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Sarah Wolff runs the rocket up and down in a banana to demonstrate the sound wave therapy that she and her husband claim to treat erectile dysfunction at home
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Sarah Wolff accompanies a rocket – an eponym-shaped white plastic device – up and down the outside of a banana while producing a crackling sound, unlike that of a geiger counter.

According to Sarah, a DO in Los Angeles, and her co-inventor husband, Dustin, that cracking is the sound of an erectile dysfunction (ED) treatment without pills or even the need to leave the house.

Sarah and Dustin run a clinic where she practices general medicine as an osteophatic doctor, but spends much of her days with a kind of mild shock treatment on men's penises, with the seemingly paradoxical goal of making them work better.

She's not the only one using this new electronic alternative to Viagra, but she and Dustin acknowledged that while theirs is less invasive and involves fewer risks than other ED treatments, there are two barriers for many men are for treatment.

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The first is costs. Most men under six treatments range between $ 3,000 and $ 10,000.

The second problem is Sarah.

& # 39; Boys are scared, they are afraid to ask about ED and are ashamed, and of course I am a woman & # 39 ;, Sarah told DailyMail.com.

Even asking her for ED pills can be a challenge for Sarah's male patients. Dropping their pants and having her perform the soundwave treatment that so many come to Sarah & # 39; s clinic can be completely deadly to some, she says.

So together with an engineer, Sarah and Dustin came up with the Rocket, a home version of sonic penis treatments.

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The patent has been applied for, pre-orders are coming in and the couple say they have taken all kinds of precautions to make sure it is safe – but only the time and sex life of customers will tell how the Rocket really performs.

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Sarah Wolff runs the rocket up and down in a banana to demonstrate the sound wave therapy that she and her husband claim to treat erectile dysfunction at home

Sarah Wolff runs the rocket up and down in a banana to demonstrate the sound wave therapy that she and her husband claim to treat erectile dysfunction at home

Urologists estimate that about 10 percent of men per decade struggle with mild to moderate erectile dysfunction.

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In other words, about 30 percent of men in their thirties sometimes struggle to get or keep an erection, 40 percent of men in their forties, 50 percent of men in their fifties, and so on.

ED is just as complicated as usual.

It is psychological, arises or worsens in times of stress, depression or anxiety.

It is influenced by lifestyle, with drinking, smoking, drug use and fatigue all contributing to ED.

Disruptions in just about any physiological system can also affect or cause ED: from diabetes to neurological problems, heart disease to obesity, thyroid or hormonal problems to something as simple as the curvature of a penis (or Peyronie's disease).

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The Urology Department of the University of Washington state & # 39; poor communication with partner & # 39; at the top of the list of psychological causes.

In the most biological sense, an erection occurs when blood flows into the penis where it is caught, creating pressure that expands the penis.

If that blood flow does not happen, there is also no erection.

Sarah (left), a doctor for osteopathy, says she wanted a way to help men with ED more discreetly, permanently and with no side effects. When her husband, Dustin (right), heard about sound wave therapy on a podcast, Sarah started using it in her own practice

Sarah (left), a doctor for osteopathy, says she wanted a way to help men with ED more discreetly, permanently and with no side effects. When her husband, Dustin (right), heard about sound wave therapy on a podcast, Sarah started using it in her own practice

Sarah (left), a doctor for osteopathy, says she wanted a way to help men with ED more discreetly, permanently and with no side effects. When her husband, Dustin (right), heard about sound wave therapy on a podcast, Sarah started using it in her own practice

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One thing that prevents blood from flowing through blood vessels is plaque, a waxy gum of fat, cholesterol, and calcium that can accumulate and harden in the arteries, limiting blood flow.

This sequence is common and affects about half of us at the age of 40, and it is more common and intense among men.

Low wave shock therapy such as the medical device that Sarah uses in her clinic can help treat ED, but it's not the way she was taught to treat ED.

During much of her 15 years of practice, I would see these men coming in or a physical one, and they would not bring it up until they walked out the door, and they would say: & # 39; by the way, can I get a script for some kind of ED medication? & # 39;

And even if she gave them the prescription, the same men would have to keep coming back and ask sheepishly for more medication.

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She mentioned this pattern to one of her superiors in her previous office.

& # 39; She said, "Look, we're not fixing people, if we fix them, they'll never come back," Sarah recalls.

Plaque builds up in blood vessels, blocks blood flow to the penis and disrupts erections, but scientists think low-intensity shock waves break plaque

Plaque builds up in blood vessels, blocks blood flow to the penis and disrupts erections, but scientists think low-intensity shock waves break plaque

Studies also suggest that these electrical pulses stimulate the growth of new blood vessels

Studies also suggest that these electrical pulses stimulate the growth of new blood vessels

Plaque builds up in blood vessels, blocking blood flow to the penis and disrupting erections, but scientists think low-intensity shock waves break plaque (left). Studies also suggest that these electrical pulses stimulate the growth of new blood vessels (right)

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& # 39; That's why I didn't end up in healthcare. & # 39;

So she went her own way, started her own clinic, more focused on osteopathy, holistic and Eastern medicine.

But in fact it was her husband, Dustin – who has 15 years of marketing under his belt, but no special medical experience – who introduced the idea of ​​soundwave therapy for ED to Sarah.

& # 39; I strongly support manifestation & # 39 ;, says Dustin.

& # 39; And I was on the 405 (highway) listening to a podcast ad that this guest speaker was talking about this incredible fool he had done in Florida with this European sound wave machine. & # 39;

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It is called technically low intensive physical shock wave therapy (LI-EWST) and it is thought that these energy waves break plaque and stimulate the growth of new blood vessels through microscopic damage to the tissue.

That damage effectively tells the body to heal a wound – a painless penis, according to Dustin, who has undergone treatment numerous times – and that includes launching new blood vessels.

Like its predecessor of medical quality, the low intensity of shock waves make a clear sound and can be felt & # 39; pulsing through the tissue & # 39 ;, Dustin says. Sarah demonstrates on her arm

Like its predecessor of medical quality, the low intensity of shock waves make a clear sound and can be felt & # 39; pulsing through the tissue & # 39 ;, Dustin says. Sarah demonstrates on her arm

Like its predecessor of medical quality, the low intensity of shock waves make a clear sound and can be felt & # 39; pulsing through the tissue & # 39 ;, Dustin says. Sarah demonstrates on her arm

Sarah and her colleagues also use the machine to encourage healing in other parts of the body, but ED is by far the condition they use most often to treat.

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& # 39; You can feel it pulsing through the tissue, & # 39; Dustin says.

Sarah adds: & # 39; it has a sound – it is definitely not silent. & # 39;

Some men don't need any anesthetic cream, others do.

But immediately afterwards there are no pains or side effects, Dustin and Sarah claim.

Some men have even told Sarah that they go home immediately and immediately benefit from the effects of treatment with their wives or partners.

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However, that does not take away the embarrassing factor.

It is not approved by the FDA, but that is the problem that the Wolffs hope to solve with the Rocket.

It delivers shocks of the same intensity to a man's penis at home as the medical device in the office, but does so with a mechanical rather than a pump-based architecture, which costs $ 749.

They also have a stop mechanism built in that prevents men from using it for too long or even too often during the month.

The Rocket is still in the design phase, but Sarah says she has small & # 39; clinical studies & # 39; in her office. performed in an anecdotal sense.

And Dustin has made himself a more than willing guinea pig: I have used and will not market anything that I have not used, he promises.

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