Xiaomi security cams are avoided by Google after an error streams the video feed from strangers to the wrong person

Xiaomi security cameras are locked out by Google after discovering an error that streams the video feed from strangers to the wrong person

  • One user could stream video feeds from strangers’ cameras
  • Xiaomi cannot currently be integrated with the Google Home app or assistant
  • Currents included the houses of people and in one case a baby in a cradle
  • Google said it has contacted Xiaomi to resolve the issue

Security cameras from the Chinese technology company Xiaomi are excluded by Google after evidence of a serious security error.

According to Android police, Google has withdrawn the ability of Xiaomi to integrate with the Home app or Google Assistant after some devices mysteriously started streaming video feed from stranger’s cameras.

The decision comes only a day after a Reddit user has demonstrated the relevant error in a video.

Photos posted by a Reddit user show how the cameras of other users mysteriously appeared in a feed that is streamed to a smart view of Google Hub. The photo above shows a small child resting in a cradle

Photos posted by a Reddit user show how the cameras of other users mysteriously appeared in a feed that is streamed to a smart view of Google Hub. The photo above shows a small child resting in a cradle

The video feeds varied from random interiors of houses and possibly companies. It is unclear how or where the feeds come from

The video feeds varied from random interiors of houses and possibly companies. It is unclear how or where the feeds come from

The video feeds varied from random interiors of houses and possibly companies. It is unclear how or where the feeds come from

The user, named Dio-V, discovered that when the device attempts to view a security camera on a Nest Hub – Google’s Smart home brand line – the device instead retrieves images from different security cameras that do not belong to the poster.

Some images show in-home videos of empty rooms, or in one case a video of a sleeping baby.

The owner of the camera used a Xiaomi Mijia camera with firmware version 3.5.1_00.66.

It is unclear what exactly caused the problem, but according to 9to5Mac, Google contacted Xiaomi in an attempt to solve the problem.

Although it is a problem, it does not seem to have been replicated by anyone else so far, which means that it may only affect a limited number of devices.

The news of a potential vulnerability comes with poor timing for companies selling internet cameras, as a series of hack reports raise doubts about the safety of popular internet cameras created by Ring and the Google-owned Nest.

Device security questions recently resulted in a class-action lawsuit filed against Ring’s home security system and parent company, Amazon, which accuses the e-commerce giant of not protecting its customers against hackers.

The error was documented by a Xiaomi Mijia camera owner with firmware version 3.5.1_00.66 (pictured above)

The error was documented by a Xiaomi Mijia camera owner with firmware version 3.5.1_00.66 (pictured above)

The error was documented by a Xiaomi Mijia camera owner with firmware version 3.5.1_00.66 (pictured above)

The complaint, filed with the US Central District Court in California, claims that Amazon from Ring and Jeff Bezos, who bought the company last year, was negligent in not taking “robust” security measures.

A series of hacks on Ring and Nest security cameras last month also attracted media attention and was directed back to a podcast that broadcasts the intrusions for laughter.

According to a report from Motherboard, a podcast named NulledCast has been involved in a number of hacks on Amazon security cameras in which hackers control the device’s microphone to harass victims on the other side.

A Mississippi mother has released a video from the team behind NulledCast talking to her eight-year-old daughter through a ring camera in her bedroom.

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