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You feel lonely? It could be that you are only cold according to a new study

Do you feel you want company? According to a new study, you may only be cold, which links the desire for company with low air temperatures

  • A new experiment reveals that cold people are more willing to communicate with friends
  • On the contrary, being warmer tends to make people feel less inclined to connect.
  • Based on interviews with 78 people at temperatures ranging between 46 ° F and 82 ° F

The results of a new experiment suggest that people are more likely to seek the company of old friends and loved ones when they are in colder environments.

The research comes from a joint research project by Adam Fay of the State University of New York and Jon Maner of the State University of Florida.

The experiment was conducted around an in-person interview during which subjects were asked what possibilities they would have of communicating with an old friend or loved one in the next week.

A new joint research article supports the long-standing theory that people with physical cold are more likely to seek company or social connection.

A new joint research article supports the long-standing theory that people with physical cold are more likely to seek company or social connection.

The turn came in the form of temperatures to which they were exposed, a variable that seemed to influence how they answered the questions, supporting a long-standing theory that people feel more content being alone in warmer temperatures and more socially necessary in the colder

For the experiment, the researchers selected 78 people for interviews, according to a report in the research summary of the British Psychological Society.

The researchers explained that the purpose of the interview was to examine attitudes about a heated wrapping device, which subjects should use during the interview.

After some questions about how the wrap felt, the researchers asked a series of questions about social activities during the next week, including the likelihood of the subject communicating with an old friend or a loved one.

During this part of the interrogation, some subjects had their posterior wrap adjusted to produce mild heat, while others had their back wrap disconnected.

Based on interviews with 78 people, the researchers found that the warmer the room temperature was, the less inclined people were to say they would approach an old friend or loved one next week.

Based on interviews with 78 people, the researchers found that the warmer the room temperature was, the less inclined people were to say they would approach an old friend or loved one next week.

Based on interviews with 78 people, the researchers found that the warmer the room temperature was, the less inclined people were to say they would approach an old friend or loved one next week.

People who responded with the wrap adjusted to moderate heat were consistently less likely than those who did not receive any heat to say they would consider communicating with a friend or loved one.

The same general effect was observed on days with warmer temperatures, with an ambient temperature range between 46 ° F and 82 ° F during interrogation.

According to Manyer and Fay, these results “suggest that seemingly subtle changes in temperature may have important implications for the psychology of social affiliation, and such findings apply in real-world contexts outside the laboratory.”

ARE YOU ALONE? MORE THAN A THIRD OF BRITISH MEN FEEL THE SAME

Millions of men across the UK are hiding feelings of loneliness, an investigation revealed in May.

Up to 35 percent of men in Britain feel alone at least once a week, while 11 percent admit to suffering with emotion every day, according to a study by the Royal Voluntary Service Commission.

Getting away from family and friends is the main driver of loneliness, causing 18 percent of cases, the investigation adds.

According to the study, going through a break, being unemployed and the death of a family member are the causes in 17 percent of patients.

More than 25 percent of men aged 65 to 69 blame retirement for their loneliness, the research adds.

David McCullough, executive director of the Royal Voluntary Service charity of the elderly, said: “These are clear findings, but given the stigma associated with loneliness, there are likely to be many more men who still do not express their feelings.”

“Whether learning a new skill, practicing an old one or just keeping fit and talking, there are activities and groups across the country for all tastes and that offer an excellent way for older men to develop their social networks.”

‘Unfortunately, for some, the possibility of joining a new group can be daunting and we encourage those with older male friends and family to help them overcome these fears, perhaps offering to take them or even join them the first few times.’

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