Zwemster accuses Swimming Australia of & # 39; OTHER cover-up & # 39;

Paralympic star accuses Swimming Australia of & # 39; OTHER cover-up & # 39; – claiming that athletes lied about their handicap to compete at the highest level

  • Former Australian dolphins Para swimmer claims that athletes lie about disabilities
  • The supposed practice of Ashleigh Cockburn was common before major competitions
  • Swimming in Australia is already being criticized for handling the Shayna Jack case
  • The 20-year-old swimmer is confronted with a four-year ban after a positive drug test
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Swimming in Australia has come under fire for the second time this week with an athlete who claims that participants have lied about their handicap in order to compete.

A former member of the Australian Dolphins Para swimming team, Ashleigh Cockburn, claimed that there is a culture of & # 39; intentional misrepresentation & # 39; expected from disabled competitors.

& # 39; As a former member of the team, I witnessed a deliberate misrepresentation that was not only accepted but expected & # 39 ;, Cockburn wrote for news.com.au.

A former member of the Australian Dolphins Para swimming team, Ashleigh Cockburn, has claimed that there is a culture of & # 39; intentional misrepresentation & # 39; is expected from disabled competitors

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A former member of the Australian Dolphins Para swimming team, Ashleigh Cockburn (photo right) claims that there is a culture of & # 39; misrepresentation & # 39; of disabled competitors

Swimming in Australia is already in hot water due to lack of transparency around swimmer Shayna Jack (photo) positive testing for a prohibited substance

Swimming in Australia is already in hot water due to lack of transparency around swimmer Shayna Jack (photo) positive testing for a prohibited substance

Swimming in Australia is already in hot water due to lack of transparency around swimmer Shayna Jack (photo) positive testing for a prohibited substance

& # 39; During my career, I heard athletes casually mentioning how they were thrown into the snow before classification, so their muscles and joints were much stiffer than normal.

& # 39; Others bound their limbs to limit flexibility, strength and fine motor skills or pushed themselves to physical exhaustion just before the test to reduce endurance and strength. & # 39;

The allegations are ahead of the Tokyo Paralympic Games in 2020 and athletes preparing for classification, a process that groups athletes with similar ability to compete against each other.

Another current Australian Paralympic swimmer, who did not want to be mentioned, claimed that such practices were common.

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She said there was frustration among legitimate athletes as they watched rivals claim medals, records, and scholarships.

A Swimming Australia spokesperson told the publication that they supported the current rating system – which is being done by an independent panel of medical professionals and rating experts.

Swimming in Australia is already in warm water due to a lack of transparency around swimmer Shayna Jack who tests positive for a prohibited substance.

The 20-year-old tested positive for Ligandrol in both her A and B samples prior to the FINA World Championships in South Korea.

Shayna Jack (photo on the right with her friend) faces a four-year ban unless she can prove that she did not intentionally take Ligandrol

Shayna Jack (photo on the right with her friend) faces a four-year ban unless she can prove that she did not intentionally take Ligandrol

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Shayna Jack (photo on the right with her friend) faces a four-year ban unless she can prove that she did not intentionally take Ligandrol

Ligandrol is an experimental drug that is used to build muscle mass.

Jack has been told by the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority on Tuesday that she will face a four-year ban unless she can prove that she is innocent.

Four years is the standard ban for swimmers caught on drugs classified as anabolic.

Earlier on the same day, she was banned from the International Swimming League while preparing to fight the doping case.

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Daily Mail Australia has contacted Swimming Australia for comments.

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