YouTube investigates legal anthropom Steven Crowder for harassing the Vox.com host

A tweet thread from Vox host Carlos Maza different authorities of the right-wing YouTube commentator Steven Crowder who makes homophobic and racist comments about him, has initiated a YouTube investigation, the company has confirmed that The edge.

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It is Maza host of Vox"S strike out series – a show about media, politics and technology. (Disclosure: Vox is a publication of Vox Media, which is also the owner The edge.) strike out often the attention of Crowder, who has published "refutations" in the videos. But as Maza & # 39; s video report on Twitter clearly shows, Crowder video & # 39; s routinely contain blatant violations of YouTube's policy against cyberbullying, including repeatedly referring to Maza as an "anchor baby, a lispy stranger," and ) a Mexican, "in addition to other derogatory terms. Maza says Crowder's hateful comment has led to "a wall of homophobic (and) racist abuse on Instagram and Twitter" from Crowder fans.

YouTube Community Guidelines that content & # 39; intentionally posted to humiliate someone, to make hurtful and negative personal comments / videos & about 39 about another person, or to encourage others to harass or threaten individuals on YouTube or outside YouTube & # 39; is forbidden. More than a year ago, YouTube also promised to tackle hate speech and harmful content.

But YouTube has been slow to trade. Despite the fact that several videos were flagged over the course of months, it didn't take until Maza & # 39; s viral tweet thread was on YouTube last night to talk for the first time. The YouTube team told him they were grateful for his help and would investigate Crowder & # 39; s highlighted video & # 39; s.

In the meantime, Crowder does published his own video in response to Maza's thread, defending his series as a political comedy and denying any form of doxxing attacks that his viewers would undertake. Although it clearly violates YouTube's cyberbullying policy, Crowder claims that Vox tries to end his channel. The edge Has approached Crowder for comment, but has not heard at the time of publication.

"By refusing to enforce his policy against harassment, YouTube is helping to organize incredibly powerful cyberbullying and targeting people they disagree with," tweeted Maza.

This is not new to Maza. He has been dealing with Crowder since 2017, when the YouTube creator first started "debunking" strike out episodes. Crowder has been using homophobic and racist language in video & # 39; s about Maza since the beginning, but Maza told The edge it was only in the fall that he began to feel the seriousness of Crowder's videos. Maza was shopping when he received a call from an unlisted number. The voice on the other hand asked his name and then took a break that Maza described as disturbing. Before the caller could finish his question ("Why do you hate …"), Maza hung up scared.

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He couldn't even handle the call before more than a hundred text messages were spamming his phone, all with the same message: "debate steer crowder." "I just started blocking numbers," Maza said. The edge. "But my phone was basically unusable because it kept blowing."

"Even when I write scripts now, it is almost as if I think about my shoulder and think:" Is there a way to write this that prevents me from coming back for this? "," Said Maza. "This is how I used to act in high school when I was brutally harassed because I was gay. I still look over my shoulder constantly."

But Maza doesn't blame Crowder. There will always be bullies, he said. The only difference between high school bullies and YouTube, he argued, is that a teacher or a teacher takes the step and takes the bully out of the comparison completely. They realize that "one side is the aggressor, that is unacceptable and they enforce effective punishment for the bully," Maza said.

YouTube has previously said that eliminating hateful and harmful content is the first priority. But Maza sees no action against that goal. "It's YouTube's fault," Maza says, "because they created a rule and realized that it was too risky to force them, and to show me my humiliation in the place of publicly to interest YouTube. They know better. "

"There is no algorithm that will fix this," he said. "The only thing that will solve this is smart people who say: & # 39; We know this is what people want, and we will not give it to them. We are going to close it because it destroys the entire community when we let people benefit from bullying. I wish they had the courage to recognize it and act accordingly. "

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