Researchers at the University of Nottingham Trent analyzed the first extensive recordings of the dorsal-ventral abdominal vibration signal (DVAV) of bees.

The recordings have revealed that young bees that loosen loose on arriving at work with a drumming sound made by their older relatives.

  • The dorsal-ventral abdominal vibration signal (DVAV) was recorded in three hives
  • Researchers at the University of Nottingham Trent analyzed data collected during a year
  • He showed that more experienced bees transfer noisy messages through vibration.
  • The effect on individual bees is difficult to establish but activates the colony as a whole.

Phoebe Southworth For Mailonline

Scientists have revealed that impatient bees make a drumming noise to make the younger members of the hive work harder.

Researchers at the University of Nottingham Trent analyzed the first extensive recordings of the dorsal-ventral abdominal vibration signal (DVAV) of insects.

They reveal that the most experienced bees in the foraging search transfer the noisy message by vibrating their abdomen while they grab another bee with their legs.

Researchers at the University of Nottingham Trent analyzed the first extensive recordings of the dorsal-ventral abdominal vibration signal (DVAV) of bees.

Researchers at the University of Nottingham Trent analyzed the first extensive recordings of the dorsal-ventral abdominal vibration signal (DVAV) of bees.

It can also be transmitted through vibration directly into the honeycomb or through the transmitting bee that flies around the hive by repeatedly displaying the sound.

Although it is difficult to determine the effect on individual bees, it has been shown that the strategy activates the colony as a whole.

The DVAV signal has been known to biologists for approximately 90 years and some have captured a video of their production.

But previous studies have only monitored bees for short periods during the day.

Now, Martin Bencsik and his colleagues have analyzed the year-long data from the recording devices placed inside the honeycomb in three hives.

& # 39; The receiving bee seems to be energized. Continue your work with more energy, as if you had a coffee or something like that, "Bencsik said.

He added: "I am convinced that the daily statistics of this rich repertoire of vibratory signals will give us a very specific picture of the state of the colony."

The DVAV signal can be transmitted from one bee to another, through vibration directly in the beehive or by the transmitting bee that flies around the hive and deploys it repeatedly.

The DVAV signal can be transmitted from one bee to another, through vibration directly in the beehive or by the transmitting bee that flies around the hive and deploys it repeatedly.

The DVAV signal can be transmitted from one bee to another, through vibration directly in the beehive or by the transmitting bee that flies around the hive and deploys it repeatedly.

The recordings reveal that the signal occurs more frequently at night.

Although there is no foraging at this time, the processing of food or the care of the young, which takes place throughout the day, could explain this.

The DVAV signal is one of the many vibratory signals that bees are known to make.

Others include the sounds of & # 39; tooting and quacking & # 39; Made by virgin queens and a sound of & # 39; whooping & # 39; That seems to express surprise.

Several dances are also used as a communication device within the colonies.

They can indicate where other bees should feed and if a bee wants its wings to be prepared.

The dorsal-ventral abdominal vibration signal (DVAV): wiser bees that tell young people to go to work

The first extensive recordings of the DVAV signal have been analyzed by researchers at the University of Nottingham Trent.

They reveal that the most experienced bees in the foraging search transfer the noisy message by vibrating their abdomen while they grab another bee with their legs.

It can also be transmitted through vibration directly into the honeycomb or through the transmitting bee that flies around the hive by repeatedly displaying the sound.

Although it is difficult to determine the effect on individual bees, it has been shown that the strategy activates the colony as a whole.

The DVAV signal has been known to biologists for approximately 90 years.

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