YouTube employees turn off bosses for not knocking out rapper YG’s ‘anti-Asian’ Meet the Flockers video

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YouTube employees have condemned the company for refusing to remove rapper YG’s Meet the Flockers video that they say is “ anti-Asian, ” as an employee used the 1965 Bloody Sunday march to illustrate how the decision is on the wrong side of justice.

According to Bloomberg, several YouTube employees criticized their bosses, who ultimately decided not to delete the 2014 song.

Workers say the song encourages attacks on predominantly Chinese neighborhoods

The song begins with the following verse: ‘First find a house and look forward to it. Find a Chinese neighborhood as they don’t believe in bank accounts. Second, you will find a crew and a driver, someone rings the bell.

And someone who is not afraid to do what he does. Third, you stop on the spot. Park, look, ring the bell and knock. Four, make sure no one is home. They’re gone, okay, it’s on. ‘

YouTube employees have condemned the company for refusing to remove rapper YG's Meet the Flockers video (pictured on YouTube) that they believe is `` anti-Asian '' and encourages targeting primarily Chinese neighborhoods.

YouTube employees have condemned the company for refusing to remove rapper YG’s Meet the Flockers video (pictured on YouTube) that they believe is “ anti-Asian ” and encourages targeting primarily Chinese neighborhoods.

Employees had asked YouTube's Trust & Safety team to remove the (photo) video from YG.  However, their request was denied on March 22, even after executives said they also find this video very offensive and understand that it is painful for many to watch.

Employees had asked YouTube's Trust & Safety team to remove the (photo) video from YG.  However, their request was denied on March 22, even after executives said they also find this video very offensive and understand that it is painful for many to watch.

Employees had asked YouTube’s Trust & Safety team to remove the (photo) video from YG. However, their request was denied on March 22, even after executives said they also find this video very offensive and understand that it is painful for many to watch.

According to Bloomberg, the employees had asked YouTube’s Trust & Safety team to remove the video. However, their request was denied on March 22.

Executives declined the request, even after saying they also find this video “very offensive and understand that it is painful for many to watch, including many in Trust & Safety.”

In an email to employees obtained by Bloomberg, YouTube executives wrote: “ While we discussed this decision at length among our policy experts, we made the difficult decision to leave the video on in order to consistently enforce our policies. and avoid setting any potential precedent. which forced us to delete a lot of other music on YouTube. ‘

They said that while they disagree with the lyrics, YouTube makes exceptions for content that is educational, documentary, scientific, or artistic (EDSA).

In this case, this video gets an EDSA exception as a musical performance. While EDSA is not a free pass to any content, there are likely thousands of music videos that would otherwise violate policies, including sex and nudity, violent or graphic content, and hate speech, were it not for these types of EDSA exceptions, ” said the executives.

As a result, removing this video would have far-reaching consequences for other musical content with similarly violent or offensive lyrics, in genres ranging from rap to rock.

Upon receipt of the decision, employees commented on an internal bulletin board. One person wrote, “Which side of Edmund Pettus Bridge do you want to be?” The employee was referring to the 1965 Bloody Sunday (pictured) when black civil rights activists were attacked by police as they marched from Selma, Alabama, to Montgomery.

Upon receipt of the decision, employees commented on an internal bulletin board expressing their concerns.

One person wrote, “This is your perfect opportunity to demonstrate your leadership as the lead actor for” Racial Justice Initiative. ” Which side of the Edmund Pettus bridge do you want to be on? ‘

The employee was referring to the Bloody Sunday in 1965 when black civil rights activists, including the late John Lewis, were attacked by police as they marched from Selma, Alabama, to Montgomery.

YouTube executives also held a special town hall on Thursday to discuss the matter.

But many left town hall unhappy with what they heard, one criticizing a director for saying his wife is Asian-American.

“Asian women are not a reference,” the employee wrote.

“Someone I know is Asian,” shared another. “Is this a valid excuse for allowing the video to stay on YouTube?”

Anti-Asian hate incidents have increased during the pandemic. Between March 2020 and February 2021, nearly 3,800 anti-Asian racist incidents had been reported to stop AAPI Hate.

The incident comes just two weeks after eight people were fatally shot in attacks on massage companies in Atlanta and nearby Cherokee County on March 16. Six of those victims were Asian Americans.