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A rock album about the strange world of bees has been recorded by a professor of zoology in an attempt to save the vital insects from extinction. In the photo the Killer Queen Bees, with zoologist Lars Chittka, center, and musicians Rob Alexander, left, and Katie Green, right
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A rock album about the strange world of bees has been recorded by a professor of zoology in an attempt to save the vital insects from extinction.

Each issue examines a different aspect of bee psychology, biology or history – from the moment NASA sent bees into space to the use of bees in commercial products.

All funds raised from the sale of the album & # 39; Strange Flowers & # 39; are donated to the Buglife charity, which is dedicated to the protection of bees and other insects.

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A rock album about the strange world of bees has been recorded by a professor of zoology in an attempt to save the vital insects from extinction. In the photo the Killer Queen Bees, with zoologist Lars Chittka, center, and musicians Rob Alexander, left, and Katie Green, right

A rock album about the strange world of bees has been recorded by a professor of zoology in an attempt to save the vital insects from extinction. In the photo the Killer Queen Bees, with zoologist Lars Chittka, center, and musicians Rob Alexander, left, and Katie Green, right

AN EXCERPT LYRICS FROM & # 39; I STUNG GWYNETH PALTROW & # 39;

& # 39;I died for your sins

So you can shine forever

Pierced for your violations

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Crushed for your iniquities

I gave you my greatest gift

The ultimate sacrifice

In the name of immortal beauty

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I took the fate that you are trying to dodge & # 39;

The band, Killer Queen Bees, consists of zoologist Lars Chittka from the Queen Mary University of London and musicians Katie Green and Rob Alexander.

Professor Chittka, who plays the electric guitar, is known for having taught bees to play football and to pull strings to receive food.

& # 39; Strange Flowers & # 39; becomes the band's debut album – and wants to bring the strange world of bees to life, with lyrics exploring the biology, life and psychology of bees.

& # 39; Instead of just & # 39; to explain dry facts & # 39; in my scientific writings, I have long noticed that there is a lot of poetry in the world of bees, so I decided to wrap them in lyrics, & # 39; said Professor Chittka.

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& # 39; It was important for me not to write sentimental texts about picturesque summer meadows and buzzing bees. & # 39;

& # 39; As I learn every day, as someone who studies the psychology of bees, the world of pollinators and flowers is full of manipulation and deception. & # 39;

Professor Chittka addresses this theme on their website.

& # 39; The first activity of a honeybee queen, after it is born from dolls, is to find and try to kill all of its sister queens, & # 39; he wrote.

& Nowhere else in the world are sex and death as closely linked as in the honeybee drone, which dies immediately after copulation because its penis is torn from the body. & # 39;

& # 39; Strange Flowers & # 39; becomes the debut album of Killer Queen Bee - with lyrics exploring the biology, life and psychology of bees (stock image)
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& # 39; Strange Flowers & # 39; becomes the debut album of Killer Queen Bee - with lyrics exploring the biology, life and psychology of bees (stock image)

& # 39; Strange Flowers & # 39; becomes the debut album of Killer Queen Bee – with lyrics exploring the biology, life and psychology of bees (stock image)

The band, Killer Queen Bees, consists of zoologist Lars Chittka of the Queen Mary University of London (center) and musicians Katie Green (right) and Rob Alexander (left)

The band, Killer Queen Bees, consists of zoologist Lars Chittka of the Queen Mary University of London (center) and musicians Katie Green (right) and Rob Alexander (left)

The band, Killer Queen Bees, consists of zoologist Lars Chittka of the Queen Mary University of London (center) and musicians Katie Green (right) and Rob Alexander (left)

One song, "Space Girls," tells the story of how NASA sent bees into space, while & # 39; Drone Wars & # 39; examines the role of male bees who lose their penises after mating.

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Meanwhile, & # 39; I Stung Gwyneth Paltrow & # 39; to the use of products based on bees, including the practice of being voluntarily put by bees in a so-called treatment for various ailments practiced by the famous actress.

& # 39; I hope the lyrics will draw attention to the fascinating biology of bees through this unconventional path, & # 39; said Professor Chittka.

STRANGE FLOWERS: TRACK LIST

1. California Gold

Investigates almond blooms in California, & # 39; the world's largest pollination event.

2. The beekeeper & # 39; s dream

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A beekeeper has a nightmare about how bees remember human faces.

3. Night shards

This track looks at how bees, such as humans, process memories & night.

4. Strange flowers

The meeting of bees and flowers evokes an impossible relationship.

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5. Drone Wars

Tells the fateful story of male bee drones, who die after mating.

6. Space girls

NASA sent bees into space in 1982 and 1984 – but what did they think?

7. I pricked Gwyneth Paltrow

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A bee sacrificed at the altar of the beauty of the actress plot revenge.

8. Dying Killthere Bee Queen

A queen bee murderer thinks about how she killed her competition.

9. The listening flower

Inspired by how some flowers can feel bees buzzing in the neighborhood.

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All funds raised from the sale of the album & # 39; Strange Flowers & # 39; are donated to the Buglife charity that works on the protection of bees and other insects

All funds raised from the sale of the album & # 39; Strange Flowers & # 39; are donated to the Buglife charity that works on the protection of bees and other insects

All funds raised from the sale of the album & # 39; Strange Flowers & # 39; are donated to the Buglife charity that works on the protection of bees and other insects

& # 39; It is often said that we must keep bees because we need them.

& # 39; That it is undoubtedly true – much of our food depends on bees as pollinators – but there are other reasons to ensure that they do not die out, & # 39; Professor Chittka added.

& # 39; They are fascinating creatures in themselves. The strangeness of their world has inspired generations of nature lovers, poets and writers. We owe the bees. & # 39;

Bees, Professor Chittka adds, have given us honey, candles and even co – one of the oldest alcoholic beverages known to mankind.

Professor Chittka, who plays the electric guitar, is known for having taught bees to play football and to pull strings to receive food

Professor Chittka, who plays the electric guitar, is known for having taught bees to play football and to pull strings to receive food

Professor Chittka, who plays the electric guitar, is known for having taught bees to play football and to pull strings to receive food

& # 39; Reports on the decline of bees and general insects from around the world are currently making grim reading & # 39 ;, said Paul Hetherington, Buglife Fundraising and Communications Director, Invertebrate Conservation.

& # 39; Current trends point to the extinction of multiple species in the next thirty years. & # 39;

& # 39; But perhaps we can now reverse the decline of bee populations with the right actions. Restoring connectivity with our landscapes and changing patterns of herbicide and pesticide use can make a difference together. & # 39;

& # 39; Instead of just & # 39; to explain dry facts & # 39; in my scientific writings, I have long noticed that there is a lot of poetry in the world of bees, & # 39; said Professor Chittka

& # 39; Instead of just & # 39; to explain dry facts & # 39; in my scientific writings, I have long noticed that there is a lot of poetry in the world of bees, & # 39; said Professor Chittka

& # 39; Instead of just & # 39; to explain dry facts & # 39; in my scientific writings, I have long noticed that there is a lot of poetry in the world of bees, & # 39; said Professor Chittka

Professor Chittka and the band have decided to donate 100 percent of the album's sales to Buglife.

The charity works to protect insects and their habitats, to bring endangered species back from the edge and to raise awareness of the vital role that insects play in our quality of life and the survival of the human species.

& # 39; By supporting the Killer Bee Queens, you not only get great music, but you also contribute to the change needed to save these essential species, & # 39; said Mr. Hetherington.

& # 39; Strange Flowers & # 39; can be purchased from Bandcamp.

WHAT IS THE HONEYBEE CRISIS?

According to Greenpeace, honey bees, both domestic and wild, are responsible for around 80 percent of global pollination.

But the bee colony collapses all over the world on their vital work.

Bees die from a combination of pesticides, habitat destruction, drought, nutritional deficiency, global warming and air pollution among other factors.

The global bee crisis may be resolved if dangerous pesticides are eliminated, wild habitats are preserved and ecological agriculture is restored, according to Greenpeace (photo of the stock)

The global bee crisis may be resolved if dangerous pesticides are eliminated, wild habitats are preserved and ecological agriculture is restored, according to Greenpeace (photo of the stock)

The global bee crisis may be resolved if dangerous pesticides are eliminated, wild habitats are preserved and ecological agriculture is restored, according to Greenpeace (photo of the stock)

Greenpeace has reported: & # 39; Basically, we know that people are largely responsible for the two most prominent causes: pesticides and habitat loss. & # 39;

This is important for a number of reasons, including the amount of worker bees we put into our food production.

Bees pollinate vegetables, nuts and fruit. Of the best human food crops, no fewer than 70 out of 100 are pollinated by the creatures, which account for no less than 90 percent of global food.

Greenpeace has proposed the following solutions to the problem:

  • The conservation of wild habitats to protect the health of pollinators
  • The restoration of ecological agriculture
  • The elimination of & # 39; the world's most dangerous pesticides

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