

Alhendi was sentenced to five years in prison at Harrow Crown Court (pictured) for his part in the illegal operation after admitting one perverting the course of justice and five times committing fraud.

Alhendi was sentenced to five years in prison at Harrow Crown Court (pictured) for his part in the illegal operation after admitting one perverting the course of justice and five times committing fraud.

Alhendi was sentenced to five years in prison at Harrow Crown Court (pictured) for his part in the illegal operation after admitting one perverting the course of justice and five times committing fraud.

Alhendi’s wife, Egle Slizauskaite, 38, of the same address, was sentenced to seven months in prison, 12 months probation, with three months of electronic surveillance for disruption of justice.

The employee was charged with identification fraud and released for disrupting the course of justice. During this time he fled the country but is still wanted for the crime.

Detective Isabel Peres, RTPC Proactive Crime Team said: “I am very happy with this result and that we have put an end to this illegal operation.

Alhendi’s fraudulent actions meant that drivers who committed dangerous driving violations went unpunished and unchecked.

‘For the safety of all road users, we need to know who insult motorists are.

By helping to keep dangerous motorists on the road, Alhendi’s scam could have had serious consequences for other walkers, cyclists and motorists.

“We will deal vigorously with such people and try to bring anyone who commits an offense to justice, as this sentence shows.”

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