& # 39; Don't say we didn't warn you! & # 39; China uses a codeword for WAR to threaten the US for rare earths

A Chinese state newspaper has warned the US not to underestimate the possibilities of Beijing with its raw materials for rare earth minerals during a trade war between the two countries.

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People & # 39; s Daily, the mouthpiece of the ruling Chinese Communist Party, showed serious consequences for the Trump government with the help of a diplomatic term usually reserved by Beijing to signal the start of an armed struggle.

& # 39; Don't say we didn't warn you! & # 39; The newspaper said in a comment today because it commented on the possibility that China is suspending its exports of rare earth metals to the US.

China is considering a ban on exporting rare earths to the United States, which could go beyond the cost of everything from LED light bulbs to telephones. Shown are samples of rare earth minerals (from left) Cerium oxide, Bastnasite, Neodymium oxide and Lanthanum carbonate

China is considering a ban on exporting rare earths to the United States, which could go beyond the cost of everything from LED light bulbs to telephones. Shown are samples of rare earth minerals (from left) Cerium oxide, Bastnasite, Neodymium oxide and Lanthanum carbonate

China is by far the largest exporter of rare earth minerals in the world and produces more than 95 percent of the chemical elements used worldwide, or 120,000 tons per year

China is by far the largest exporter of rare earth minerals in the world and produces more than 95 percent of the chemical elements used worldwide, or 120,000 tons per year

China is by far the largest exporter of rare earth minerals in the world and produces more than 95 percent of the chemical elements used worldwide, or 120,000 tons per year

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The firm expression is often used by Chinese Communist Party leaders during or in the run-up to military conflicts.

It was famously used by Chairman Mao in 1949 during the Chinese Civil War when he warned his enemies to leave Beiping, now known as Beijing, and surrender to the Community Party.

It also appeared in People & # 39; s Daily columns in 1962 before China started a war with India over a disputed border region in the Himalayas and before the short Sino-Vietnamese war in 1979.

Last April, China & # 39; s Xinhua News Agency also used the phrase to keep Washington cautious after it announced plans to impose tariffs on around 1,300 Chinese products after an investigation into Chinese foreign trade policy.

& # 39; Anyone familiar with Chinese diplomacy would know the weight of this sentence & # 39 ;, a comment said at that time.

Increasing trade tensions have led to concerns that Beijing will use its dominant position as a supplier of rare earths as a lever in the trade war between the United States and China.

Trade war: Trump, who returned from Japan on Tuesday afternoon with the first lady Melania Trump, is confronted with a new threat from China in their escalating tensions

Trade war: Trump, who returned from Japan on Tuesday afternoon with the first lady Melania Trump, is confronted with a new threat from China in their escalating tensions

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Trade war: Trump, who returned from Japan on Tuesday afternoon with the first lady Melania Trump, is confronted with a new threat from China in their escalating tensions

President Xi Jinping visited a rare natural gas company in southern China last week, state media reported suspecting the producers' shares of speculation that Beijing was considering using the chemicals in the US trade war

President Xi Jinping visited a rare natural gas company in southern China last week, state media reported suspecting the producers' shares of speculation that Beijing was considering using the chemicals in the US trade war

President Xi Jinping visited a rare natural gas company in southern China last week, state media reported suspecting the producers' shares of speculation that Beijing was considering using the chemicals in the US trade war

Beijing is seriously considering & # 39; restricting the export to the United States of rare earths, 17 chemical elements used in high-tech consumer electronics and military equipment, said the editor-in-chief of China & # 39; s Global Times yesterday.

The last column in People's Daily hinted that China could use natural resources well to put pressure on Donald Trump during the trade war.

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Zeldzame Will rare-earth metals become China's counter-weapon against the unreasonably harsh US action? The answer is not in-depth, & it said.

The article then continued: & # 39; American companies have a particularly high demand for rare earth products.

& # 39; Some US people are actually fantasizing about obtaining resources independently, but it is undeniable that the US is highly dependent on the global supply chain. & # 39;

The newspaper also stressed that China would prioritize its domestic demand for rare earth elements, which it labeled as the & # 39; vitamin for industries & # 39 ;.

Growing tensions in trade have led to concerns that Beijing will use its dominant position as a supplier of rare earths for leverage. People & # 39; s Daily, the mouthpiece of the Communist Party of China, hinted today that a rare earth ban can occur if Washington refuses to relapse

Growing tensions in trade have led to concerns that Beijing will use its dominant position as a supplier of rare earths for leverage. People & # 39; s Daily, the mouthpiece of the Communist Party of China, hinted today that a rare earth ban can occur if Washington refuses to relapse

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Growing tensions in trade have led to concerns that Beijing will use its dominant position as a supplier of rare earths for leverage. People & # 39; s Daily, the mouthpiece of the Communist Party of China, hinted today that a rare earth ban can occur if Washington refuses to relapse

China has two important rare earth bases, Bayan Obo in the north and Ganzhou in the south

China has two important rare earth bases, Bayan Obo in the north and Ganzhou in the south

China has two important rare earth bases, Bayan Obo in the north and Ganzhou in the south

Zonder Undoubtedly, the US wants to use the products made with the rare earth metals imported from China to suppress China's development. The Chinese should not agree, & it went on.

Four years earlier, Japanese sources claimed that China temporarily halted exports to Japan in 2010, when a territorial row flared up among Asian rivals, indictments that Beijing denied.

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China is & # 39; the world's largest exporter of rare earths and produces more than 95 percent of the chemical elements used worldwide, or 120,000 tons per year.

It accounted for 80 percent of imports of rare earth metals between 2014 and 2017 by the United States, which excluded them from recent rates along with some other critical Chinese minerals.

However, from June 1, Beijing raised the rates on imports of rare earth ore into the US from 10 percent to 25 percent, making it less economical to process the material in China.

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