Wren retains the title of the most common bird in Britain, as a streak of mild winters sends rising numbers

Wren retains the title of the most common bird in Britain, as a series of mild winters sends the number of couples to 11 million

  • Thousands of volunteers helped the British Trust for Ornithology examine birds
  • The wren is more numerous than the blackbird, the robin and the sparrow.
  • Figures of pigeons and wading birds such as lapwing and oystercatcher are falling
  • The results will help inform conservation policy and site management decisions.

The wren has retained the title of the most common bird in Britain, as a streak of mild winters has sent the number of pairs of the small bird to around 11 million.

This figure means that the wren is more numerous than the blackbird, the robin and the sparrow, according to a report by the British Trust for Ornithology.

His latest survey, which was conducted in 2013, also had Wren at the top of the list, but with a population of just over 8.5 million pairs.

It is known that Wren numbers fluctuate with environmental conditions, and it is possible that climate change has benefited one of our smallest birds.

Scroll down to watch the video

The wren, in the photo, has retained the title of the most common bird in Britain, since a streak of mild winters has sent the number of couples of the small bird to around 11 million

The wren, in the photo, has retained the title of the most common bird in Britain, since a streak of mild winters has sent the number of couples of the small bird to around 11 million

TOP SIX BRITISH BIRDS PER NUMBER

1. Wren (11 million pairs)

2. Robin (7.35 million pairs)

3. Sparrow (5.3 million pairs)

4. wood pigeon (5.15 million pairs)

5. Finch (5.05 million territories)

5. Blackbird (5.05 million territories)

Although the number of chocones has continued to increase, not all bird species in the United Kingdom have been so lucky.

The turtledove, of which there were about 75,000 couples in 1997, was reduced to just 3,600 in the last report.

In addition, there are no longer breeding waders in the United Kingdom with a breeding population greater than 100,000 pairs.

Both the lapwing and the oystercatcher have now fallen below this threshold for the first time.

The researchers were also surprised by the drop in numbers of the vulgar finch, one of Britain's most familiar birds.

In the last seven years, its breeding population has been reduced by 1.15 million couples, and the cause of this decline remains unclear.

It is estimated that, in total, there are about 85 million breeding pairs of birds in the United Kingdom, the equivalent of about more than a quarter and a quarter for each of us.

This figure is similar to its latest estimate made in 2013. There are also 20 species whose populations total more than one million pairs.

Although the number of chocones has continued to increase, not all bird species in the United Kingdom have been so lucky. The turtle pigeon, in the photo, of which there were about 75,000 couples in 1997, was reduced to just 3,600 in the latest British Trust for Ornithology report

Although the number of chocones has continued to increase, not all bird species in the United Kingdom have been so lucky. The turtle pigeon, in the photo, of which there were about 75,000 couples in 1997, was reduced to just 3,600 in the latest British Trust for Ornithology report

Although the number of chocones has continued to increase, not all bird species in the United Kingdom have been so lucky. The turtle pigeon, in the photo, of which there were about 75,000 couples in 1997, was reduced to just 3,600 in the latest British Trust for Ornithology

"It's great to have these latest estimates of the numbers of our birds," said article author Ian Woodward of the British Trust for Ornithology.

"Knowing how many of the species we have is important for many reasons, including the ability to make better informed decisions when it comes to conservation and site management policies."

"It is thanks to the thousands of volunteers who participate in a variety of bird surveys that we have the data and are able to produce these figures."

The British Trust for Ornithology has conducted four bird population surveys to date, the first in 1997, followed by others in 2006, 2013 and 2020.

The full results of the survey were published in the magazine. British birds, while a summary of the key findings of the report can be read in the British Trust for Ornithology website.

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) sciencetech (t) Climate change and global warming