YouTube faces the climate change deniers

YouTube is fighting against the climate change deniers by implementing a fact check box below the videos uploaded by users about the controversial issue.

The system will display information from Wikipedia or Britannica Encyclopedia to show factual information in small fragments below videos on climate change.

YouTube has already implemented the video feature on a host of other controversial topics, including the MMR vaccine, the moon landing and UFOs.

However, this is the first time that the platform focuses on the climate change deniers.

The feature is the last step of the video platform owned by Google in its battle to reduce the spread of misinformation and conspiracy theories in the service.

Users who upload their content to YouTube can not stop the service that displays faint images of factual information below its content.

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YouTube is subtly taking on climate change deniers by providing a fact check box below some videos that reject climate change. This is the next step of the video platform owned by Google in its war against misinformation and conspiracy theories (pictured)

YouTube is subtly taking on climate change deniers by providing a fact check box below some videos that reject climate change. This is the next step of the video platform owned by Google in its war against misinformation and conspiracy theories (pictured)

YouTube is subtly taking on climate change deniers by providing a fact check box below some videos that reject climate change. This is the next step of the video platform owned by Google in its war against misinformation and conspiracy theories (pictured)

The feature, which was first announced in March, was initially intended to be used for conspiracy theory videos on topics such as the Oklahoma bombing and the moon landing.

This month, YouTube has expanded the fact-checking function to include more controversial topics, such as the MMR vaccine and the perceived link to autism.

The introduction of information on climate change marks the first time that YouTube has gone astray in the scientific field.

At the moment, the scientific data verification blots are only visible to US users. However, YouTube is slowly launching the show to viewers around the world.

In an example of the updated feature, A fragment of Wikipedia said: "multiple lines of scientific evidence show that the climate system is heating up."

A The YouTube spokesperson previously confirmed that there will be a delay from the time a Wikipedia page is edited until it appears in the preview below a video.

This is designed so that Wikipedia editors have time to detect any discrepancy that seeps under the radar.

"I guess it will have some influence, at least for people who do not know much about the subject," Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication, told BuzzFeed News.

It can be confusing for some people, but that's probably better than just accepting denier video at face value.

Initially, YouTube failed to tell Wikipedia that it would use its content for this purpose, but since then the contact between the two firms has taken place with the site working together to combat the spread of inaccurate information.

A Wikipedia publication for its users and administrators revealed a list of seven topics on which YouTube would be using Wikipedia information on its site, including the MMR vaccine and global warming.

When Wikipedia's new advertising policy came into force in July, YouTube did not publicly confirm that climate change was an affected issue.

The users were not notified of the change, with the change only noticed once the erasures began to appear sporadically in certain videos.

A Wikipedia publication for its users and administrators revealed a list of seven topics on which YouTube would use Wikipedia information on its site, including the MMR vaccine and global warming.

A Wikipedia publication for its users and administrators revealed a list of seven topics on which YouTube would use Wikipedia information on its site, including the MMR vaccine and global warming.

When Wikipedia's new advertising policy came into force in July, YouTube did not say publicly that climate change was an impacted issue.

When Wikipedia's new advertising policy came into force in July, YouTube did not say publicly that climate change was an impacted issue.

Initially, YouTube failed to tell Wikipedia that it would use its content for this purpose, but contact between the two companies has since occurred with the site working together to combat the spread of inaccurate information.

The Heartland Institute, a group of experts that publishes videos that question climate change, confirmed that YouTube did not inform them about the change.

Meanwhile, PragerU, a non-profit online institution that has also been affected by the recent addition of climate change to the show, says the latest update is a YouTube example that shows political bias.

"Despite claiming that it is a public forum and an open platform for all, YouTube is clearly a leftist organization," said Craig Strazzeri, marketing director of PragerU.

"This is just another error in a long list of missteps that erodes America's confidence in Big Tech, very similar to what has happened with the traditional news media."

WHAT YOUTUBE VIDEOS WILL PRESENT THE WIKIPEDIA FACTUAL VERIFICATION FORECASTS?

Wikipedia received a list of topics whose content would appear below videos of certain topics.

Those items are –

  • Global warming
  • Sweet Base
  • Lilla Saltsjöbadsavtalet
  • Air fall of Camarate 1980
  • Federal Emergency Management Agency
  • Kecksburg UFO Incident
  • MMR vaccine

YouTube says the policy is designed to provide users with easy access to external information to provide context and information on topics prone to misinformation.

He also revealed that more labels will appear in the videos in the coming months.

"I welcome this change," Katharine Hayhoe, climate scientist at the Texas Tech University, told BuzzFeed News.

"I appreciate YouTube taking its responsibility seriously to help people understand the difference."

Jason Reifler, a professor of political science at the University of Exeter, also lavished praise on YouTube for making the change.

"They could have chosen a stronger wording and better understood the real terms of the debate between the extremely well-supported consensus scientific video and the much smaller proportion of skeptics," Dr. Reifler told BuzzFeed News.

"I doubt that this first step will do much, but I hope so!

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