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You should BOOK an A&E appointment this winter: NHS told plans for patients to ‘call first’

Patients will be asked to make an A&E appointment by calling 111 this winter, NHS bosses have been told.

The plans, unveiled yesterday at a board meeting for NHS England and NHS Improvement, will be implemented before December.

However, hospitals will not reject patients who show up without calling ahead, it was claimed.

Pilot studies of the ring-ahead scheme in the emergency departments in Portsmouth and London reportedly produced good results.

Patients will be asked to make an A&E appointment by calling 111 this winter, NHS bosses have been told. Pictured: St Thomas Hospital, Westminster

Patients will be asked to make an A&E appointment by calling 111 this winter, NHS bosses have been told. Pictured: St Thomas Hospital, Westminster

Plans to “transform” the emergency room will go towards cutting the four-hour waiting period, it was also revealed.

Hospitals will be asked to adapt quickly to the measures and to make improvements along the way, administrative documents from The times.

NHS trusts across England are currently working on a four-hour wait to serve emergency departments.

The norm is that 95 percent of patients visiting an emergency room must be admitted, transferred or discharged within four hours.

However, the NHS has failed to meet its four-hour benchmark for nearly five years in a row.

WHAT IS THE FOUR HOUR WITHDRAWAL PERIOD AND HOW DOES THE BELL-FIRST MODEL WORK?

The NHS’s four-hour A&E goal is one set out in the NHS Constitution, which states that 95 percent of all emergency patients in England must be hospitalized or discharged within four hours of arrival.

Hospitals’ performance against this measure has been tracked for more than a decade.

Nationally, the NHS has not achieved its 95 percent target since July 2015, when it was 95.2 percent.

Since then, there has been a steady decline to the record low of October 2019 of 83.6 percent.

That low meant that one in six people who went to A&E in that month waited there for more than four hours – more than 320,000.

Unable to reach the ambitious 95 percent, the health service wanted to switch to a system that does not measure waiting times based on a fixed benchmark, but simply tries to treat the more urgent cases faster and lower the limit for less severe patients.

And during the Covid-19 pandemic, NHS chiefs revealed they are trying out a phone-first model.

Patients should call a number – such as the NHS 111 line, that patients should call if they need help, but it is not an emergency – as the first point of contact.

Patients who are considered urgent and at risk of death are still told to go straight to the emergency room. But people with a broken limb, for example, can be told to wait.

However, people who don’t have an appointment are not turned down.

Stephen Powis, NHS England’s national medical director, told the Commons Health and Social Care committee that the NHS wanted to move to a telephone arrangement.

He revealed in June that two emergency departments in Portsmouth and London would be involved in a pilot project.

The target replacement has been on the map since Theresa May was Prime Minister when she and the NHS bosses said it was time to rethink how the NHS was rated.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock has previously suggested deleting the target to reduce demand for services.

Emergency visits have declined dramatically during the coronavirus pandemic as people fled hospitals during closure.

But as the threat of a possible second wave of the coronavirus pandemic looms, MPs have been told that an emergency first-aid system can help prevent overcrowding.

Patients should call a number – such as the NHS 111 line, that patients should call if they need help, but it is not an emergency – as the first point of contact.

Patients who are considered urgent and at risk of death are still told to go straight to the emergency room. But people with a broken limb, for example, can be told to wait.

People who do not have an appointment will not be sent away Pulse magazine reported.

Pilot studies of a new, call first model have since started – three years after NHS England and the government started talking about such pilots.

Stephen Powis, NHS England’s national medical director, told the Commons Health and Social Care committee that the NHS wanted to move to a telephone arrangement.

He revealed at the end of June: ‘We are testing different forms of that’ call first ‘ [model] in London, in Portsmouth, in other areas too, because we want to make sure we get the right model.

“We want – as we did at Covid – to increasingly move to a 111-first model, which ensures that we do everything we can to give people the right signposts to the most suitable place for treatment.”

At a joint board meeting between NHS England and NHS Improvement yesterday, Pauline Philip, national director of emergency and emergency care, said the pilot projects were going well.

She said, “What we’re really doing is introducing something like another” social norm. ”

“People have traditionally had access to emergency care by coming to an emergency room, and now we say there are better ways to do it.”

Papers revealed that hospitals will be asked to adapt ‘quickly’ to the measures that have yet to be completed.

Pulse reported that the papers said, “Early mover systems – one in each region – will be the first to test some of these innovations. An early, formal evaluation of the impact on services within the regions of the early mover was commissioned in September.

“The ambition [is] then all systems will have implemented a minimum specification of the model by December 1, 2020. ‘

The plans were described by Lord Prior of Brampton, chairman of NHS England, as “a major change.”

The King’s Fund health think tank analyst, Siva Anandaciva, told the Health Service Journal that “rapidly changing the way A&E performance is measured in the fall will not be an easy task.”

He added that it will be particularly difficult as the NHS prepares for a possible second wave of coronavirus.

The joint council of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine and other royal colleges said, “The rollout of new standards would be part of the wider transformation of the emergency services.”

Ministers warn this winter about a possible second wave of the pandemic, but now fear that it could come sooner. Boris Johnson fears a second wave of coronavirus could start in two weeks, it was revealed.

A high government source told the Mail that the Prime Minister was “extremely concerned” about outbreaks that broke out “both at home and abroad.

Although the number of cases in the UK is relatively low, increases were recorded every day for the first time since the peak in April last week.

The seven-day average is nearly 700-28 percent more than three weeks ago.

The NHS has not reached its four-hour benchmark waiting time for nearly five years in a row. December 2019 data revealed for the past nine years, the number of people waiting more than four hours in emergency has risen from a low of 66,661 in 2011 to a record high of 396,762 in 2019

The NHS has not reached its four-hour benchmark waiting time for nearly five years in a row. December 2019 data revealed for the past nine years, the number of people waiting more than four hours in emergency has risen from a low of 66,661 in 2011 to a record high of 396,762 in 2019

The NHS has not reached its four-hour benchmark waiting time for nearly five years in a row. December 2019 data revealed for the past nine years, the number of people waiting more than four hours in emergency has risen from a low of 66,661 in 2011 to a record high of 396,762 in 2019

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